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DISK DRIVES 

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We have the lowest possible 
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Prices subject to change without notice. 
Not responsible for typographical errors. 
TRS-80 is a registered trademark of Tandy Corp. 



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617-466-3193 "•• catalog 



Under the Rainbow 



74 



84 




170 









Cover acrylic and centerfold 
watercolor illustrations by Fred 
Crawford. Separations by Kelly 
Color Corp. 



Feature Articles 



Creating Your Own Ad venture /Geoff Wells 18 

Here is the second step in making your own Adventure 

program. 
Having An Adventure With Ad venture I Jim Reed 20 

Our Managing Editor turns into a vampire but manages to 

get all the judges' comments condensed into this report on 

our Adventure contest. 
Sir Randolf of the Moors/ Gregory Clark 26 

The winner of our contest's non-graphic division. See the 

centerfold depicting some of his Adventures. 
Dungeon Ad venture / Gregory Ricketts 50 

The winner of our contest's graphic division. 
Invitations Made Easy/ Bob Dooman 74 

Let CoCo send out invites for the big occasion! 
Is This A Serial? / Sue Searby 76 

The author explains the difference between serial and 

parallel printer signals. 
A Super Duper For Hams/ Burton Witham Jr 80 

Duplicate contacts can be CoCoized — and are. 
MATHPAL Will Teach Youngsters /Daw? Hooper Ill 

Colors, sounds and mathematics combine to in this program 

for children in grades one through five. 
Get Into The Hobbit Of Playing/Davzd Sweat 122 

Are there Ores in Middle Earth? Are they after you? Let's do 

something about it all with this game. 
An Index To the Rainbow?/ M. P. Wilson 126 

The first nine issues are indexed with this program. 
Who Goes On RANDOM WALKS?/ R. T. Delburgo 130 

Spent too much time Waltzing Matilda} Now, what's the 

way home? 
Illustrating Lectures With Graphics/ Dr. Lane P. Lester 136 

These chemistry graphics show how the teacher might 

combine CoCo and class. 
Make A Hex Pad Loader/ Ted Hasenstaub 143 

This hardware project will make a nice evening's work. 
Establishing A CoCo Educational Network I Dr. Paul Kimmelman & David 
Macali 154 

Educators can establish networks which will help one 

another work better with CoCo. 
Now Lookit That!/£ d Pollard 164 

These random graphics patterns are a little bit different and 

quite enjoyable. 
Use Basic "Up Top"/ Jorge Mir 166 

Now you can load your Basic programs at the very top of 

RAM and use all the bottom 32K for variables and arrays. 
Big-Time Graphics/£d Krikorian 170 

Now you can produce in-depth graphics just like you see on 

the "big" computers. 
A Real TRIGSHO W/C. A. Rumbant 175 

This program will not only teach some basic elements of trig, 

but it will do it graphically. 
Sign Up For This One/ David Steyer 190 

Make long banners or smaller signs with these two programs 

created especially for non-graphic printers. But, they'll work 

on others, too. 



Departments 

Letters To Rainbow/ Our Readers 6 

PRINT #-2,/ Lawrence C. Folk 8 

Editor's Notes 
Taking Basic Training/ Joseph Kolar 10 

More on organizing to make your programming easier. 
Bits And Bytes Of Basic /Dick White 12 

Our new series for beginners. 
The Dragon's Byte/5/7/ Nolan 15 

Preparing to store and update character information for 

your FRP "people." 
Turn Of The Screw/ Tony DiStefano 78 

Our new Hardware Column explores the inside of the 

POKE speedup. 
Education Notes/Steve Blyn 92 

User friendly programs are good f oreducational purposes — 

if you don't go overboard with this feature. 
Assembly Corner / Dennis Lewandowski 95 

Our columnist contributes a program that makes it easy for 

you to type in Basic programs — without typing mistakes. 

The Pipeline/ S/a/f 104 

Using Graphics/ Don Inman 106 

Making things move, with a parachute and a plane as 

examples. 
Charlie's Ma chine /Charles Roslund 118 

A way to merge your machine language routines into your 

Basic programs. 

Back Issue Information 121 

Corrections 188 

The GameM aster's Apprentice by Bob Albrecht was a 

casualty of the U.S. Postal Service and the Holiday 

mail crunch. It will resume next month. 



Product Reviews 



BT1000 Interface 198 

Cassette Holder 147 

Color Scarfman 189 

CoCo Slots 196 

Disk Double Entry 70 

Donkey King 152 

Doodlebug 162 

Dunkey Munkey 152 

Expansion Interface 198 

FLEX Revisited 160 

Fundgraf 187 

Game Pak 2 163 

Game Show 174 

Jumps 164 

Laser Tank 159 

Megabug 158 



Missile Barrage 183 

Money 154 

Moptown/Z)oA? Inman 183 

Pinball 158 

Printer Stand 147 

Small Business Accounting 

Package 70 

Solo Pool 162 

Spectrum Paddle 134 

Spider 160 

Spider Attack 160 

Star Trench Warfare 168 

Sub Mission 165 

UP-1 121 

X Pad/ Paul Hoffman 84 

With programs and a tutorial 



he Rainbow 



Lawrence C. 

Editor 



FaJk 



NEXT MONTH: Our favorite biology professor, Dr. Lane Lester, will dissect your 
income tax and provide a program that will help you do your own on CoCo. 

Also, a really great program that will allow you to control the speed your listings scroll on 
the screen by using your joystick. 

PLUS . . . More programs, tutorials and reviews on CoCo than you can find anywhere! 
Don't miss the February issue! 



James E Reed 
. Managing ScfMOf 

Courtney Noe 
Associate Editor 

SaiJy Nichols ■= 
Art Director 

Anne Yeiser 
Production Coordinator 

Bob Alfarecht 

Steve Blyn 

Don J h man : 

-Joseph Kojar 

Dennis Lewandowski 

Bill Noten ' 

Charles Roslund 

Dick White 

Contributing Bettors 

Patricia H, Hirsch 

General Manager 

!v&nk$ Kleier 
Customer Service Manager 

Monica Wheat 
Research Assistant 

Wendy Faik 
. :. Transportation 

The Rainbow is published every month of 
the year by FALSQFT, INCv 5803 Timber 
Ridjg«::Orive, P.O, Box 209. Prospect, KY, 
40&5& Phone {502} 226-4492. The RAINBOW 

and I he Rainbow logo types, are « Trademarks 
of FALSOFT .inc. 

Entire contents ® by FALSOFT, inc., 19S&: 
The RAINBOW >a intended for the private use 
and pieasure of its subscribers and 
purchasers.' and reproduction byialny nieans is 
.prohibited. Use of information 'herein is for 
the single end use of purchasers antf any 
ioth&r other use fs expressly prohibited. All 
ipr.ograms herein are distributed m art: "as (s£ 
i^asis, without warranty' of any kind 
^whatsoever, 

hi^TRS-fiu, Color Basic, extended. Color 
;B&SiC, Scrip-sif and Program Pak are * 
^trademarks of the Tandy Corp. CompuServe 
Ife a £ : Trademark of Do w ; Jones, inc. 

Subscriptions to the RAINBOW are $22 per 
year Jn. the United States, Canadian and 
Mexican rates a^e U.S. $29. Surface matlio 
(.Hher countries is U.S : "$39 t 'air.mat.l U.S. $S£;i 
;Alf .: $\iivA captions begm . with the next 
avaHable. iasue. 

Llraiftsd back tssues are available for US. 
$Z. for numbers 1-7 fjamiary, 1932), US, 
$230 for numbers B-U. \ August 19B2rand : 
U:S; $295 for 15 upward Except October, 
1.&6&. Which is out of print. Shipping and 
nanolFhQ costs .of $3.50' must be added For 
UPS {ptease furnish street address only) or 
U.S. $6forU AJtfalH and to points outstde the 
United States). Pay men? acceded by VISA, 
MasterCard, Gash/CJheck or Money Order in 
United States currency only. 
!■ -i . . , |, 



letters to 



RAINBOW 



KUDOS FOR US 



Editor: 

I have watched in utter amazement as the 
Rainbow has continued to grow and become 
the resource for the CoCo. My only 
complaint is that it has grown so fat that I 
simply cannot absorb all the information 
you publish in just one month. 

I have never written to a magazine before, 
but I think (and hope) that you know that I 
am but one of many who must tell you every 
month what a great publication yours is. It is 
"the Bible" of the Color Computer world 
and I am pleased, as one of your initial 
subscribers, that I was able to — in effect — be 
in on the "creation." 

The Rainbow isn't just the best Color 
Computer magazine I've ever seen. I think 
it's the best computer magazine I've ever 
been fortunate enough to read. 

I know a lot of others feel this way. How 
come you don't print more letters from them 
in your Letters column? You should get your 
share of praise, too. I can't believe you get 
only a few laudatory letters every month. 
James Charles 
Manchester, NH 

Editor's Note: I guess we blush and 
say many thanks, Mr. Charles. But, to 
answer your question, we do get quite 
a number of letters which say good 
things about the Rainbow and we 
print some of them, but nothing like 
all of them. The staff here very much 
appreciates all your good thoughts. 
But, frankly, we try to make our 
Letters column a source of news and 
information exchange— not a "puff 
place" for the magazine. 



KEEP THE MACHINE OILED 

Editor: 

This is to express my extreme satisfaction 
with "Charlie's Machine." 

Thanks to Mr. Roslund's Minimon and 
Auto Repeat programs, I have learned much 
more about the workings of the Color 
Computer. The programs in this column are 
among the few which I take the time to type 
in. I look forward each month to reading his 
column and hope that it will continue to 
provide readers with a glimpse at machine 
language programming. 

Anthony Byorick 
Biloxi, MS 

HEATS ON AGAIN 

Editor: 

Please add my nameto the list ofall others 
who have asked for a "Beginner's "column in 

6 the RAINBOW January, 1983 



your fantastic magazine. 

A beginner's question: How long can you 
turn on — and turn off — an 80C without any 
harm to the machine? 

Yves Bourgon 
Lauzon, Quebec 

Editor's Note: As to how long you can 
keep CoCo on, look at the letter 
below, but we would not advise it. 
There shouldn't be a practical limit to 
the amount of time you can keep it 
on— in terms of your use. We would 
not keep it on for days and days, 
though. 

As to the beginner's column, see 
Dick White's new Bits and Bytes this 
month and Joe Kolar's Basic 
Training, which began last month. 



Editor: 

I keep reading about heat problems with 
CoCo, and ads for LEDs to tell you when it's 
on or off. I've had my CoCo for about two 
years, and the only time it's shut offis when I 
go on vacation. I have the Radio Shack 32K 
upgrade, no disk, and have never had a 
problem with my machine. 

Given the facts, what reason would there 
be to shut it off after each use? 

Your magazine is great, keep up the good 
work. 

Arnold Brager 
Las Vegas, NV 

A LOT OF BARRELS 

Editor: 

I have scored 112,500 points on 

DUN KEY MUNKEY and I was wondering 

if anybody has a score that beats that score. 

Jar rod Hollinghead 

Biloxi, MS 



A RAINBOW INDEX? 

Editor: 

When my husband and I bought our80C 
last winter we knew that there wasn't a great 
deal of software available. We also realized 
that it would be only a matter of time until 
the software was written. We were delighted 
to discover your magazine and are thrilled 
with the progress it has made in a year. 

Is there any plan to include an index in 
one issue a year that would cover the year 
past? If not, we plan to use the UNIDA TFL 
program which was in your June issue to 
index articles and programs for our own use. 

Thank you for a great magazine. 

Barbara Gill 
Remlik, VA 



Editor's Note: We do plan an index 
one of these days. Honestly, we have 
been so busy publishing the magazine 
that we just have not had time for an 
index. But we will. In the meantime, 
we understand that the UNIDATFL 
program sold commercially includes 
an index to the Rainbow ■, at least for 
the first year. 



HATS OFF FOR HELP 

Editor: 

Some good news! 

One of your loyal readers saw the article 
on Color Disk Scripsit and figured out the 
problems I was having with my printer and 
the program. 

My hat is off to Mr. Gordon Black of 
Pittsburgh, Pa. Gordon reasoned out the 
problem and called me long distance to offer 
the solution. 

The program is coded to run on the "7-bit" 
pattern (1.0 chip). My computer has the 1.1 
chip, so it was necessary to re-program the 
printer to accept only 7 bits. 

His solution works! I guess this really 
proves that readers of the Rainbow are the 
smartest and most helpful to other CoCo 
users. (The graphic screen problem is still 
with me, but another reader may have that 
answer, so I am not concerned.) 

Robert E. Foiles 
Lancaster, PA 



BOUQUETS AND BRICKBATS 

Editor: 

I now have 32K thanks to J ARB software. 
This is a very good 16/32K upgrade kit. 
Why? First class parts. And the best 
instructions you will find anywhere. 

C. Whitfield 
Baltimore, MD 



Editor: 

I have a few remarks which may be of 
interest to other readers of your very 
informative magazine: 

1) For those who have early model 
computers and disks: when I connected my 
drive I got not only the screen interference 
about which Radio Shack warns, but also a 
number of disk 10 errors about which Radio 
Shack does not warn you. When I brought 
the computer in for the grounding (which 
RS will do for free) I not only got away from 
the interference, but the 10 errors were 
cured too. 

2) A further note on TELEWRITER: Yes, 



it's as good as the reviews say. I've been using 
it for several months now and have had only 
two minor problems. Once the print-output 
out garbage from somewhere instead of a 
line feed, although this corrected itself the 
second time I printed it. The second problem 
is that I have never been able to get the 
embedded font change to work — that's the 
command in the text which allows the use of 
different fonts without messing with the 
printer. I don't use thisfeatureagreatdeal — 
but I might if it worked — so it isn't a big 
problem. The big problem, though, is that I 
wrote to Cognitec about these problems 
twice, one month ago and two months ago, 
and haven't gotten a reply to either letter. I 
recall the reviews I read saying how helpful 
the people at Cognitec were, and I just hope 
that they don't reserve their helpfulness for 
magazine reviewers. If you plan to use the 
embedded font commands, or if you don't 
like the feeling that once you've bought it 
you're on your own, you might keep this in 
mind, although I don't know of another 
editor with all these features. 

Now, is anyone else having their disk 
drives write over parts of their saved 
programs? 

Duff Kennedy 
Santa Barbara, CA 



Editor: 

The reason for my letter is to relate an 
experience I had recently with one of your 
advertisers. On page 94 of the September 
issue is an ad for Snake Mountain Software. 
They advertise a software called The 
Solution. At a price of $12.95 I was a bit 
skeptical about it doing everything they say 
it will do. After several weeks of mulling it 
over, on Monday, the first of November, I 
sent my hard-earned money off to North 
Carolina. One week, to the day, later my The 
Solution arrived. I cannot put in words how 
much more enjoyable it is now to use my 
CoCo. The program is everything the ad 
says it is and is, in my opinion, the greatest 
bargain in software for the Color Computer 
that I have seen. 

By the way, I'm using an NEC green 
screen monitor with the above software and 
now my little CoCo looks just like one of the 
"Big Boy" computers. 

Harvey A. Dapeer 
San Antonio, TX 



Editor: 

Spectral Associates has some excellent 
software, yet one of the most innovative and 
addictive games I've come across yet is their 
non-M.L., non-hi-res, 16K offering called 
"Eyewitness." 

The game is a sort of observation test for 
up to four players, and is never the same 
twice in a row. I'll bet that after all the shoot- 
em-ups are retired to mildew away in their 
cassette racks, the owner of this game will 
still be CLOAD'ing regularly. (Especially 
when friends drop in with a six-pack!) 

For only about 12 bucks the game comes 
with a unique solitare game called 
"KLONDIKE." 

A I Piscitelli 
East Haven, CT 



GHOST IN THE PRINTER? 

Editor: 

While recently playing a game of GHOST 
GOBBLER, with my printer (Epson MX-80 
F/T) on, a line of garbage got printed as I ate 
a ghost. Testing later it happened again 
when I ate a ghost. But not at the same 
screen or score. I think it depends on how 
you eat the monsters, any ideas? 

Also, there is a Color BBS in our area that 
just opened up. I have not had a chance to 
downloadanything, but there is a download 
section for Color Computers I know. The 
number is (716) 889-4473 from Rochester, 
NY. 

Congratulations on a fine magazine! I 
plan to renew my subscriptions until I'm 
broke! 

Doug Tooms 
Rochester, NY 



PROGRESS BACKWARDS 

Editor: 

Up until the day I received the November 
issue of the Rainbow, I had thought you 
were making tremendous progress. Then I 
plucked the November issue from my 
mailbox and discovered something had 
happened. 

That issue had shrunken mightily from 
the previous issues, back to the size of the 
first ones. Even worse, when I opened the 
magazine I discovered someone had 
forgotten to count. The page numbers 
jumped from 4 to 135. Surely this could not 
be the fault of the careful postal workers, 
who ensure that each piece of mail, 
especially magazines, reach the subscriber in 
mint condition. 

Virginia Lepley 
Tallahassee, FL 

Editor's Note: We hope this will not 
be a problem any more, now that we 
have gone to "perfect binding". But, 
please, let us repeat that we do send 
out every magazine every month and 
that if you have some problems with 
delivery, complain long, bitterly and 
loud to your local postal authorities. 
And, if your issue does not arrive by 
the 25th of the month, drop us a card. 
We'll replace it even though it is 
usually not our fault. The exception to 
this is if you have moved and did not 
notify us. Then, we're forced to charge 
you for the replacement copy. 



CLUBS, CLUBS, CLUBS 

Editor: 

The Willamette Valley Color Computer 
Users meet every 4th Tuesday of the month 
in Room F-58 of Churchill High School. 
For more information contact Brian James, 
WVCCU, Churchill High School, 1850 
Bailey Hill Road, Eugene, OR 97405. 

Brian James 
Eugene, OR 

Editor: 

I would very much appreciate it if you 
would inform your readers in Canada that 



there is a new Color Computer Users Group 
in Burlington, Ontario. We meet once a 
month at the Burlington Central Arena on 
Drury Lane, from 7 p.m. to 1 1 p.m. Anyone 
requiring more information may call or 
write meat (416) 639-3812, 1249Northshore 
Blvd., Apt. 1005, Burlington, Ontario, L7S 
IC4. 

Brent Bogle 
Burlington, Ontario 

Editor: 

I would like to announce the formation of 
a CoCo club on the south shore of Montreal. 
For information write to 1686 PI. Dauphin 
Chambly P.Q., Canada, J3L 4M7, or phone 
658-3087. 

Pierre Berthiaume 
Chambly, Quebec 



Editor: 

Please announce the existence of the 
ALGOMA Color Computer Club. We now 
have 20 members and have only been in 
existence for three months. The club meets 
at the Sacred Heart School in Sault Ste. 
Marie, Ontario, on the First Thursday and 
the Third Tuesday every month at 7 p.m. I 
am the secretary and can be reached at P.O. 
Box 250, Echo Bay, Ontario, P0S 1C0. 

Jim Payette 
Echo Bay, 



Editor: 

I would like to announce the formation of 
the Jacksonville ColorComputerClub. For 
more information call Bill Brown at 721- 
0282 or write to me at 2411 Hirsch Ave., 
Jacksonville, FL 32216. 

William H. Brown HI 
Jacksonville, FL 



Editor: 

We are trying to form a CoCo Club in 
Columbia, S.C. People can contact me at 
6016 Yorkshire Drive, Columbia, S.C. 
29209. 

Ed Sehlhorst 
Columbia, SC 



Editor: 

Would you please publish that a Color 
Computer User's Group has been formed in 
Philadelphia in conjunction with PACS — 
Philadelphia Area Computer Society? 

It meets the third Saturday of each month 
at LaSalle College at 20th Street and Olney 
Avenue. Anyone wishing information may 
contact me at 567-4276 or Apt. 1626 
Kennedy House, 1901 J. F. Kennedy Blvd., 
Philadelphia 19103. 

A. Arnold Weiss 
Philadelphia, PA 



PRICE INCREASE 

Editor: 

According to your November issue, the 
Rainbow is going to increase its subscription 
rates! 

I can't say I blame you — can't imagine 

how you have packed so much into your 

January, 1983 the RAINBOW 7 



issues so long! Though I am very much a 
beginner to the Computer Age, and at my 
age I feel like it is a foreign world, I am 
enjoying the challenge. And, your magazine 
has been a tremendous help. I immediately 
sent for all back issues. So, I do appreciate 
your growth and understand the price 
increase. As long as your content maintains 
the quality you started, no one should 
complain about the price! 

Priscilla A. Hall 
Hampton, N H 



LIKES RAINBOW TAPE 

Editor: 

I've received the May, June and July 
Rainbow On Tape, and I'm very satisfied 
with the quality. John Waclo's NFL 
programsareanexcellent piece of work. The 
Universal Data File program from June 
doesn't work properly — doesn't sort and 
loses the file sometimes after it is accessed. 
The TESTEM program from May has 
worked well and will be used much this 
school year. 

I would like to see an article covering all 
the programming utilities, comparing their 
features, etc. I'm getting confused by all the 
competing advertisements for these 
programs. 

Is there a possible scandal involving the 
quality of the 80C Disk Drive? Do you get 
much negative feedback about bad drives? 
I've seen some letters to you and others, and 
you had an item presumably from Radio 
Shack that indicated the early drives may 
have been lemons. I ask because I've got one 
and still have it. I hope to make an exchange 
with RS but it hasn't happened yet. Are the 
newer drives better? Is there a "Brand X" 
substitute available? 

Some tips about the 80C Disk Drive I've 
picked up: Use an ink or typewriter eraser on 
the ROM contacts to clean off the tarnish 
which clears up the most common problems. 
When having trouble formatting a disk, 
liberally use a bulk eraser. You may have to 
use it more than once to get the DSK INIO to 
work. 

Your publication has constantly 
improved and I look forward to it each 
month. Keep up the good work. 

H. Richard Pearce 
Havertown, PA 

Editor's Note: Your VNIDATFL 
problems should have been cleared up 
with the corrections we printed and 
Arnold Weiss' reprise on the program. 

We know of no "scandal" involving 
the Radio Shack drives. Some of the 
earlier ones had some problems which 
were, to the best we have been able to 
tell, fixed by Radio Shack at no 
charge. By the way, your tips on 
cleaning the contacts are something 
everyone should heed. It is a good and 
inexpensive way to clear up most of 
the problems associated with disk 
drives. As to a "Brand X" drive, no 
one has seen fit to ask us to evaluate 
their product. There might be a reason 
for that. 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



Editor's Notes... 



PRINT #-2, 



As you can see, some of the changes which we said we would be making to the 
Rainbow are coming to pass both a month ago and this month. 

One of the more evident changes was a month ago when we went to a square- 
back magazine. It is called "perfect" binding and the reason that we did so was 
because we have just grown so rapidly that we were not able to staple the 
magazine any more. Besides, we hope that it will make it easier for you to find the 
Rainbow on your shelves now that you will be able to see the cover date on the 
spine. 

Another change occurs this month, the advent of so-called "slick"pages. We 
know that some of you have written that you prefer the non-glossy pages that we 
had been using because light seemed to reflect on the kind that we are using in 
this issue. Also, several of you had commented that "slick" pages tend to rub off 
and get messy. 

In going to these pages, we hope to dress the Rainbow up a little more than has 
been the case in the past. We are aware of the possible reflection problem, and 
hope that you will let us know your reaction to it, especially in contrast to the 
nice way that the magazine actually looks. 

As to ink smears, we think we have eliminated that problem. Our printer runs 

each page through a varnish as it comes off 
the press and then fast-drys it. This, in effect, 
leaves a coating on the pages that should 
make them resistant to smears. There may be 
a little, but we are advised that it won't be 
significant, if it occurs at all. Sure, this costs 
us a little more, but we are most willing to do 
it to make sure you — our readers — do not 
have problems with ink smears. 

Another thing which (I hope) is evident is a 
new design inside. We had pretty much been 
going along doing design on an ad hoc basis, 
but now we have a real designer and artist on 
I permanent staff. One of her first duties was to 
redesign (actually, design for the first time) 
the magazine. We hope that what we've done 
will make it easier for you to read and use. Let 
I us know your thoughts and reactions. 

And, I hopethatby now(I'msureyou don't 
turn to this column first off) you have noticed 
what we feel is a Rainbow first: The first color centerfold ever to run in a 
computer magazine! We wanted to do something special for the Adventure 
Contest Issue — so we commissioned Fred Crawford to do the poster which 
appears in the center. You can tear it out easily and we hope it will decorate the 
wall of your CoCo room while you type in the listings for our two winning 
Adventures. By the way, Fred also did the cover this month and I am sure you 
will admit that he's a really talented artist. Expect to be seeing more of his work 
in the Rainbow. 

I hope that you noticed, too, the little boxes with the RAINBOW CHEK on 
each program of any length that we have listed. This is going to be a permanent 
feature. Dennis Lewandowski, our Assembly Language columnist, wrote this 
utility to help you enter in programs without error. 

We have gone to the trouble to copyright the program and trademark the 
name. That's really not important. What is important, however, is that we will 
willingly make available the RAINBOW CHEK program to any other 
publication that wishes to use it. Its sole purpose is to make it easier for you to 
key programs into CoCo without making typing errors. We are hopeful others 
will use it so that we can have a standard way to check programs. 

You can use this in your CoCo Club and User Group newsletters, too. 
Permission to reprint the program is granted here. All you have to do is include 
the notice that the program is © the Rainbow, 1983. And, in using the program to 
publish the actual checks, merely use a trademark symbol ^~ Rainbowchek. 
with the words RAINBOW CHEK the first time you use <$f^~ 
it. A note should appear somewhere saying this is a 
trademark of the Rainbow. We do want to have this 




(Continued On Page 156) 



Basic Training... 

BASICally, It's Organization 
That Counts In A Program 

by Joseph Kolar 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 

If you are up to date with us on all the suggestions we 
made last month, the time has now come for you to organize 
your reference notebooks. 

First of all, why take notes? Why notebooks? You may 
find information of interest that you figure is important, but 
that you are not likely to remember. Write it down! You may 
find information that is not needed at present but you have 
that instinctive feeling that you will need it in the future. 
Write it down! You'll find that if you paraphrase some 
information into your own familiar vocabulary or style, you 
will be more likely to make sense out of it, and thus, 
remember it. Write it down! 

When you get in the habit of putting the vital information 
on paper, you are being creative. You are creating your very 
own personal reference file. 

At this point, you might just as well organize your efforts, 
and there is an inexpensive way to create your personal 
reference file. Purchase four one-subject, spiral bound, 
ruled notebooks. Get one each with a yellow, red, blue, and 
green cover. 

To set up your notebooks, get a black, felt-tipped pen, and 
number each sheet(not each page) in the lower right-hand 
corner. The inside cover should be blank. About an inch in 
from the left edge of the inside cover, rule a double vertical 
line, top to bottom. About an inch from the top, rule a 
double horizontal line. Then at about three-eighths inch 
intervals, draw horizontal lines to the bottom of the cover. 
With a red-tipped felt pen, print 'page' in the upper left-hand 
corner. Then, in the large area to the right of your double 
vertical line, neatly center and print the word "contents." 

On the outside cover, stick a piece of gummed tape 
suitable for labeling (neatly trimmed and centered), an inch 
from the top. Put a second piece of tape over the 
subject/name area, or about one to two inches from the 
bottom of the cover. 

Need I say "Do the same to the other notebooks?" 

When you determine what the contents of a notebook will 
be, (hints), (subroutines), (color hints), (graphics), 
whatever, depending on your own requirements, mark the 
two labels you stuck on the cover. Use a black felt-tipped 
pen for best results. 

The color of the notebook cover will be a color-coded 
hint, giving you a clue as to its contents. 

Let us run through an example that will show how you 
can format your notes. Remember, this is just an idea. You 
should do it in any way that is easy for you and which is 
meaningful to you. 

Use two pens. One that writes in either black or blue and 
one that writes in red. In black ink, print a title that has 
meaning to you, centered, on the top line of the page you 
numbered with a one. 

Skip a line and, starting at the red vertical line, print an 
opening statement, if any. Then skip a line and print the title 
of the book, for instance, "example". Skip a line and, using 
the red pen, print in the lines of your program or subroutine. 
To the left of the red vertical line, print the line number, and 
then print the contents of the line to the right of the vertical 
red line. When you are finished, look over your handiwork, 
making sure it is accurately copied. Underline in black 
anything you believe needs special emphasis. 

Skip a line and use the black pen to explain what you did, 



and what its significance is to you. Use words that are 
meaningful to you. 

Here is a sample of what I mean. I thought it would be 
good to keep it for a reference, since I was not likely to 
memorize it. I copied it from some publication long 
forgotten. 

RANDOMIZE 

On start-up, the computer will give the same sequence of 
random numbers each time it is started up. This may not be 
desirable in some instances. 
EXAMPLE: 

10 REM (RANDOMIZE) TEST PROGRAM 

20 PRINT "RANDOMIZE" 

30 FOR X = 1 TO 8 

40 PRINT RND(O) 

50 NEXT X 

100 END 

Change line 20 and add lines 22 to 28 

20 PRINT "ENTER WHOLE NUMBER (SEED) FOR 
RND"; 
22 INPUT S 
24 FOR I = I TO S 
26 X=RND(0) 
28 NEXT I 

NOTE: This should cause a new generation of random 
numbers for the (RND) function each time the program is 
run. Run the program a few times using different numbers. 
Since, every time the computer is started up, the same 
sequence of numbers is generated; the top of the list of 
random numbers is "thrown away" and the list starts with 
the (S+I) entry. 

If you need more space for your notes, continue on the 
reverse of Page I. You may want to print a reference at the 
bottom line to show from which source you copied the 
notes, especially if you extracted it from a longer article. For 
example: (Rainbow, Pg. 70, Feb. 82). 

When the whole thing is completed to your satisfaction, 
go to the inside cover. With a black pen enter the page 
number, and under the 'contents' enter the title or some 
other words that are meaningful to you. By the way, there 
are other ways to generate different starting numbers, but I 
wanted this down on paper for my own interest and benefit. 

To review briefly, you will find lots of things of interest 
that will catch your eye when reading magazines such as the 
Rainbow, or Radio Shack's TRS-80 Microcomputer News. 
You will also notice interesting items when you are keying 
(or typing) in programs, or some interesting subroutines 
that you may want to have available for future reference. If 
you want to keep a record of them, you now know what to 
do. Write it up in the appropriate color-coded notebook, 
preferably using your own words. 

There is one other reference tool you will want, but it 
properly belongs to the subject of the next article. Purchase 
one more notebook, but don't set it up. 

If you have any notes, now is the time to give them a 
permanent home. So, take some time out from computing, 
get your reference volumes organized, and you'll have fun! 
Fun? Congratulations! You have just begun the process of 
writing your personal reference library in a painless manner. 
You didn't know you could write a book, did you? Well, 
look what computing has done. It made you an author! 
That's pretty good. 

Next month we'll talk about organizing your tapes, and 
since organization is the key to creative freedom, please stay 
with us. It will all help you to have fun doing your thing on 
the keyboard. /7^\ 



10 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 




Bits & Bytes of Basic 



I look for this to be an on-going column on a variety of 
Basic Language topics. We will talk about some things that 
are in the manuals, perhaps in a middle section that you have 
not gotten around to reading. More interesting, and equally 
useful, will be some investigations of ways to use commands 
and statements that are not in the manuals. And we will 
digress to discuss some non-code issues like the place of 
Basic among other languages, programming practices, 
program structure and the like. While I probably will not be 
able to answer readers' questions personally, those directed 
to me through the Rainbow will impact the selection of 
topics for the column. 

Basic is a controversial language. Computer scientists 
evil-eye and bad-mouth Basic, yet virtually all standard 
microcomputers come with a Basic Interpreter. Who is not 
getting what message? Or thumb through the Rainbow and 
note the information and ads on other languages. There is an 
assembly language column. Ads for Pascal and Forth speak 
of structured programming and program speed. Thumb 
through other computer magazines, particularly those for 
older systems, and note the variety of programming 
languages available, each claiming significant benefits to the 
user. Yet it is no accident your 80C comes with Basic. 

As initially devised at Dartmouth, Basic was designed for 
use in teaching programming. The language was interpreted 
so that the code could be run quickly and the students could 
get rapid feedback on the results of their efforts. The 
language used memory economically, a major virtue when 
memory is scarce and expensive. In the 60's and 70's, Basic 
came under attack as memory constraints loosened and 
structured programming concepts were developed, designed 
to make programs more easily debugged and changed. 
Pascal and PL-1, to name two examples, are designed to 
force structuring on the user. Basic does not require much of 
the user except correct syntax. One can write a totally 
confusing Basic program that will work. 

The advent of the microcomputer forced a choice of 
language. About the time the fathers of the Apple were 
designing hardware in a garage in California, pirated copies 
of a new Basic Interpreter were circulating in the same area. 
Only six years ago, memory for a microcomputer was costly. 
In addition, a microcomputer is highly interactive with its 
user. Basic was the perfect choice for the language for the 
new machines. The pirated Basic Interpreter was good 
enough that its author was found and contracts entered. 
Obviously, one does not put stolen software in a commercial 



The Use of Basic: Some 
Weaknesses, Some Solutions 



by Richard A. White 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



computer if one is shooting for the big time. Thus, Microsoft 
came into being by supplying a better Basic. Their Basic in 
80C is the best yet for an eight-bit microcomputer, and 
corrects some of the faults previously found with Basic. 

Still, Extended Color Basic can be slow. If you just start 
writing without program planning, you can still end up with 
a spaghetti program that will be indecipherable a week after 
you write it. In big programs you will still have trouble 
keeping track of what variables you used for what and 
where. But with care and planning, Basic will serve a large 
number of needs. The key is to use it right, and this takes 
experience. 

Program structure means program organization. Some 
languages require that variables, files, data structures and 
other attributes be declared at the beginning. Generous use 
of remarks is encouraged, and specific indentation formats 
are strongly suggested. Structuring also deals with what 
should be in subroutines, what should be in the main 
procedure and how the procedures flow. Much of this is 
optional in Basic; some isjustgood practice in any language. 

Clarity should be as important a goal in Basic as it is in 
other languages. There are a number of ways to write clear 
programs. I use the procedures that follow and find them 
valuable. 

1. Define specific program functions and put the code for 
each function in its own module with introductory REM's. 
Assign a specific set of lines to a module. Blocks of 100 lines 
are convenient and will meet most needs. You will always 
know a module begins at an even hundred and can go right 
to the one you want. But this uses memory and slows 
program execution. Here we can have our cake and eat it, 
too, by using one of the utility programs advertized in the 
Rainbow to strip out spaces and REM. Then use RENUM 
to renumber starting at line in single line increments. Call 
your original the "Source," to be used when making changes 
while the compressed program is the version to run. 

2. Minimize looping back. The procedure should flow from 
start to end and loop only to repeat the routine or a portion 
of it. 

3. Use IF. ..THEN. ..ELSE to minimize jumping forward. 
Many times all the code for the choices can be contained 
after THEN and ELSE on one line, so that the procedure 
can continue on the next line. Some forms of Basic don't 
have ELSE. Apple doesn't and Apple owners pay extra for 
the lack. To illustrate, which is clearer to you? 



12 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



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Master Control is a Machine 
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• Automatic line numbering, 
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• Directcontrol of motor, trace 
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Load Master Control into 
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DUNKEY 
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By Intellectronics 

You (Luigi) are controlled 
by the joystick to move right, 
left, climb up and down ladders 
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Watch out for the rolling 
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Tape $24.95 

Disk $29.95 

KEYS of the 
WIZARD 

By Spectral Associates 

Keys of the Wizard is a fast- 
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CERTIFICATION 

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10 If X=0 THEN PRINT 
TRUE" 
20 END 



FALSE": X=l ELSE PRINT 



10IFX=OTHEN 30 

20 PRINT "TRUE": X=l: GOTO40 

30 PRINT "FALSE" 

40 END 

4. Put all subroutines in one of two places. Frequently 
called subroutines, including those that affect program 
speed, should be at the front of the program. I reserve lines 5 
to 99 for these. These should not be more than three or four 
lines. Line number spacing of two is good. Putting 
subroutines here serves two functions. First, the computer 
finds them quickly when speed counts. Second, you save 
bytes, since the number in the GOSUB is only one or two 
bytes long. Infrequently called routines, particularly 
program initialization code, should be at the end of the 
program. Each time a subroutine is called, or the computer 
is sent to a specific line, it starts at the beginning of the 
program and searches until it finds that line. The fewer lnes 
it passes to find the needed line, the faster the search will be. 
It follows that speed is compromized if the computer is 
continually searching over code it has used and will not use 
again. Clarity comes from having only two places to look for 
subroutine at the end of the module that calls it when only 
that module uses it. 

5. The same reasoning used above also applies to the 
ordering of main program modules, provided they are called 
separately. Those used most frequently are put in front of 
the occasionally-used ones. In a file program, the input 
module is used far more than the save-to-tape or disk 
module, and should come to the front. Modules that are 
used in order should be placed in order in the program. 

6. Menus should be placed where they are used in the 
program. A menu's text provides valuable information on 
the branching of the program that follows. If menu choices 
are numbered from one, up in sequence, the ON I GOTO 
XXX,YYY,ZZZ or ON I GOSUB XXX f YYY,ZZZ 
commands can be used. It is easy to read a listing, see which 
number corresponds to the code block you want, and then 
drop down to the ON I statement and count across to find 
the target line number. Memory conservation sometimes 
forces use of strings defined elsewhere in the program in 
menu text. When this is done, the advantage of reading the 
menu code to know what options are there, and where to go 
for their code, is lost. Programming is a series of 
compromises. It is up to you to know what your options are, 
and to make sure that your choices are educated ones and 
not guesses or blind repetition of past practices. 

Though I introduced program structuring for purposes of 
easy trouble shooting and modification, the proposed 
structure facilitates program speed, as well. Memory use 
was another consideration. Clarity, memory, and speed are 
like three corners of a triangle. You cannot be at all three 
points at once. You can, however, make choices that shorten 
the sides of the triangle and get you close to where you want 
to be. It takes careful thought and planning at the start, so 
you don't end up redoing too much. Don't be upset when 
you don't get what you want the first or second time. 
Remember, all good commercial programs have version 
numbers, and Version 1 .0 is the first one offered for sale, not 
the first one of the development process. <jf^\ 



14 the RAINBOW January, 1983 



The Dragon's Byte 

Create A Character 
File Program 

By Bill Nolan 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 

(Mr, Nolan, an experienced Dungeonmaster in a popular fantasy role 
playing game on a weekly basis, is the president of Prickly-Pear 
Software.) 

Well, the holidays are over, and some of us survived the 
ordeal! I'm glad to see you are all back here with me again in 
1983, and I want to take this opportunity to congratulate the 
Rainbow on a super December issue. Very impressive, Mr. 
Falk! 

This month we will talk about how to create a program 
which will help you store and update all of the information 
needed to keep track of a fantasy character. We will start at 
the very beginning on this one so you can watch the program 
take shape. Whenever you decide to write a new program, 
the first thing you need to do is determine exactly what you 
want the program to accomplish for you. This step is often 
skipped, and is the reason so many programs seem to have 
been written in a vacuum. 

Remember, the most important thing when writing a 
program is knowledge of the problem you want solved. 
Knowledge of the computer and programming technique 
are far less important! In other words, don't let yourself be 
intimidated by the computer. Just look at how much bigger 
you are ! 

Also, don't let yourself be intimidated by those who 
would have you believe there is only one way to write a basic 



program. Usually these people will refer to a nebulous 
concept called "structure," and imply (or state openly) that if 
a program lacks "structure" it is somehow sinful. 

Programming can be approached (and taught) as either a 
science or an art, and those who teach it as an art encourage 
their students to develop their own style, and thus their own 
distinctive "structure." A uniformity of style or structure is 
only important in two settings. If you are a student in a 
programming class, the instructor needs all work handed in 
to be similar in structure. Otherwise grading would be a 
nightmare. Those of you who work closely with other 
programmers will also need to write with a similar style, 
because the parts will not blend together easily unless you 
do. 

The great majority of you are not in either of these 
situations, though, and are not so heavily constricted as to 
style. Basic is a language, and there are many authors who 
use it effectively, just as many authors use English 
effectively, although their individual styles may differ 
wildly. So, avoid using GOTO (as the advocates of 
"structure" recommend) if it causes you problems, but if it 
doesn't, don't worry about it. 

Now, what do we want accomplished by our character 
record program? First, we have to store the character's 
name, ability scores, and other basic stats. It would be a 
good idea to be able to keep a complete list of possessions 
and money, and we will certainly need to keep track of magic 
items and the charges they have remaining. 

We will want to be able to keep track of level, hit points 
and injuries, and if the character has special abilities such as 
magic spell use or thieving abilities, we will want to keep 
track of these, also. If we are to make this complete, we will 
need to know about proficiency with various weapons and 




GET YOUR BUGS 

OFF YOUR HANDS. 






Bugs ^m% in your programs can really get under your skin. Especially when they've 
been bugging you for longer than you'd like to think. 

So get your bugs off your hands. And onto somebody else's. 
Pack them off to DeBug. (On cassette, thank you.) With a description of where you 
were going. And where you got stuck. If it's an interesting enough program, we'll send it to 
people who like to stomp on other people's bugs. 

If somebody can get all the bugs out of your 16K Extended Basic CoCo program 

we'll try to sell it. And everyone shares the profits, 

Send $5 per entry. Or $9 for a sample cassette of 
20 or so very buggy programs. Or $12 for both. 

114 West Central St. 
Natick, MA 01760 




DEBUG 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 15 



saving throws, and I'm sure more things will come to mind 
as we go along. 

Once we have all this information in the computer, we will 
need to be able to manipulate it in various ways. We will 
want to be able to save it to tape or disk, or output it to a 




printer, and we will want to be able to examine and change 
any item as desired. Since we will want to be able to jump 
easily to any part of the program quickly, we will want to 
have some kind of a "menu" of program functions available. 

Once we have decided what we want the program to 
accomplish, we can decide how we want to organize it. 
When writing a fairly complex program like this one, I find 
it helpful to divide it up into a bunch of little programs, and 
then write each one separately. In this case, for example, we 
could write a program starting at line number 10 that will 
print the menu on the screen and then get our input from the 
keyboard before branching {GOTO or GOSUB) to one of 
the other sub-programs. 

Then, we could write another little program at line 



number 1000 to allow us to start a new character record 
from scratch; one at line number 2000 to load an existing 
character from tape or disk; another at line number 3000 to 
save a character out on tape or disk; another at 4000 to 
update the basic stats; another at 5000 to keep track of 
possessions, and so on until our big program does 
everything we want it to do (or we run out of memory). In 
this way, we may end up with a long and complex program, 
but we will only have to write several short and easy 
programs. 

Some things will have to be kept track of while we do all 
this. Start two lists, and keep them up without fail. The first 
is a list of variables used in the program, and the second is a 
list of line numbers where the various sub-programs start. 
These will be necessary as we go along. If you don't already 
have the habit, I also recommend strongly that you start 
now to save a copy of your developing program to tape or 
disk every half hour or so to avoid losing a lot of time in case 
of a power outage or other tragedy. Better yet, save it at least 
twice, on different tapes or disks, and store them in different 
houses (in case of fire). 

Next month we will start the actual writing of the 
program, so if you think I'm leaving anything major out of 
the character record program, let me know quickly. I'm sure 
that some things will come to me as soon as I mail this 
column off, but I can use all the help I can get. By the way, 
have you ever noticed how somewritersalwaysuse we when 
referring to themselves alone? I have always been fascinated 
by this, as I assume these people either have royal blood (or a 
mouse in their pocket). 

You can write me at: Prickly-Pear Software, 9822 E. 
Stella Rd.,Tucson, AZ 85730, (602)886-1505. ^ 



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16 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



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(PART TWO OF A THREE-PART SERIES) 



Go Adventuring 
With GAPAD 

by Geoff Wells 

Last month, in the first of this three-part series, we printed 
the general all purpose adventure driver. If you followed the 
suggestions in that article you will now be ready to add your 
own data statements to the program and create your own 
original adventure. We will start with a brief description of 
how the program operates and what each module does. 

After identification and dimensioning, the data 
statements are read into the appropriate arrays, and the 
players' starting location is set at line 90. The code string in 
MC$(X,Y) is pulled apart in line 100 and used to build the 
location description and possible directions allowed. Lines 
110-150 construct the location description (L$) from the 
words and phrases stored in data lines 1000-1999. The 
visible object string (OB$) is built at line 160, and the results 
are printed by the subroutine at 500 (which will print a string 
of any length without splitting words at the end of a line). 
Line 200 waits for input; sequence 210-2 1 1 checks for valid 
one-word commands and directs program flow if one is 
found, 220-320 checks the first and second words to see if 
they are recognized, and line 330 sends the program to the 
area dealing with the first word. Sequence 600-607 takes 
care of direction commands, 610-614 prints the inventory 
and line 650 gives any 'help' you decide the player should get. 
700 and 800 save or load a game in progress. 1000-3600 is 
where you decide what happens for various valid command 



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Editor's note: Last month, in Geoff Wells first installment 
of the GAPAD series, he mentioned some program changes 
which would allow you to run the program and check for 
any typing errors. If you were unable to find the list, we must 
admit it's because we slipped up and forgot to include it 
along with the regular program listing. Geoff called us 
recently from The Data Man, the company he owns in 
Hamilton, Ontario, to kindly bring this to our attention. 
You will find those listing changes with this month's 
Corrections on page 188 . 

combinations. Remember, only valid combinations will 
reach this point. Commands like 'GET RIVER' or 'EAT 

DOOR' have already been eliminated. 

Now we get to the data statements. This will probably 
sound more difficult than it really is, but if you can't follow 
the logic maybe you will be able to sort it all out by referring 
to the completed program in next month's Rainbow. 

The location descriptions are built from words and 
phrases in data lines 10000-19999. The program is presently 
set to add four phrases together but you can change that as 
necessary. Count the total number of elements in each of the 
four groups and put these values in the FOR NEXTloops of 
lines 120-150. Data lines 20000-29999 contain the first three 
letters of the first command words that you wish to 
recognize. The single letter in each data pair is used in line 
330 as the ON GOSUB number. It is also used in line 310 to 
check for compatibility with the second word in the 
command. Note that words of similar meaning such as GET 
and TAKE, or DROP and PUT have the same letter. If you 
make any changes to the list supplied you will have to 
change the DIM FW$(40), FC$(40) in line 10 and the FOR 
NEXT loops in lines 40 and 260. 

Lines 30000-39999 hold the data pairs for the first three 
letters of the second command word and the code letters for 
the first words with which they are compatible. For example 
a lamp can be GOT, DROPPED, and EXAMINEDbut not 
KILLED, so the code letters for lamp would contain A B 
and C but not G. The number of data pairs you are using in 
this group goes into the DIM SW$(##), SC$(##) of line 10 
and the FOR NEXTXooy* in lines 50 and 280. The codes in 
lines 40000-49999 are for the two dimensional array 
M C$(X, Y). The two dimensions are for the map coordinates 
X,Y and are read in columns, with X stepping once f orevery 
column of Y. The first six bits in the code are NSE WUD for 
the directions the player is allowed to move from that 
particular location. If a direction is not permitted, then 
replace the letter with an asterisk. This code can be altered 
during play using MID$ if, for example, a door is opened or 
a passageway cleared. The remainder of the code is used to 
build L$ (location description) from the four data sets 
beginning at line 1000. The two bits of each of the four 
numbers points to the position in the data group of the 
phrase you wish to use. 

The last data group, staring at line 50000 is for the objects 
you will find along your way. There are four elements to 
each group; the X,Y coordinates of the object, read by 
OL($$,0) and OL($$,l). The complete description OD$($$) 
and the object keyword OK$($$). $$ is the total number of 
objects in your game and goes in lines 10, 70, 160, 61 1, and 
1100. 

The number of things a player can carry at one time goes 
into the DIM IN$(%%) line 10 and the NF loop lines 61 1, 
1000,1010, and 1100. All you need now is some code to 
check for a winning situation and your adventure is 
complete. ^ 



18 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 




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Adventure Contest Winners 



And Now... 
The Envelope, Please! 

By Jim Reed 
Rainbow Managing Editor 



Editor's Note: Jim Reed's long-suffering better half, 
Dorris, shares her husband's interest in computers, but is a 
bit worried about the effect of his spending so much time 
with these Adventure programs. 

"He's working them mostly at night — and late at night," 
she reported recently. "He hardly sees the light of day. 

"The TDP couldn't be turning him into a vampire, could 
it?" 



Prom New York to California, Wisconsin to 
Florida.. .from Sawmill Road to the 12000 block of West 
Balboa Drive, from mid-America and central Canada, 
too...from 4K to 32K.. .graphics and non-graphic. ..the 
entries in the first annual Rainbow Adventure Contest came 
in. 

What a variety! A plane crashes in the jungle.. .a love boat 
island hops. ..a carpet flies. ..a horse runs away. ..a Trans Am 
car needs a driver. ..a space station seems to run itself. Throw 
in a heaping helping of creaky old mansions, eerie castles, 
underground tunnels and traps, traps, traps. 

You think judging an adventure contest is easy, do you? 
Well, we've been thrown in pits, bitten by snakes, blown to 
bits by a self-made bomb, flash-fried by dragon breath, 
caught in cobwebs, surrounded by fire, poisoned by arrows, 
needles and spiders, drowned in blood, nibbled on by 
piranha and crocodiles, hacked by an axe, strangled, shot, 
beheaded, eaten alive and brutally slain by every monster 
imaginable: dragons, zombies, lizards, hydras, giants, 
robots, demons, harpies, trolls, wererats, burglars, wizards 
and even ants. Invariably, a replay of an adventurer is 
simply death warmed over. 



The funny thing about all this is that you can hardly wait 
to get your turn at bat, can you? Well, your time is coming- 
in this issue of the Rainbow. For your personal pleasure and 
family entertainment, we have selected from the dealers of 
death the very best architects of annihilation. The envelope, 
please! 

The winners are. ..You! The readers of the Rainbow, for 
we are printing the entire listings on the two top winners' 
programs, the grand prize winner for a graphics adventure 
and the top eliminator, so to speak, for the non-graphics 
division. Heed these words, though: the goblins will surely 
get you, even if you do watch out. So, get your personal 
affairs in order before embarking on this journey to death's 
door, and beyond. 

Well, there are some lighter moments, even when the 
shadow of death darkens your path. Let's see, we seem to 
recall being stung on the nose by a bee, stumping our toe on 
kicking a door, having a carved pumpkin fall on our head, 
being devoured by a man-eating soup can and having an evil 
scientist's experiment turn us into a microwave oven. Your 
kind of fun, you say? Well, read on and we'll give you the 
lowdown on these high adventures. 

Naturally, the love of money is the root of all this evil. 
And, if it's treasure you're after, we have bullion by the 
billion, pearls by the basketful, valuable relics, an emerald 
statue and free hula lessons. There are also fiery diamonds 



that'll singe your fingers, rubies for rubbing, a gold knife 
that's hot merchandise, a sack of marbles and enough red 
herring to divert a hungry bear. But, while we believe wealth 
is its own reward, you'll pay dearly as you search for the pots 
of gold in Rainbow's contest. 

Well, enough hyperbole. Let's talk results. Let's announce 
the winners. Let's distribute the prizes. Let's experience 
these adventure for ourselves. 

We've painstakingly whittled down the numbers to settle 
on a baker's dozen. Here, in alphabetical order, are the 
Lucky Thirteen — all of whom will receive prizes, and from 
whom we have singled out the winners, runners-up and a 
number of special honorable mentions: 

GREGORY CLARK of Syracuse, New York, for Sir 
Randolf of the Moors 

DON DUNLAP of Reynoldsburg, Ohio, for The 
Polynesian Adventure 

CHRIS HARLAND of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, 
for The Deed of the York 

ROBERT W. MANGUM, II of Titusville, Florida, for 
Horror House 

JORGE MIR of New Berlin, Wisconsin, for Dreamer 

JORGE MIR of New Berlin, Wisconsin, for Oneroom 

JUSTIN PAOLA of Berkeley, California, for Search for 
the Ruby Chalice 

GREGORY RICKETTS of Columbus, Ohio, for 
Dungeon Adventure 

JEAN ROSEBOROUGH of New Berlin, Wisconsin, for 
Door 

STEVE SHERRARD of Normal, Illinois, for Dungeon 
Adventure 

SCOTT SLOMIANY of Downer's Grove, Illinois, for 
Dr. Avaloe 

RICK TOWNSEND of Bettendorf, Iowa, for Escape 
from Sparta 

CHRIS WILKINSON of Larchmont, New York, for 
Lighthouse Adventure 

If you're the superstitious type, take note that Jorge Mir's 
name appears twice— he had two entries. So, really, only 12 
people are in the finals. Also, note that two entrants had 
adventures by the same name, Dungeon Adventure (one is 
graphics, one non-graphics), so we only have a total of 12 
titles in the Lucky Thirteen. 

The Lucky Thirteen. Actually, luck had little to do with it. 
These folks all worked long and hard to create their winning 
entries. For their efforts, not only will they receive valuable 
prizes from generous Rainbow advertisers, but each of their 
adventures will be published in the near future. As we said, 
the top winners' games are published in this issue. 

In keeping with the great Miss America contest tradition, 
we'll save the royal coronation for the grand finale. First, 
some special awards and honorable mentions, then the 
runners-up, then the two top winners whose programs are 
listed herein as well as in this month's edition of Rainbow on 
Tape. 

THE SOUNDS OF MUSIC AWARD to Don Dunlap 
for The Polynesian Adventure. Not only musical interludes, 
but music from the islands. Don's entry made excellent use 



20 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



of the 80C's sound capability and also put others to shame 
with his artful use of colors. The Polynesian Adventure was 
not only easy to play, but it did not end the game when you 
screwed up; a slap on the wrist was a much-appreciated 
punishment by our judges who had grown weary indeed of 
having to start many games from the top every time they 
made a fatal mistake. We commend Don for the leniency 
and recommend that more adventure writers consider 
wounds and bruises or other penalties in lieu of crudely and 
rudely ending the program for every little infraction. 

THE DOOR PRIZE (what else?) to Jean Roseborough 
for Door. Ms. Roseborough believes there are 44 ways to 
open doors. Billed as the world's shortest adventure game, 
we recommend this 4K game for children; supply them noun 
and verb lists and let them learn how to spell while they're 
banging their heads and everything else to get the door open. 
(Confidential to JR: How about "Fire!," "Pizza," "Police," 
"Avon Calling," "Meter Man," or "Honey, I'm home." 

BEST SCIENCE FICTION TROPHY to Rick 

Townsend for Escape from Sparta. In this action-packed 
mission, your object is to save your creator. No desecration 
or sacrilege intended, it's just that you are an advanced robot 
yourself and you and all those like you need your creator to 
keep your springs wound and your joints oiled and 
whatever. Trouble is, the evil warlord has captured your 
creator. This is a computer game in which you use the space 
station's computers to get help and to locate the creator. 
And action! We were being shot at by an enemy robot as 
soon as we were beamed aboard. (Confidential to Rick: 
Space Dust, huh! A nice way to treat somebody who 
thought your title page was classy. By the way, your print- 
out of the listing on Radio Shack's graphics printer was 
highly readable; not that we had to peek for help, or 
anything like that.) 



SPOON FEED THEM AWARD to Chris Harland for 
The Deed of the York. Some adventure games seem 
impossible to win, but not this one. You may use up several 
incarnations, but persistence will pay off if you just keep re- 
entering this haunted house to find the hidden deed. If you 
collect even a portion of the clues and still can't find the 
deed, you'd better stick to Pong. A fun game to play, and 
Harland obviously has a warped mind. One minute you 
pinch your finger, the next you're a goner. (Confidential to 
Chris: A pizza delivery to a haunted house? You must know 
Rainbow's creator, Lonnie "plain cheese, lightly cooked" 
Falk. Too bad for you he abstained from the judging; you'd 
have won even bigger.) 

BEST TITLE PAGE CITATION to Robert W. Mangum 
II for Horror House. A lot of work goes into title pages. 
Many are quite artistic. Some move. Some have brilliant 
colors. Some flash. Mangum has it all. Really, you have to 
see it to appreciate it. Have patience; it'll be published before 
long. The judges liked the fact that you can fight the 
monsters in Horror House for a bit and then split if they 
seem to be getting the better of you. You get a blow-by-blow 
report of your own and the monster's condition. 
(Confidential to RWM II: About that vendingmachine that 
says "Drink Creature Cola," we lost a lot of coins in that 
contraption. You know, realism has its drawbacks; that 
machine is too much like the real thing.) 

THE ONE ARM TIED BEHIND YOUR BACK 
MEDAL to Jorge Mir for Oneroom and Dreamer, a 
combination entry created under self-imposed limitations. 
Many of you owe much of what you know about writing 
adventure games to the articles Jorge has authored for the 
Rainbow, and frankly, he took us a bit by surprise in 
entering the contest. But, then, we did make a wide open 




TEXT EDITOR 

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January, 1983 the RAINBOW 



21 



invitation — it wasn't even void in Nebraska. Well, Jorge, the 
mark of a good teacher is to be surpassed by your pupils. In 
effect, though, Jorge took himself out of the running by 
electing to submit the extremes in programming: a 32K 
adventure that never gets out of the original room, and a 4K 
adventure that has 26 rooms. That's right, in Dreamer you 
can visit up to 26 rooms, get in a sword fight, ride a horse, get 
chased by a bear, take a boat ride, explore a cave, and kill 
yourself a half-dozen different ways — all in a 24-line, 4K 
program. On the other hand, in Oneroom, everything you 
need is within easy reach, but don't expect any easy way out. 
While Dreamer is mainly for beginners, Oneroom promises 
to keep the veteran adventurers well contained. 
(Confidential to Jorge: You developed your 32K program 
with "ADVMAKER," didn't you?) 



JORGE'S BEST PUPIL PRIZE to Steve Sherrard for 
Dungeon Adventure. Go to the head of the class, Steve, and 
listen to your high school teachers. It's obvious you've been 
sitting on the back row writing computer programs during 
your English literature and trigonometry classes. Musty 
rooms? Moldy bones? Drunken guards? Oh, to be 16 years 
old, like Steve, again. Dungeon Adventure is a cleanly 
executing game based on a format printed in the July, 1982, 
Rainbow. Not a thing wrong with that; no sense re-inventing 
the wheel when you have a tried and proven format. Special 
praise to Steve for that spacey musical ditty at the end of the 
game. It was very satisfying. Too often, we find that after 
successfully completing an adventure, defying death, 
conquering evil and decimating demons, we get no more 
than "Congratulations!" printed, and then a clear screen. 



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For a change, we get a treat for a job well done. 

RUNNER-UP (Graphics Division) to Scott Slomiany for 
Dr. Avaloe. This is a very interesting entry. It's a two-part 
program, done in a two-part format, calling for two-word 
entires. In Dr. A valoe, you begin inside a complex of rooms, 
and the idea is to get outside, alive. Basically, Dr. Avaloe 
draws you a picture of the room you're in and shows your 
location in the room. Then, you hit ENTER to go to the text 
screen and you enter a two-word command. Then, it's back 
to the graphics screen to see what you accomplished, and so 
forth. Adding a nice touch are the songs that are played as 
you leave every room — and leaving a room is no mean feat, 
by the way. Dr. Avaloe is in ASCII format and takes 
patience to load, but it is a challenge. Words soon to become 
a catch phrase among the judges were: "You died a 
sorrowing death; I hope you had fun, though. Rule #8 was a 
favorite, too. It reads: "Don't do stupid things." We found 
this to mean "Don't do anything the least bit logical," in 
actual play. If you want to leave a room, heading for the 
door is only a last resort. If you find a key, don't expect to 
unlock anything. You get the idea. Why did we climb into 
the coffin when invited? Well, in the convoluted scheme of 
reverse psychology we soon learned to live by, it seemed like 
a bad idea at the time -- so, of course, we did it. 

RUNNERS-UP (Non-graphic Division) A tie! A stand- 
off between the East Coast and the West Coast. After being 
sequestered, browbeaten, and threatened with bodily harm, 
the judges emerged to announce that Justin Paola's Search 
for the Ruby Chalice and Chris Wilkinson's Lighthouse 
Adventure were deadlocked for second place and that was 
that. The Rainbow editors could decide how to divvy up the 
loot. Search for the Ruby Chalice is really fun to play. You 
and your pilot have landed your pontoon plane on a lake in 
the jungle and your objective is to find the ruby chalice and 
escape in one piece. Head hunters! Wild animals! And that 
(expletive deleted) snake that bites you every time you go 
through a key intersection. You can pick up and drop a 
variety of items, but you'd better keep that snake bite kit 
handy. This is an adventure we really "got into." It also 
brought more appreciative laughs than any other game for 
the surprises it offered, such as the memorable "Scream 
from the East." 

Then, there's Lighthouse Adventure, with a pirate's log 
book, a musket, lots of hidden panels/ doors/ clues and a 
huge sea serpent. This co-runner-up adventure is baffling at 
times, but you keep being drawn back to it. It's addictive. 
The first objective is to search the lighthouse and its environs 
to find the gold. But that's only the half of it; then, you have 
to make your getaway, and that's a heavy problem when you 
have tons of bullion. (A semaphore message to Chris 
Wilkinson: The British may jolly well call it a "trolley, but in 
America we call it a "dolly.") 

And now ...TA DA. ..the winners! CONGRAT- 
ULATIONS GREGORY!! And, you can say that again, 
CONGRATULATIONS, GREGORY!!, for both top 
winners are named Gregory. In our eternal search for 
relevance, we note that this announcement comes as the 
Gregorian calendar begins a new year. But enough of this 
Gregorian chant, let's meet the winners. 

In our graphics division, Gregory Ricketts is the grand 
prize winner for his Dungeon Adventure, which features a 
Dungeons and Dragons influence, but is otherwise quite 
unlike anything else the judges have seen. We found it easy 
to understand, exciting to play, and a novelty among 
adventure games. The judges were unanimous in selecting 



22 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



Quality Software Is The 
Number One Priority At 

K & K 
Computorware 







LASER TANK — Pit yourself in a game of strategy and 
excitement against the computer. You must defend your 
flag from attacking tanks and destroy them before they 
destroy your flag or you!!! High resolution graphics and 
four levels of difficulty. Only $14 95 . 

TALEGUNNER — High resolution graphics, extremely fast 
action 3-D effects. This one looks as if it stepped right out 
of the arcade. Are you brave enough to defend your ship 
from attacking rebels? A must for your color computer 
software library. Only $14 95 . 

SHOOT TO SPELL AND FLASH MATH — An educational 
package that helps kids learn to spell and educate them on 
elementary math. An absolute must for adults with school 
aged children. Joysticks required. Only $11 95 . 

SPACE HARVEST — Pilot your spacecraft above the 
Planetoid Voltar stealing spacefruit and trying to avoid 
alien guards and the ground. Fast action machine language 
program with high resolution graphics. Only $14 95 . 

HORSE RACE — Can you pick the next secretariat among 
our thoroughbreds? High speed, life like action for people 
of all ages. High resolution graphics. 16K extended or 32K 
disk. Only $12 95 . 

SERIAL TO PARELLEL CONVERTER — Have a printer with 
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any baud rate between 300 and 9600. Let K & K help your 
printer to go much faster!!! Only $69 95 . 




ii BLACKJACK 



W*WMN 



BLACKJACK — A casino game that puts two players 
against the beady-eyed dealer of the house. This dealer 
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you have any gambling blood at all this game is a must! 
Same rules as any Las Vegas casino. High resolution 
graphics. Only $12 95 . 



r^ 



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POLARIS — You are under the ocean in a submarine, 
attacking planes and enemy destroyers dropping depth 
charges attempting to destroy your sub. Can you destroy 
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action machine language program with high resolution 
graphics. Only $14. 95 

, fa M - 



SUPER ZAP — Enemy spaceships are attacking from all 
sides and your mission, should you choose to accept it, is 
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This will be a dangerous mission since the Pryuss Armada 
has never been defeated by any humanoid. Action 
increases as the game progresses. Only $14 95 . 

BUSINESS PROGRAMS 

INVENTORY CONTROL — This program contains all the 
necessary features required for all types of inventories, 
such as sorting of inventory by stock number. This program 
will list stock number, description, amount in stock, cost, 
wholesale, profits. Minimum 16K disk required. Only $39 95 . 

PROPERTY INVENTORY FOR YOUR BUSINESS — This 
program lists inventory by department, date purchased, 
property numbers. Gives line list of inventory to your line 
printer, also this program has the ability to add and delete 
items. Minimum 16K disk required. Only $29 95 . 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE — This program inputs outgoing 
accounts (name, address, city, state), expenditure payed 
and balance owed. You can also list one account or all 
accounts to the printer. Minimum 16K disk required. Only 
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ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE — This program inputs incoming 
accounts {name, address, city, state), capital received, 
credit limit, date of last payment and lists one or all 
accounts to the printer. You can also insert or delete 
accounts. Minimum 16K disk required. Only $29 95 . 

BOWLING SCORED FOR DOLLARS — Do your leagues 
bowling averages. This program will keep individual scores, 
team totals, individual averages, team standings, and print 
all this information to your line printer. Minimum 16K disk 
required. Only $14 95 . 



ALL GAME PROGRAMS — require 16K extended and joysticks (prices are set for cassette, add $4°° for disk). 

PROGRAMMERS!!! — K & K pays the highest royalties for your programs, if your program is good, send it to K & K and receive the 

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TRS-80 Color Computer Users — This is only a small listing of what we have to offer. New programs are added each week. Send 

$1.00 for our complete catalog. 

K & K COMPUTORWARE ■—— 

37326 Gregory Drive • Sterling Heights, Michigan 48077 wtmmm 

Telephone: (313) 264-7345 



Dungeon Adventure as the very best entry in the graphics 
division. 

Gregory Ricketts is 19 years old and a freshman at Ohio 
State University. His sights are set on a degree in electrical 
engineering, but right now he's working part-time as a 
bagger at Kroger. He's a member of the Columbus and 
Central Ohio Color Computer Club and has a 32K 
Extended Basic Color Computer and a Line Printer VIII. 
He's in the local euchre club and, at this writing, was 
participating in a Ping Pong tournament. 

Dungeon Adventure will be a chore to key in, and it takes 
a very long time to load and create a new dungeon. More in 
sympathy than as a "plug," we remind you that both winning 
programs are available on Rainbow On Tape. 

Greg says this is the "first big program" he's done, and our 
hats are off to him for a superiorjob. We liked the title page. 
We liked the march song. We even think the funeral dirge is 
a refreshing change from the more frequent "Taps, "at many 
games' end. We would like to have had more instructions, 
but we managed with those supplied. We would prefer a 
ROM pack, thank you, to the fretfully long loading time 
resulting from the ASCII format, but the Dungeon 
Adventure is worth waiting for. More details, including 
loading instructions, are provided with the program listing. 
Oh, yes, the objective is never really stated, but it's simple; 
stay alive and well as long as you can. 

In our non-graphics division, Gregory Clark is the 
entrant, but he adds that he had a lot of help from his 



children in creating Sir Randolf of the Moors, our first- 
place finisher. Clark lives in Syracuse and is a technician 
with the New York Telephone Company. He bought his 32K 
machine a year ago, and this is his first contest. He hooks up 
to the TV in the family room except when the kids are using 
the Atari, at which time he is relegated to the black-and- 
white set. "My 1 1-year old son, Kevin, helped with some of 
the scenarios and did the de-bugging," says Clark, "while my 
1 3-year old daughter, Terri, typed up the descriptions." Ten, 
single-spaced pages of documentation, mind you. 

The judges, one and all, have high praise for Sir Randolf, 
which takes place in a castle and has 10 levels of difficulty. 
The "word pictures" are well written and the adventure 
holds new twists at each level of difficulty. The format, 
which requires typing the verb on the first line and entering 
before adding the noun on a second line is a bit cumbersome, 
but overall the adventure has many great features and you 
learn soon enough to pace yourself to the two-line entry 
format. 

Congratulations to all three Clark family members for 
taking the top non-graphics honors. 

Now, you be the judge. Try them yourself and let us know 
what you think. In the February issue, we'll share some of 
our judges' general observations, specific criticisms and 
suggestions for improvements. 

Maybe they'll help you win a prize in the new Rainbow 
Simulation Contest! /^ 



COMPUKIDS MAGAZINE 



The Computer Magazine for Beginners 

Educational articles that are easy to understand 
Game programs 
Computer book reviews 
Program problems 



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24 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



TOM MIX SOFTWARE 



•FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER • 3424 College N.E., Grand Rapids, Ml 49505 (616)364-4791 

DONKEY 
KING 

©1982 

32K Machine Language 

$24.95 tape 

$27.95 disc 

ARCADE ACTION — How high can you climb? Four full graphic screens. Exciting sound - Realistic graphics. Never | 
before has the color computer seen a game like this. Early reviews say: Just like the arcade - Simply outstanding 



U€* 



PROTECTORS 



KATERPILLAR 



Exciting fast paced arcade 

game that looks and plays like 

the popular arcade game 

"DEFENDER", 

Wave after wave of enemy 

fighters drop bombs on your 

city. Destroy them before they 

destroy your city. Soon the 

mother ships appear firing laser blasts at you. Watch for the 

heat seeking mines. 

Your defense includes your laser cannon plus four smart 

bombs on each of your four ships. A new ship with each 5,000 

points. 

High resolution graphics with four colors make this new 32K 

arcade game the one for others to follow. 

MACHINE LANGUAGE $24.95 TAPE $27.95 DISK 



SOLO POOL 

Now play pool with your col- 
or computer. Two players. 
Plays like machine 
language. Super color. High 
resolution graphics. 
16K Extended Basic $17.95 




BIRD ATTACK 

A fast paced machine 
language arcade game. 
Shoot the birdmen before 
they descend upon you. 
Watch out for their bombs! 
16K Extended Basic $21.95 



OTHER GREAT GAMES 

ALL PROGRAMS REQUIRE 16K 
ML= MACHINE LANGUAGE B= BASIC 
MOON LANDER«Fantastic Graphics. Land on the Moon if you 
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DANCING DEVIL«Watch him dance to music or program him 
yourself. ML $14.95 

WAR KINGS«Battle to save your castle and king. High resolu- 
tion graphics with outstanding sound make this one a real win- 
ner. 16K MACHINE LANGUAGE $19.95 

ADVENTURES 

TREK-16-Travel thru space with Spock and Capt. Kirk. Adven- 
ture. Tough! B 19.95 
SHIPWRECK-Escape from a desert isle if you can. Great 
Adventure! B $14.95 



ATTACK 



WSFi 



Outstanding graphics and sound wil 
end all of those trips to the arcade. So 
much like the arcade you have to see it( 
to believe it. 

16K MACHINE LANGUAGE $24.95 
DISK $27.95 



\. 



COLOR GOLF 

Now sit at your computer and play I 
nine or eighteen holes. Outstanding 
graphics in the fairway or on the | 
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32K EXTENDED BASIC $16.95 



MAZE RACE 

Maze race is a one or two 
player game. Play either 
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against your favorite oppo- 
nent. 
16K MACHINE CODE $14.95 



^r 



nuT i r "":; iJ t 

U-'zHJ-L J 7iH Jl ri L^Kil 

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u I r.n!^ rzLrt'LiJ r Lxn iti i 




UTILITIES 

COLOR MONITOR-Written in position independent code. (May 
be located in any free memory). Very compact. Only occupies 
1174 bytes of memory. Full Featured. Includes Break-Pointing 
of machine language programs, register display and modify, 
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mands. Displays memory in hex and ascii format on one line 8 
bytes long. MACHINE LANGUAGE $24.95 

TAPE DUPE— Brand new machine language program that 
copies any tape effortlessly. Completely automatic. ML$16.95 
DISK TO TAPE-Dump the contents of any disk to tape 
automatically. ML$19.95 

TAPE TO DISK-Load the contents of any tape to disk 
automatically. ML $19.95 

MAIL LIST-Maintain a complete mailing list with phone 
numbers etc. B $19.95 

THE FIXER-Having trouble moving those 600 Hex progams to 
disk? The fixer will help. Completely automatic. ML $18.95 

TAPE CAT-AM new machine language program lists contents of 
tapes to printer. Make a catalog of your tapes. ML $17.95 

PROGRAM PRINTER UTILITY-This program will list basic pro- 
grams to your printer in two column format. Saves paper and 
makes your listing look professional, D\ sk based. B $19.95 



CHRISTMAS PACKAGE 

10 PLUS PROGRAMS FOR $20.00 



j All Basic Programs less than $2.00 each. A real j 
I bargain for the beginner Requires Extended Basic. 1 



•ADD $1.00 POSTAGE & HANDLING^TOP ROYALTIES PAID* 
MICHIGAN RESIDENTS ADD 4% SALES TAX • LOOKING FOR NEW SOFTWARE 




Adventure Contest-Non-Graphic Winner 

Sm 1 1 # 

ir i 

i>r 



By Gregory Clark 




In the year 974 AD was born a male child. The parents, 
being very poor even for peasants, indentured the child to 
their local lord. 

The boy grew up within the castle walls, never seeing the 
outside world except through the tales of the knights, 
overheard while he fought with the castle dogs for scraps of 
food under the banquet tables. 

Never having been given a proper name, he thought of 
himself as Sir Randolph of the Moors. All of his waking 
moments he envisioned himself as the victor of manyjousts, 
and even as the leader of a band of knights on a quest for the 
king. 

Being a rather husky young man, he was given the task of 
cleaning the lord's stables. Every chance he got, he learned 
to ride within the confines of the stable. This in itself showed 
a certain level of bravery, for if he was discovered even 
mounting a noble's steed he knew at the least it would mean 
a stout whipping. 

One fateful day, he happened upon a complete suit of 
armor belonging to a knight visiting the castle. What 
possessed him to don the armor, even he had no idea. Once 
suited, the logical step would be to set astride the knight's 
horse. 

As fate would have it, no sooner had he positioned himself 
on the horse than one of the castle dogs started barking. The 
high spirited animal immediately galloped out the open 
stable door and through the castle gates, carrying Sir 
Randolf with him. 

"Oh, what tricks the lord plays on me," lamented Sir 
Randolf, when he finally regained control of the horse. He 
found himself many miles from the castle, in completely 
unfamiliar surroundings, realizing that if he returned to the 
castle, an unknown, but definitely unpleasant fate awaited 
him. After long deliberation, he decided to continue on the 
road and let fate do what she willed. 

Hungry and weary, after several days of riding, he came 
upon a small village situated at the base of a towering 
mountain. Here, his physical needs overcame his natural 
fear of the unknown. He boldly rode into the town, and 
when he had reached the inn, he realized that a not-small 
group of townspeople had already formed around him. 
More came from every direction. 

Helping hands assisted him from his mount and fairly 
carried him to the inn. He was taken to a table, and even 



S3: 





*■»* 




RAINBOW 




A- -\_ 








' "X 




32K 




ECB 


s& 


* 




^6B89 End 


' 5AF8 399 


480D 349 


3AC9 299 


3037 249 


2816 199 


1CC5 149 


12F6 99 


0692 49 



before he was seated a large tankard of ale and a sizeable 
chunk of venison were placed before him. 

Removing his helmet, hetried to explain his lack offunds. 
However, he was told that everything had been arranged 
and not to worry. Having failed in his protests, he began to 
devour the fare. 

A commotion at the entrance interrupted his meal. 
Looking up, he spied a rather rotund man approaching. 
Speaking very rapidly he greeted Sir Randolf and thanked 
him for arriving so quickly. Randolf may have been short on 
worldliness, but he was bright enough to continue eating 
and just listen. 

It seems the stranger was the equivalent to mayor of the 
village. Randolf soon pieced together an idea of what he had 
happened upon. 

Near the peak of the mountain was a castle of an evil lord, 
Blandor. He had demanded and recevied heavy taxes for so 
many years that the village was now near collapse. Anyone 
opposing him was disposed of by either his guards or by 
some magical means. Recently it had been rumored that he 
had fallen ill and had died and his guards fearing loss of his 
magical protection had fled. 

Three weeks ago, prior to this moment, the mayor had 
requested from a neighboring lord the services of a knight to 
explore the castle and prove the rumor true or false. The 
town's messenger, a not-too-bright lad, had forgotten most 
of the reply by the time he had returned. The only thing he 
was sure of was that the knight carried the sign of the 
unicorn on his shield. 

Randolf now realized his situation: the mount and armor 
he had acquired belonged to the knight promised to the 
town. The townspeople were counting on him to go to the 
castle and discover exactly what was going on. He decided to 
attempt the quest himself. 

After two days of rest, he mounted up and headed to the 
castle. After a few hours of travel, a dark-cloaked man 
appeared on the trail ahead of him. He introduced himself as 
Herman, former wizard to the evil Lord Blandor, who had 
discharged him after learning all he could of his craft. 

Herman had observed Randolf and had correctly 
deduced his plight. In an attempt to help, he presented 
Randolf with a pea-sized ruby. The gem had the ability to 
break minor magical spells, but most of its power was 
exhausted. Only five charges were left. Now, Randolf was 



26 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



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told to rub the stone if he felt magic was being used against 
him. 

Herman also mentions that there may be something left in 
his former workship, but not to count on it, as Blandor had 
removed or destroyed most of his supplies just before 
casting him out. The ruby is the last magical object he has 
left. 

Randolf now stands before the castle of Blandor. An 
ignorant, but not stupid stable boy, he is ready to attempt 
the work meant for a fully-trained knight. All he has with 
him is the sword, dagger, a small belt pouch from the 
knight's equipment, and the ruby from Herman. The armor 
he has left in town, finding it too confining. 

There you have the situation. Randolf is a healthy young 
man, strong of heart and spirit, but sadly lacking in any 
knowledge needed to complete his quest. 

It is up to you to guide Randolf along the way. He will 
show no initiative, including self-preservation. You will be 
in total control and must make your instructions very simple 
and, at the same time, precise. If Randolf knows an object by 
one name, for example, he will not react to another common 
name for the same object. 

He best follows instructions given in two parts. 

First, tell him what action you wish him to perform, and 
then specify to or with what. For example: The instruction 
"lift up the black pot" will only confuse him. However, just 
the word "lift" and then the word "pot" will get the desired 
results. 

Some one word commands will also be understood. 

"VIEW" will give a general description of the present 
location should Randolf forget where he is. 

"LIST' will get you all the objects Randolf is carrying — 
that he can see. 

Randolf will tell you which ways he can see to move. To 



get him to move, just give him the first letter of the direction. 
For example, to have him move north, just give him the 
letter 4 N' and he will go north. 

Just remember, Randolf will only do what you tell him — 
no more, no less. 





PROGRAM 




100 VARIABLES 






150 FIRST INPUT 




200 SECOND INPUT 




300 ACTION DETERMINATION 




1100 ACTION SECTIONS-I00 LINE BLOCKS 


5000 MOVEMENT TRAP + ASSIGNMENT 


5500 VARIABLE SUB-ROUTINES 




6000 LEVEL DESCRIPTIONS-1000 LINE BLOCKS 


15000 MOVEMENT RESTRICTIONS 




20000 DATA LINES 






BS-ACTIONS 




1 LOOK 


II CLIMB 


21 HIT 


2 SLAY 


12 GET 


22 DIG 


3 JUMP 


13 UNLOCK 


23 BURN 


4 LISTEN 


14 STAND 


24 OPEN 


5 SAY 


15 PULL 


25 PUT 


6 RUB 


16 PUSH 


26 SMELL 


7 TURN 


17 DROP 


27 THROW 


8 LIFT 


18 CARRY 


28 KICK 


9 CUT 


19 BRIBE 


29 DIVE 


10 STAB 


20 BREAK 


30 WIPE 



Experience the 

Magazine 

of the Future . 



The Programmer's Institute's magnetic magazines 
will entertain, educate, and challenge you. 

Each issue features ready-to-load programs ranging from 
games, adventures, home applications and utilities to personal 
finance, educational, and our unique teaching programs. Our 
magazines include fully listable programs, a newsletter con- 
taining descriptions and instructions for all programs, and notes 
on programming techniques used. 



JM 




for the TRS-80 COLOR Ext. Basic 



orders only, toll free number: 

1-800-334-SOFT 



| ORDERING INFORMATION - 


Subscriptions* Cassette 


Diskette 


Year (10 issues) $50.00 


$75.00 


Vi Year (5 issues) $30.00 


$45.00 


Trial Issue $10.00 


$15.00 


* Add $2.00 postage and handling. 
ALL SOFTWARE REQUIRES 16K. 



See your local dealer or order direct: 
THE PROGRAMMER'S INSTITUTE 

a division of FUTUREHOUSE 
P.O. BOX 3191, DEPT. R 
CHAPEL HILL, NC 27514 




X 



for information: 

1-919-967-0861 

Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 11-3 



28 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 






>==NON GRAPHICS ADVENTURE== 
'===FOR "THE RAINBOW "====== 

* =========CONTEST========== 

>=====BY GREGORY CLARK===== 

'=====122 MALE AVENUE====== 

' =SYRACUSE , NEW YORK ,1321 9== 
* ======3 15-487-8406======== 

>===WRiTTEN AUGUST 1982==== 

10 '=WITH MUCH HELP FROM KEVIN= 

11 '**PCLEAR 1 BEFORE LOADING** 

12 '*FOR 32K MEMORY-EXT BASIC** 

13 >=========================== 

14 PRINT: CLS:PRINT@228, "SIR RAND 
OLF OF THE MOORS" : FOR X=1TO200: PL 
AY"L200DDA":NEXT 

15 CLS: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: P 
RINT; " SKILL LEVEL 



16 PRINT: PRINT; ">»>SELECT DIGIT 
FROM TO 9<<<<" 

17 PRINT.-PRINT; "ZERO (0) = EASIE 
ST" 

18 PRINT; "NINE (9) = HARDEST" 

19 PRINT: PRINT: INPUT"ENTER CHOIC 
E";Q 

20 Q1=INT(Q) 

21 IF Ql>9 OR QK0 THEN CLS:PRIN 
T;" INPUT MUST BE AN INTEGER 



IN RANGE OF TO 9": SO 
UND100,3:GOTO15 

22 CLS: PRINT6232, "JUST A MOMENT" 

23 DIM A*<10),B*<30> ,C*<40> ,V(12 

) 

24 HV=3:w=5:LV=3:N=l:s=l:E=l:w= 
i:u=i:d=i:y=i:wa=i 

25 RB=l : FT=l : sw=l : DA=l : RU=5: DR=l 
:D3=l:D4=l:ST=l 

26 FORX=1TO10:READA*<X> :PLAY"L20 

0;d":nextx 

27 FORX=1TO30:READB*<X> :PLAY"L20 

0;c:next 

28 FORX=1TO40:READC*<X> :PLAY"L20 

0;f":nextx:cls 

29 GOTO304 

30 PRINT;" 7////////////////////.7.7////.7.7.7.7.7.7. 
7.7.7.7.7.7.7.7. " : PLAY " L 1 50 ; FP i 0F " : I NPUT 
"WHAT DO YOU WANT TO DO 

";D* 

31 IF DI=1 AND WA=1 AND HV=1 AND 
W=l THEN TJ=TIMER:IF TJ-1000 > 
TI THEN 281 

32 IFD*="VIEW"THEN304 

33 IFD*="HELP"THEN50 

34 IF Y=9 THEN WJ=WJ+1:IF WJ>15- 
(Ql+1) THEN324 

35 IFD*="N"THEN287 

36 IFD*="S"THEN287 

37 IFD*="E"THEN287 



You've invested a lot of time and money into your computer . . . 
It's time that investment paid off! 




THE COLOR ACCOUNTANT 



The Programmer's Institute introduces THE COLOR ACCOUNTANT, the only complete personal financial packa 
specifically designed for the TRS-80 COLOR computer. This unique package includes: 

1. Complete Checkbook Maintenance 5. Payments/ Appointments Calendar 8. Home Budget Analysis 

2. Chart of Accounts Maintenance 6. Color Graph Design Package 9. Decision Maker 

3. Income/Expense Statement (graphs any files) 10. Mailing List 

4. Net Worth Statement 7. Check Search 



After the initial setup, THE COLOR ACCOUNTANT requires less 
than an hour of data input each month. 

The checkbook maintenance program is the key to the entire package. 
Once your checkbook is balanced, the checkbook summary file will auto- 
matically update the home budget analysis, net worth, and income/ 
expense statements. You can then graph any file, record bills and appoint- 
ments, make decisions, print a mailing list, and analyze various accounts. 

All programs are menu-driven and allow add/change/delete. Files 
and statements can be listed to screen or printer, and saved to casette or 



The perfect supplement to THE COLOR ACCOUNTANT, The Tux Handler includes: 

1. Complete From 1040 3. Schedule G (Income Averaging) 

2. Schedule A (Itemized Deductions) 4. Schedule B 

This year let The Tmx Handler prepare your taxes ($34.95 cassette, $39.95 diskette). 



diskette. THE COLOR ACCOUNTANT also comes with 60 pages of 
documentation that leads you step-by-step through the entire package. 
The TRS-80 COLOR Ext. Basic requires 16K. 
($74.95 cassette, $79.95 diskette). 

Add $3 for postage and handling. 

See your local dealer or order direct: 
THE PROGRAMMERS INSTITUTE 

a division of FUTUREHOUSE 
P.O. BOX 3191, DEPT. R 
CHAPEL HILL, NC 27514 




1-800-334-SOFT 

MonFri 1 0-6; Sat II-3 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 29 



38 IFD*="W"THEN287 

39 IFD*="U"THEN287 

40 IFD*="D"THEN287 

41 IFD*="DIVE"THEN45 

42 IFD*="LIST"THEN52 

43 play"L150; g; P10; G" : input" " ; E* 

44 G*=LEFT*<E*,4> 

45 FORA=1TO30 

46 F*=LEFT*<D*,4> : IF F*=B*<A> TH 
EN49 

47 NEXTA 

48 PRINT; "I CANNOT " ; D*: PLAY"L20 
5 DP 1 0CP 1 0DP6 " : GOTO30 

49 ON A GOTO 67,104,107,109,111, 
113, 122, 125, 128, 136, 138, 141, 168, 
176, 180, 187, 190,219,221,226,232, 
240, 243, 249, 260, 268, 270, 275, 277, 
283 

50 'START HELP SECTION 
PRINT; "HELP" 
'LIST 

PRINT; "I AM CARRYING" 
IF SW=1 THENPRINT; "A 
IF DA=1 THENPRINT; "A 



51 

52 

53 

54 

55 

56 IF 

RUBY" 



SWORD" 
DAGGER" 
RB=1 THENPRINT; "THE MAGIC 




57 IF OC=l THENPRINT "THE OCTAGON 
OF GOLD" 

58 IF HE=1 THENPRINT "THE HEXAGON 
OF GLASS" 

59 IF NE=1 THENPRINT"THE PENTAGO 
N NECKLACE" 

60 IF LA=1 THENPRINT "THE LANCE" 

61 IF KE=1 THENPRINT "THE KEY OF 
GOLD 

62 IF RI=1 THENPRINT"THE INVISIB 
ILITY RING" 

63 IF SK=1 THENPRINT "THE SACK OF 
MARBLES" 

64 IF FT=1 THENPRINT "FLINT AND T 
INDER" 

65 GOTO30:'END OF LIST 

66 PRINT; "SORRY! ! -NO HELP FOR YO 
U NOW":GOTO30: 'END HELP SECTION 

67 'LOOK 

68 IF LV=1 AND W=l AND HV=1 AND 
WA=0 AND D1=0 AND SL=0 THEN 69 

ELSE 72 

69 IFG*=C*<9> THEN PRINT; "IT'S J 



UST A SLIPPERY, FOUL SMELL-ING,GR 
EENISH SLIME":GOTO30 

70 IFG*=C*<10> THEN PRINT; "THERE 
APPEARS TO BE AN OUTLINE OF WH 

AT MAY BE A DOOR UNDER THE SLIME 
" : GOTO30 

71 IFG*=C*<11> THENPRINT; "THERE' 
S TOO MUCH SLIME COVERING IT TO 
TELL MUCH":GOTO30 

72 IF LV=1 AND W=l AND HV=1 AND 
WA=0 AND D1=0 AND SL=1 THEN 73E 

LSE76 

73 IF G*=C*<11> THENPRINT; "IT'S 
A DOOR WITH A SMALL RING-":G0T03 


74 IFG*=C*<10> THENPRINT; "THE OU 
TLINE IS MORE DEFINATE" : GOTO30 

75 IFG*=C*<12> THENPRINT; "IT'S J 
UST A RING ABOUT 3 INCHES ACROSS 
" : GOTO30 

76 IFG*=C*<14> AND W=4 AND HV=1 
AND LV=4 THENPRINT "THE STAIRS T 

HAT ARE THERE ARE COVERED WITH 
DUST":GOTO30 

77 IF LV=2 AND HV=3 AND VV=3 THE 
N78ELSE84 

78 IFG*=C*<16> THENPRINT "I SEE N 
OTHING MORE THAN I HAVE ALREADY 

TOLD":GOTO30 

79 IFG*=C*<17> THENPRINT "THEY AR 
E COVERED WITH MANY LINESAND SHA 
PES. ":GOTO30 

80 IFG*=C*<18> AND DW=0 THENPRIN 
T"JUST DRAWERS-THEY ARE CLOSED": 
GOTO30 

81 IFG*=C*<18> THENPRINT"IT CONT 
AINS A RING- ":GOTO30 

82 IFG*=C*<6> AND DW=1 THENPRINT 
"FROM WHAT THE PICTURES ENGRAVED 

ON IT SHOW, I THINK THE WEARER O 
FIT IS NOT ABLE TO BE SEEN, BUT 

IT ALSO COULD MEAN THAT IF IT I 
SPUT ON, THE WEARER IS KILLED- ON 
ETHING FOR SURE- IT ONLY WORKS ON 
ETIME":GOTO30 

83 IFG*=C*<19> OR G*=C* (20) THEN 
PR I NT "ALL I CAN SAY IS THERE ARE 

MANY OF THEM AND I WOULD HAVE N 
O WAY OF FIGURING OUT WHAT MAY B 
E IN ANY SINGLE ONE OF THEM.":G 
OTO30 

84 IF LV=4 AND VV=3 AND HV=3 THE 
N85 ELSE87 

85 IFG*=C*<23> AND ST=1 THENPRIN 
T"JUST A STATUE MADE OF QUARTZ": 
GOTO30 

86 IF G*=C*<23> THENPRINT; " I SEE 
A KEY-IT MUST HAVE BEEN UNDER 
THE STATUE " : GOTO30 

87 IF G*=C*<24> AND ST=0 THENPRI 



30 the RAINBOW January, 1983 



the Color Computer Word Processor 



3 display formats: 51/64/85 

columns X 24 lines 

True lower case characters 

User- friendly full -screen 

editor 

Right justification 

Easy hyphenation 

Drives any printer 

Embedded format and 

control codes 

Runs in 16K, 32K, or 64K 

Menu-driven disk and 

cassette I/O 

No hardware modifications 

required 



THE ORIGINAL 



Simply stated, Telewriter is the most powerful 
word processor you can buy for the TRS-80 
Color Computer. The original Telewriter has 
received rave reviews in every major Color 
Computer and TRS-80 magazine, as well as 
enthusiastic praise from thousands of satisfied 
owners. And rightly so. 
The standard Color Computer display of 32 
characters by 16 lines without lower case is 
simply inadequate for serious word processing. 
The checkerboard letters and tiny lines give you 
no feel for how your writing looks or reads. 
Telewriter gives the Color Computer a 51 
column by 24 line screen display with true 
lower case characters. So a Telewriter screen 
looks like a printed page, with a good chunk of 
text on screen at one time. In fact, more on 
screen text than you'd get with Apple II, Atari, 
TI, Vic or TRS-80 Model III. 

On top of that, the sophisticated Telewriter 
full-screen editor is so simple to use, it makes 
writing fun. With single-letter mnemonic 
commands, and menu-driven I/O and 
formatting, Telewriter surpasses all others for 
user friendliness and pure power. 
Telewriter's chain printing feature means that 
the size of your text is never limited by the 
amount of memory you have, and Telewriter's 
advanced cassette handler gives you a powerful 
word processor without the major additional 
cost of a disk. 



...one of the best programs for the Color 
Computer I have seen... 

— Color Computer News, Jan. 1982 



TELEWRITER-64 



But now we've added more power to 
Telewriter. Not just bells and whistles, but 
major features that give you total control over 
your writing. We call this new supercharged 
version Telewriter-64. For two reasons. 



64K COMPATIBLE 



Telewriter-64 runs fully in any Color Computer 
— 16K, 32K, or 64K, with or without Extended 
Basic, with disk or cassette or both. It 
automatically configures itself to take optimum 
advantage of all available memory. That means 
that when you upgrade your memory, the 
Telewriter-64 text buffer grows accordingly. In 
a 64K cassette based system, for example, you 
get about 40K of memory to store text. So you 
don't need disk or FLEX to put all your 64K 
to work immediately. 



64 COLUMNS (AND 85!) 



Besides the original 51 column screen, 
Telewriter-64 now gives you 2 additional high- 
density displays: 64 x 24 and 85 x 24!! Both 
high density modes provide all the standard 
Telewriter editing capabilities, and you can 
switch instantly to any of the 3 formats with a 
single control key command. 
The 51 X 24 display is clear and crisp on the 
screen. The two high density modes are more 
crowded and less easily readable, but they are 
perfect for showing you the exact layout of 
your printed page, all on the screen at one 
time. Compare this with cumbersome 
"windows" that show you only fragments at a 
time and don't even allow editing. 



RIGHT JUSTIFICATION & 
HYPHENATION 



One outstanding advantage of the full-width 
screen display is that you can now set the 
screen width to match the width of your 
printed page, so that "what you see is what 
you get." This makes exact alignment of 
columns possible and it makes hyphenation 
simple. 

Since short lines are the reason for the large 
spaces often found in standard right justified 
text, and since hyphenation is the most 
effective way to eliminate short lines, 
Telewriter-64 can now promise you some of the 
best looking right justification you can get on 
the Color Computer. 



FEATURES & SPECIFICATIONS: 



Printing and formatting. Drives any printer 
(LPVI1/VIII, DMP-100/200, Epson, Okidata, 
Centronics, NEC, C. Itoh, Smith-Corona, 
Terminet, etc). 

Embedded control codes give full dynamic access to 
intelligent printer features like: underlining, 
subscript, superscript, variable font and type size, dot- 
graphics, etc. 

Dynamic (embedded) format controls for: top, 
bottom, and left margins; line length, lines per page, 
line spacing, new page, change page numbering, 
conditional new page, enable/disable justification. 
Menu-driven control of these parameters, as well as: 
pause at page bottom, page numbering, baud rate (so 
you can run your printer at top speed), and Epson 
font. "Typewriter" feature sends typed lines directly 
to your printer, and Direct mode sends control codes 
right from the keyboard. Special Epson driver 
simplifies use with MX-80. 

Supports single and multi-line headers and automatic 
centering. Print or save all or any section of the text 
buffer. Chain print any number of files from cassette 
or disk. 



File and I/O Features: ASCII format files — 
create and edit BASIC, Assembly, Pascal, and C 
programs, Smart Terminal files (for uploading or 
downloading), even text files from other word 
processors. Compatible with spelling checkers (like 
Spell 'n Fix). 

Cassette verify command for sure saves. Cassette auto- 
retry means you type a load command only once no 
matter where you are in the tape. 
Read in, save, partial save, and append files with disk 
and/or cassette. For disk: print directory with free 
space to screen or printer, kill and rename files, set 
default drive. Easily customized to the number of 
drives in the system. 

Editing features: Fast, full-screen editor with 
wordwrap, block copy, block move, block delete, line 
delete, global search and replace (or delete), wild card 
search, fast auto-repeat cursor, fast scrolling, cursor 
up, down, right, left, begin line, end line, top of text, 
bottom of text; page forward, page backward, align 
text, tabs, choice of buff or green background, 
complete error protection, line counter, word counter, 
space left, current file name, default drive in effect, 
set line length on screen. 

Insert or delete text anywhere on the screen without 
changing "modes." This fast "free-form" editor 
provides maximum ease of use. Everything you do 
appears immediately on the screen in front of you. 
Commands require only a single key or a single key 
plus CLEAR. 



...truly a state of the art word processor., 
outstanding in every respect. 

— The RAINBOW, Jan. 1982 



PROFESSIONAL 
WORD PROCESSING 



You can no longer afford to be without the 
power and efficiency word processing brings to 
everything you write. The TRS-80 Color 
Computer is the lowest priced micro with the 
capability for serious word processing. And 
only Telewriter-64 fully unleashes that 
capability. 

Telewriter-64 costs $49.95 on cassette, $59.95 
on disk, and comes complete with over 70 
pages of well-written documentation. (The step- 
by-step tutorial will have your writing with 
Telewriter-64 in a matter of minutes.) 
To order, send check or money order to: 

Cognitec 
704 Nob Street 
Del Mar, CA 92014 

Or check your local software store. If you have 
questions, or would like to order by Visa or 
Mastercard, call us at (619) 755-1258 
(weekdays, 8AM-4PM PST). Dealer inquiries 
invited. 

(Add $2 for shipping. Calif ornians add 6°7o state tax. Allow 2 
weeks for personal checks. Send self-addressed stamped 
envelope for Telewriter reviews from CCN, RAINBOW, 
80-Micro, 80-U.S. Telewriter owners: send SASE or call for 
information on upgrading to Telewriter-64. Telewriter- 
compatible spelling checker (Spell 'n Fix) and Smart Terminal 
program (Colorcom/E) also available. Call or write for more 
information.) 

Apple II is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.; Atari is a 
trademark of Atari, Inc.; TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy 
Corp; MX-80 is a trademark of Epson America, Inc. 



NT "IT IS MADE OF GOLD. THE HANDLE 
ISSHAPED AS A CLOVER LEAF AND T 
HE OTHER END IS FORMED INTO THE 
SHAPE OF A CROSS. " : GOTO30 

88 IFG$=C$<26> AND LV=4 AND W=3 
AND HV=5 THEN PR I NT "ONE PLANK S 

EEMS TO BE LOOSE" : GOTO30 

89 IF LV=5 AND HV=3 AND W=l AND 
G$=C$<31> THENPRINT"THERE ARE T 

HREE HOLES IN THE BLOCK.": GOT 
030 

90 IF G$=C$<32> AND LV=3 AND W= 
4 AND HV=2 THEN91ELSE94 

91 IF CH=0 THENPRI NT "IT'S JUST A 
SMALL CHEST. " : GOTO30 

92 IF CH=1 AND HE=0 THENPRINT"TH 
ERE IS A HEXAGON OF GLASS IN TH 
E CHEST. ":GOTO30 

93 IF CH=1 AND HE=1 THENPRINT"TH 
E CHEST IS EMPTY " : GOTO30 

94 IF G$=C$<35> AND LA=1 THENPRI 
NT" IT IS MADE OF A WOODEN SHAFT 

ABOUT TWO ARM-SPANS LONG WITH 
A SHARP METAL POINT. " : GOTO30 

95 IF G$=C$<36> AND LV=5 AND W= 
1 AND HV=3 THENPRI NT "THERE ARE T 



HREE HOLES-HEXAGON, OCTAGON AND 
PENTAGON IN SHAPE. ": GOTO30 

96 IF LV=5 AND HV=3 AND W=2 AND 
G$=C$<37> THENPRI NT "THE BODY OF 
BLANDOR LIES UPON THE ALTAR. Y 

OUR QUEST IS FINISHED": PRINT: PRI 
NT "CONGRATULATIONS! ! ":FORX=1TO50 
00: NEXT: CLS: END 

97 IF G$=C$<25> AND LV=4 AND HV= 

4 AND W=3 THEN PRINT" IT IS SOLI 
D METAL-THE SURFACE ISFEATURELES 

5 EXCEPT FOR A SMALL CROSS-SHAP 
ED HOLE IN THE CENTER. ": GOTO30 

98 IF Y=6 AND G$=C$<38> THENPRIN 
T"THEY ARE ALL SHARP-EXCEPT ONE- 

THAT PARTICULAR SPIKE IS BLUNT 
. " : GOTO30 

99 IF G$=C$<40> AND SK=1 THENPRI 
NT" JUST A WORN, BROWN LEATHER SAC 
K WITH A DRAW-STRING TIE.": GOTO 
30 

100 IF LV=3 AND E$="MOAT" THENPR 
INT"THE CROCODILES LOOK VERY HUN 
GRY. ":GOTO30 

101 IF Y=3 AND G$=C$<7> THENPRIN 
T"I DON'T REALLY WANT T0-":G0T03 





From GREAT X-P-T 

for TRS 80 Color Computer 



Color Sound 
High Res. Graphics 
Req. 16k Ext Basic 
$1095ea. 





FOR THE 
GAMBLER 
16k Ext Basic 
High Res. Graphics 

Play Alone 
or Against 
Your Friends 

$10.95ea. 



ietc!i!i 

■Jlnil ■ 

BRTTLE 



_ GREAT X-P-T 

H^b K). Box 921 2 

SS5ST Livonia, Mi. 48150 

HOLIDAY SALE! 



tMich, Res. add 4V. 
COD oddSlQO 



Sales lax 




16k 
Cotor 
Sound 
Graphics 

$10.95ea. 



FREE CATALOG AVAILABLE 



.ALL THREE FOR* 



25.95 



32 the RAINBOW January. 1983 



MACROTRON® Presents The 

PROFESSIONAL KEYBOARD 

For the TRS-80® Color Computer 



^W|, ^^k, j^W; j^^^ jPPPI f^*- :J^^ W^* .^^ ,^7* 

^■1 .^^ ^^^. ^^ ,:^^. ,^W* J^W /^^. J^^| J^l 

^W jfl!PJj ^Pl .^^ .^^ ^^R ^^ ^^^ #^ J^^ : .IPS 



INTRODUCTORY SPECIAL 

$79.95 



'^'■'■"""■V" 



FEATURES 

Professional Quality, Full Travel 
Simple Plug-In Installation 
Four User Defined Function Keys 
Complete Documentation Included 




sasssaa 



ml 



Present version not compatible with Revision F Color and TDP-100 Computers 



Available From 



MICRONIX SYSTEMS 

#7 Gibralter Square 

Saint Charles, Missouri 63301 

(314) 441-0341 

All Orders Shipped From Stock 
COD Orders add $3.50 shipping Check, Money Order add $2 

Dealer Inquiries Invited 



102 IF E$=" GOBLINS" THENPRINT"EA 
CH ONE HAS A SWORD IN ONE HAND AN 
D THE OTHER HAND IS EXTENDED OU 
T-PALM UP. M :GOTO30 

103 PRINT; "I DON'T SEE ANYTHING 
SPECIAL" :GOTO30 

104 'SLAY 

105 IF E*=" DRAGON" THENPRINT"YOU 
MUST BE KIDDING!": GOTO30 

106 PRINT" I CAN'T":GOTO30 

107 'JUMP 

108 PRINT; "I CAN'T JUMP OVER THA 
T ! " : GOTO30 

109 'LISTEN 

110 PRINT; "I DON'T HEAR ANYTHING 
OUT OF THEORDINARY":GOTO30 

111 'SAY 

112 print; "i said ' ";e$; " '" :prin 
t; m but nothing happened" :goto30 

113 'RUB 

114 IF RU<1 THEN PRINT;" IT IS PO 
WERLESS-YOU HAVE USED ALL FIVE 

CHARGES ":GOTO30 

115 IF LV=1 AND Y=3 THEN116ELSE1 
18 

116 IF G*=C$<5> THEN PRINT; "THE 
RUBY IS CHANGING COLORS AND GIVI 
NG OFF A HUMMING SOUND. THE SCOR 
PIANS ARE CHANGING COLORS ALON 
G WITH THE GEM. " 

117 PRINT; "SUDDENLY AS THEY CAME 
THEY HAVE TURNED INTO HARMLESS 

ANTS AND SCURRIED OFF INTO THE 
CRACKS IN THE WALLS. ": Y=l : B3=l : 
RU=RU-l:GOTO304 

118 IF Y=4 AND G*=C*<5> THENPRIN 
T"THE RUBY IS HUMMING AND CHANG I 

ngcolors- m :forx=itoi000:next:pri 

NT "THE FLAMES HAVE GONE ! " : Y=l : B4 
= 1 : RU=RU-1 : GOTO304 

119 IFY=7 AND G*=C*<5> THENPRINT 
"THE RUBY IS GIVING OFF A HUMING 

SOUND-" : FORX=1TO1000: NEXT: PRINT 
"THERE, I CAN MOVE AGAIN. ": Y=l : B7 
=1 : RU=RU-1 : GOTO304 

120 IF G$=C$<5> THEN RU=RU-1 

121 PRINT;"! TRIED - BUT I'M AFR 



! /\ n v t T r, f> v v 

t ££^ h - ~ -u <- L- L-. 1 JL-j> t f 

J Jaien tnlloor.s .falling £rc:r^' 

j the air but don't catch m&lal. 

j 1 6K & Jcy. rcq.-cofne? on C:iC3. 

I S2NL 38.95 check -r xoriej or- 



rter to TRIJO CC3J Crest way Ir. 

45309 * 



" tV ville, 0h.it 



F3. TO yon 
narked l.v J 



-p~ 



L. 3. 2 i • 

receive ^ 
a - lion ! 



•'" .0C 



4 0X1 vn; 
-> - - J * J u • 

refund. 
sou:vJ 



AID NOTHINGWAS ACCOMPLISHED BY I 
T":GOTO30 

122 'TURN 

123 IF G*=C$<30> AND MI=0 AND LV 
=3 AND W=3 AND HV=4 THENPRINT "I 
T'S TURNING-": PR I NT "THE WALL NEX 
T TO THE MIRROR IS OPENING. ": T= 
0:O=5:GOTO447 

1 24 PR I NT 5 " NOTH I NG HAPPENED " : GOT 
030 

125 'LIFT 

126 IF G$=C*<27> AND LV=4 AND W 
=3 AND HV=5 AND OC=0 THENPRINT"T 
HERE IS AN OCTAGON SHAPED PIECEO 
F GOLD UNDER THE PLANK. ": GOTO30 

1 27 PR I NT ; " CAN ' T " : GOTO30 

128 'CUT 

129 PLAY "L200;DDA": INPUT "WITH WH 
AT";H$ 

130 IF H*=" SWORD" OR H*=" DAGGER" 
THEN 131 ELSE PRINT; "NOTHING HA 

PPENED":GOTO30 

131 IF LV=1 AND Y=2 AND G*=C* ( 1 ) 
THEN 133ELSE 132 

132 IF LV=1 AND Y=2 AND G*=C* (2) 
THEN 133ELSE 134 

133 PRINT; "IT'S NOT WORKING-THE 

";h$:print; "is now caught in the 
web":goto30 

134 ' 

135 PR I NT "NOTHING HAPPENED" : GOTO 
30 

136 'STAB 

137 PRINT; "I STABBED THE ";E$:PR 
INT;" BUT NOTH I NG HAPPENED " : G0T03 


138 'CLIMB 

139 IF Y=5 AND G*=C*<39> THENPRI 
NT "THE BARS MUST STAY IN PLACE A 
S LONG AS THERE IS WEIGHT UPON 
THEFLOOR! THE BARS HAVE GONE BAC 
K. " : B5=l : Y=l : GOTO304 

140 PRINT;" I CAN'T CLIMB IT": GOT 
030 

141 'GET 

142 IF W=l AND HV=1 AND LV=1 AN 
D WA=1 THEN PRINT;"! CAN'T": GOTO 



GAMES FOR THINKERS 

MINEFIELD (^K) - Follow the clues of your 

mine detector to find your way safely through 
the minefield. 10 levels of play. Tough! 

Gil - $4.95 

WALL STREET (16K) - Buy and sell stocks to 
make your fortune! 1-4 players. Stock & 
market, history charts. Many extras! Good 
family fun! G12 - $9.85 

We pay shipping. Wa . residents add 6.42 sales tax. /^^ 
No C.O.D. Personal check orders ship in 2 weeks. SK2J 

Ualfcalla £ni i?rpr t 020 suLrTwa^o 



34 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 




S 





3 

en 




e\ 







r» 



Sta 



30 

143 W1=VV*HV*LV 

144 IF G$=C$<3> AND V1=W1 AND SW 
=3 THEN PRINT; "I'VE GOT IT":SW=1 
: GOTO30 

145 IF G*=C*<4> AND V2=W1 AND DA 
=3 THEN PRINT;" I'VE GOT IT":DA=1 
: GOTO30 

146 IF G*=C*<5> AND V3=W1 AND RB 
=3 THEN PRINT; "I'VE GOT IT":RB=1 
: GOTO30 

147 IF G$=C$<12> AND V4=W1 AND F 
T=3 THEN PRINT; "I'VE GOT IT":FT= 
1IGOTO30 

148 IF G*=C*<6> AND V5=W1 AND RI 
=3 THEN PRINT; "I'VE GOT IT":RI=1 
: GOTO30 

149 IF G$=C$<13> AND V6=W1 AND N 
E=3 THEN PRINT; "I'VE GOT IT":NE= 
1IGOTO30 

150 IF G*=C$<40> AND V7=W1 AND S 
K=3 THENPR I NT" I'VE GOT IT":SK=1: 
GOTO30 

151 IF G*=C*<35> AND V8=W1 AND L 
A=3 THENPRINT"I'VE GOT IT":LA=1: 
GOTO30 

152 IF G*=C*<33> AND V9=W1 AND H 
E=3 THENPRINT"I'VE GOT IT":HE=1: 
GOTO30 

153 IF G*=C*<21> AND V10=W1 AND 
NE=3 THENPRINT"I'VE GOT IT":NE=1 
: GOTO30 

154 IF G*=C*<24> AND V11=W1 AND 
KE=3 THENPRINT"I'VE GOT IT":KE=1 
: GOTO30 

155 IF G*=C$<28> AND V12=W1 AND 
0C=3 THENPRINT"I'VE GOT IT":OC=l 
: GOTO30 

156 IFG*=C*<15> AND VV=4 AND HV= 
1 AND LV=4 THENPRINT"I'VE GOT A 
HANDFULL OF DUST" : DU=1 : GOTO30 

157 IF G*=C$<24> AND KE=0 AND LV 
=4 AND VV=3 AND HV=3 AND ST=0 TH 
ENPRINT"I'VE GOT THE KEY.":KE=1: 
GOTO30 

158 IF G$=C$<22> AND ST=1 AND LV 
=4 AND VV=3 AND HV=3 THENPRINT"0 
W! SOMETHING PRICKED ME-":FORX=l 
TO1500: NEXT: CLS (0) : FORX=1TO500: N 
EXTICLSIEND 

159 IF G$=C$<28> AND OC=l THENPR 
INT" I'VE ALREADY GOT IT.":GOTO30 

160 IF G*=C$<28> AND LV=4 AND VV 
=3 AND HV=5 THENPR I NT" I'VE GOT T 
HE OCTAGON. " : OC=l : GOTO30 

161 IFG$=C*<6> AND LV=2 AND VV=3 
AND HV=3 AND DW=1 THENPRINT"I P 

UT THE RING ON MY FINGER. I GUE 
SS THAT MEANS I'M INVISIBLE- BUT 
FOR HOW LONG?":RI=l:GOTO30 



162 IF G*=C$<35> AND LV=3 AND VV 
=3 AND HV=2 AND LA=0 THENPR I NT "I 
'VE GOT THE LANCE" : LA=1 IGOTO30 

163 IF G*=C$<33> AND HE=0 AND CH 
=1 AND LV=3 AND HV=2 AND VV=4 TH 
ENPRINT"I'VE GOT THE HEXAGON OF 
GLASS. " : HE=1 : GOTO30 

164 IF LV=2 AND VV=5 AND HV=5 AN 
D G$=C$<40> THEN 165ELSE167 

165 IF SK=1 THENPR I NT" I'VE ALREA 
DY GOT IT":GOTO30 

166 IF SK=0 THENPR I NT" I'VE GOT T 
HE SACK":SK=l:GOTO30 

167 PRINT; "I CAN'T GET THE ";E$: 
GOTO30 

168 'UNLOCK 

169 PRINT; "UNLOCK THE ";E*:LINEI 
NPUT"WITH WHAT? " ; M$ 

170 IF G$=C$<25> AND LV=4 AND HV 
=4 AND VV=3 THEN171ELSE174 

171 IF D3=0 THENPR I NT "IT'S ALREA 
DY OPEN. "IGOTO30 

172 IF M$="KEY" AND KE=0 THENPRI 
NT" I DON'T HAVE THE KEY.":GOTO30 

173 IF M$="KEY" AND KE=1 THENPRI 
NT" IT WORKED! THE DOOR SWUNG OPE 
N . " : D3=0 : T=0 : 0= 1 : G0T0447 

174 ' 

175 PRINT; "THE ";E*;" WON'T UNLO 
CK": PRINT; "WITH THE ";M$:GOTO30 

176 'STAND 

177 IF G$=C*<21> AND LV=2 AND VV 
=5 AND HV=2 AND NE=1 THENPRINT"E 
VERYTHING IS FUZZY-" : FORX=1TO150 
0: NEXTX : LV=4: HV=1 : VV=2: GOTO304 

178 IF G$=C$<21> AND LV=4 AND HV 
=1 AND VV=2 AND NE=1 THENPRINT"E 
VERYTHING IS FUZZY-" : FORX=1TO150 
0: NEXT: LV=2: HV=2: VV=5: GOTO304 

179 PRINT" I CAN'T":GOTO30 

180 'PULL 

181 IF DI=1 AND G$=C$<8> THEN PR 
INT; "IT CAME LOOSE FROM THE BOTT 
OM. THE WATER IS NOW SWIRLING A 
ROUND AND AROUND! IT'S ALL GOING 
OUT OF A SORT OF DRAIN IN THE F 
LOOR. THERE! IT'S ALL GONE-I'M ON 

THE FLOOR OF THE PIT." 

182 IF DI=1 AND G*=C*<8> THEN PR 
INT; "I SEEM TO BE STANDING ON A 
PILE OF RUBBLE. IT'S TOO DARK TO 

TELLWHAT IT IS, BUT FROM THE SME 
LL I DON'T CARE TO KNOW" : DI=0: WA 
=0: T=0: 0=0: G0T0447 

183 IF VV=1 AND HV=1 AND LV=1 AN 
D WA=0 THEN 184ELSE 185 

184 IF D1=0 AND G*=C*<6> THEN PR 
INT; "IT'S VERY HEAVY AND THE HIN 
GES ARE RUSTED, BUT I WAS ABLE T 
GET IT OPEN ENOUGH TO GET OUT." 



38 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



: D 1 = 1 : T=0 : 0=2 : G0T0447 

185 p 

186 PRINT; "I CAN'T PULL IT": GOTO 
30 

187 'PUSH 

188 IF Y=6 AND G$=C$<38> THENPRI 
NT "THE WALL IS MOVING BACK! AND 
THEDOORWAYS HAVE RE- APPEARED- ": B 

6=i:y=i:goto304 

189 PRINT;" I CAN'T PUSH IT": GOTO 
30 

190 'DROP 

191 IF G$=C$<5> THENPRINT"I WON' 
T DROP THE RUBY-HERMAN TOLD M 
E I MAY NEED IT.":GOTO30 

192 IF G$=C$<3> AND SW=1 THEN SW 
=2:GOTO205 

193 IF G$=C*<4> AND DA=1 THEN DA 
=2:GOTO205 

194 IF G$=C$<5> AND RB=1 THEN RB 
=2:GOTO205 

195 IF G$=C$<6> AND RI=1 THEN RI 
=2:GOTO205 

196 IF G$=C$<12> AND FT=1 THEN F 
T=2:GOTO205 

197 IF G*=C$<13> AND NE=1 THEN N 
E=2:GOTO205 

198 IF G$=C$<40> AND SK=1 THEN S 
K=2:GOTO205 

199 IF G$=C*<35> AND LA=1 THEN L 
A=2:GOTO205 

200 IF G*=C$<33> AND HE=1 THEN H 
E=2:GOTO205 

201 IF G*=C*<21> AND NE=1 THEN N 
E=2:GOTO205 

202 IF G$=C$<24> AND KE=1 THEN K 
E=2:GOTO205 

203 IF G$=C$<28> AND 0C=1 THEN O 
C=2:GOTO205 

204 PRINT; "I DON'T HAVE IT": GOTO 
30 

205 PRINT; "I DROPPED IT- I HOPE Y 
OU REMEMBER WHERE IT IS I DROPPED 

IT. THE FLOORS ARE IN SHA 
DOW AND I MAY NOT BE ABLE TO SE 
E IT IF I COME BACK LOOKING FOR 

IT." 

206 IF SW=2 THEN V1=VV*HV*LV: SW= 
3:GOTO30 

207 IF DA=2 THEN V2=VV*HV*LV: DA= 
3:GOTO30 

208 IF RB=2 THEN V3=VV*HV*LV: RB= 
3:GOTO30 

209 IF FT=2 THEN V4=VV*HV*LV: FT= 
3: GOTO30 

210 IF RI=2 THEN V5=VV*HV*LV: RI= 
3:GOTO30 

211 IF NE=2 THEN V6=VV*HV*LV: NE= 
3:GOTO30 

212 IF SK=2 THEN V7=VV*HV*LV: SK= 



3:GOTO30 

213 IF LA=2 THEN V8=VV*HV*LV: LA= 
3:GOTO30 

214 IF HE=2 THEN V9=VV*HV*LV: HE= 
3:GOTO30 

215 IF NE=2 THEN V10=VV*HV*LV: NE 
=3:GOTO30 

216 IF KE=2 THEN VI 1=VV*HV*LV: KE 
=3:GOTO30 

217 IF 0C=2 THEN V12=VV*HV*LV: OC 
=3:GOTO30 

218 PRINT; "I HAVEN'T GOT IT": GOT 
030 

219 'CARRY 

220 PR I NT;" I CAN'T CARRY THAT":G 
OTO30 

221 'BRIBE 

222 RR$="" 

223 IF LV=5 AND Y=9 AND SK=1 AND 
LEFT* <E$, 5 >= "GUARD" THEN INPUT" 

WITH WHAT";RR$:IF RR$=" MARBLES" 
THENPRI NT "THAT SATISFIED THEM.TH 
EY WENT BACK DOWN THE HALL ARG 
UING OVER WHICH ONE WOULD GET TH 
E BLUE TIGER-EYE. ":Y=l:B9=l:G 
OTO304 

224 IFRR$=""THEN INPUT "WITH WHAT 
" ; RR$ 

225 PR I NT "I GUESS THEY DON'T WAN 
T THAT ! " : GOTO30 

226 'BREAK 

227 IF LV=1 AND Y=2 THEN 228ELSE 
230 

228 IF G$=C$<1> OR G$=C$<2> THEN 
229ELSE230 

229 PRINT; "IT'S MUCH TOO STRONG 
TO BREAK ":GOTO30 

230 ' 

231 print; "i tried to break the 
";e$: print "but nothing happened. 

" : GOTO30 

232 'HIT 

233 PRINT; "HIT THE " ; E$: LINEINPU 
T"WITH WHAT? ";J$ 

234 IF G$=C*<22> AND HV=3 AND VV 
=3 AND LV=4 THEN 235ELSE238 

235 IF J*="DAGGER" OR J*="SWORD" 
THEN 236 ELSE 238 

236 IF ST=1 THENPRI NT "THE STATUE 
SMASHED INTO MANY PIECES, A M 

ECHANISM WITH A NEEDLE ATT ACHED F 
ELL TO THE FLOOR- ": ST=0: GOTO30 

237 PR I NT "THE STATUE IS ALREADY 
SMASHED. ":GOTO30 

238 ' 

239 PRINT; "I HIT THE ";E$: PRINT; 
"WITH THE ";J$:PRINT; "BUT IT DID 
N'T DO ANYTHING":GOTO30 

240 'DIG 

241 PRINT"DIG THE " ; E$: LINEINPUT 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 39 



"WITH WHAT? ";K* 

242 PRINT;" I TRIED TO DIG THE "5 

e$:print;"with the " ;k$:print; "b 

UT I WAS UNABLE TO DO IT":GOTO30 

243 'BURN 

244 PLAY " L200 ; DDA " : I NPUT " W I TH WH 
AT"; I* 

245 IFI$="FLINT AND TINDER" THEN 
246ELSE248 

246 IF LV=1 AND Y=2 THEN247ELSE2 
48 

247 IF G$=C$<1> OR G$=C$<2> THEN 
PRINT;" IT ALL BURNED UP IN A F 

LASH ! " : B2=l : Y=l : GOTO304 

248 PRINT"USING THE ";L$: PRINT;" 
THE ";E*;" WOty'T BURN":GOTO30 

249 'OPEN 

250 IF G$=C$<18> AND LV=2 AND HV 
=3 AND W=3 THEN I NPUT "WHICH DRA 
WER? TOP OR BOTTOM ";DW*:IFD 
W*= " BOTTOM "THENPR I NT "THERE IS A 
YELLOW GAS COMING OUT FROM THE DR 
AWER- I CAN'T SEE OR HEAR ANYTHI 
NG ! " : FORX=1TO3000: NEXT: CLS (0) : FO 
RX=1TO500: NEXT: CLS: END 

251 IF DW$="TOP" THENPRINT; "IT'S 
OPEN " : DW= 1 : DW$= " " : GOTO30 

252 IF G$=C$<32> AND LV=3 AND HV 
=2 AND VV=4 THEN253ELSE258 

253 INPUT"WITH WHAT" ; ZX$: IFZX$=" 
LANCE " THEN254ELSE256 

254 IF LA=1 THENPRINT"JUST AS TH 
E TOP OF THE CHEST OPENED A L 
ARGE BLACK SPIDER CAME OUT AND DI 
SAPPEARED INTO THE CLUTTER IN 

THE REAR OF THE ROOM. ": CH=1 : GOT 
030 

255 PR I NT "I DON'T HAVE A LANCE": 
GOTO30 

256 IF ZX*="SWORD" OR ZX$="DAGGE 
R" OR ZX$="HAND" THENPR I NT "A BLA 
CK SPIDER JUMPED FROM THE CHEST 

AND BIT ME. IT'S HARD TO BREAT 
HE" : FORX = 1TO2000: NEXT: CLS (0) : FOR 
X=1TO500: NEXT: CLS: END 

257 PRINT" IT WON'T OPEN":GOTO30 

258 IF SK=1 AND G$=C*<40> THENPR 
INT" IT CONTAINS ONLY A FEW WORTH 
LESSMARBLES. " : GOTO30 

259 PRINT; "I CAN'T OPEN THE " ; E$ 
: GOTO30 

260 'PUT 

261 INPUT"WHERE";XX* 

262 IF XX$="HOLE" AND HE=1 AND O 
C=l AND NE=1 THEN 266ELSE263 

263 IF XX$="HOLE" AND D4=l AND L 
V=5 AND W=l AND HV=3 THEN264ELS 
E267 

264 IF NE=1 OR 0C=1 OR HE=1 THEN 
265ELSE267 



265 IF G*=C$<33> OR G*=C$<21> OR 
G*=C$<28> THENPRINT" IT FIT OK,tf 

UT NOTHING HAPPENED" : GOTO30 

266 IF G$=C$<33> OR G$=C$<21> OR 
G$=C$<28> THEN PR I NT "I PUT ALL 

THREE IN THE CORRECT PLACES AND 
A SECTION OF WALL SLID OPEN. 
" : T=0: 0=8: D4=0: G0T0447 

267 PR I NT "I CAN'T":GOTO30 

268 'SMELL 

269 PRINT; "I JUST SMELL A(N) ";E 
$:GOTO30 

270 'SPRINKLE 

271 PRINT; "SPRINKLE THE ";E$:LIN 
E I NPUT "ON WHAT? " ; 0$ 

272 IF TS=0 AND DU=1 AND VV=4 AN 
D HV=1 AND LV=4 AND G$=C$<15> AN 
D 0*="STAIRS" THEN PRINT"AS THE 
DUST HITS THE MISSING STAIRS 
IT SPARKLES-OUTLINING THEWHOLE S 
TAIRWAY.IN FACT NOW THE STAIRWA 
Y IS COMPLETELY VI SABLE. " : T=l : 0= 
l:TS=l:G0T0447 

273 IF 0*=" STAIRS" AND DU=0 THEN 
PR I NT "I DON'T HAVE ANY DUST.": GO 
TO30 

274 PRINT; "I SPRINKLED THE ";E$: 
PRINT; "ON THE "; 0$: PRINT; "NOTHIN 
G HAPPENED" : GOTO30 

275 'KICK 

276 PR I NT "OUCH! ! " : GOTO30 

277 'DIVE 

278 IF LVMTHEN282 

279 IF WA=1 AND VV=1 AND HV=1 TH 
EN PRINT; "THE COLD WATER IS ABOU 
T 15 FEET DEEP. AT THE BOTTOM IS 

A LOT OF STUFF, BUT IT IS TOO DA 
RK TO SEE WHAT IT IS. I ONLY REC 
OGNIZE A PIECE OF CHAIN. PLEASE 

HURRY- I CAN'T HOLD MY BREATH T 
00 L0NG!":DI=1 

280 IF WA=1 AND VV=1 AND HV=1 TH 
EN TI=TIMER:GOTO30 

281 IF WA=1 AND VV=1 AND HV=1 TH 
ENPRINT;"YOU TOOK TOO LONG- I COU 
LDN'T STAY DOWN ANY LONGER-I' 
M BACK ONTHE SURFACE. ": DI=0: GOTO 
30 

282 PR I NT ; " I CAN ' T " : GOTO30 

283 'WIPE 

284 IF VV=1 AND WA=0 AND HV=1 AN 
D D1=0 AND LV=1 AND G$=C$<9> THE 
NPRINT;"IT'S NOT EXACTLY FUN BUT 

I'VE GOT MOST OF IT 0FF":SL=1 
: GOTO30 

285 PRINT; "I CAN'T":GOTO30 

286 PRINT; "I MUST HAVE MIS-UNDER 
STOOD — PLEASE RE-ENTER COMMA 
ND":GOTO30: 'TRAP 

287 IFD$="N" AND N=l THEN VV=VV- 



40 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 




SOFT ©DTV 

LIMITED TIME OFFER ON TDP SYSTEM 100 !! 

• Buy the fantastic, NEW, easily upgraded TDP System 1 00 computer, with 
Extended Color BASIC and 1 6K RAM for $479 and receive up to a $79.00 
credit* on ANY additional software or hardware purchased from Soft City!! 

• The TDP System 100 comes complete with joysticks, all manuals, and a 
Super-Bustout game cartridge (we pay the shipping, too!). 

Don't be stuck with a 'package deal'thatyou aren't really interested in! Put 
together your own by choosing from the largest selection of Color Computer 
software and hardware available anywhere! 

• We are dealers for: 

COGNITEC, COMPULINK, COMPUTERWARE, CORNSOFT, El- 
GEN SYSTEMS, FRANK HOGG LABORATORY, MARK DATA 
PRODUCTS, PRICKLY PEAR SOFTWARE, SKYLINE SOFTWARE, 
SOFTCORE SOFTWARE, SPECTRAL ASSOCIATES, SPEECH 
SYSTEMS, SUGAR SOFTWARE, TDP ELECTRONICS, TOM MIX, 
U.S. ROBOTICS, AND MORE... 

• Please write for FREE CATALOG. 




ORDERING INFORMATION 



ALL ITEMS SHIPPED FROM STOCK 
MASTERCHARGE AND VISA WELCOME 



Phone orders may be placed at either: 
(312) 260-0929 (Voice Line) 

or 
(312) 260-0640 (Modem Line) 
Mail orders and requests for catalogs 
should be sent to: 

SOFT CITY 
442 Sunnyside 
Wheaton, IL 60187 

*The 79.00 credit must be used within 30 days of the time of purchase of the TDP System 100 This is a 
merchandise credit only, and may be applied towards the list price of any item in the SOFT CITY catalog. 



28S IFD*="S" AND S = l THEN VV=VV+ 
1 

289 IFVV>5THENVV=5:GOTO303 

290 IFVV<1THENVV=1 : GOTO303 

291 IF D*="N" AND N = OR D$="S" 
AND S=0 THEN303 

292 IFD$="E" AND E=l THEN HV=HV+ 
1 

293 IFD*="W" AND W=l THEN HV=HV- 
1 

294 IFHV<1THENHV=1:GOTO303 

295 IFHV>5THENHV=5:GOTO303 

296 IF D$="E" AND E=0 OR D*="W" 
AND W^0 THEN303 

297 IFD*="U" AND U=l THEN LV=LV+ 
1 

298 IFD$="D" AND D=l THEN LV=LV- 
1 

299 IFLV<1THENLV=1:GOTO303 

300 IFLV>5THENLV=5:GOTO303 

301 IF D$="U" AND U~0 OR D*="D" 
AND D=0 THEN303 

302 GOTO304 

303 PRINT; "I CAN^T MOVE IN THAT 
D I RECT ION": PLAY "LI * AP 1 " : GOTO30 

304 GUSL)B305:ON LV GOTO 326,358. 
381,417,431 

305 ' VARIABLE 5CENERI0 ROUTINE 

306 ON Y GOTO 307,314.316.317,31 
8,319,320.321 , 322 

307 06=0 

308 IFQ1=0TWEN RETURN 

309 IFLV=1 AND Q3< 4 THEN RETURN 

310 Q4=RND < 100- <Q 1*10) > 

311 Q5=INT(100-<Q1*10.3> ) 

312 IF 04OQ5 THEN RETURN 

313 Q6=^l 

314 'MAZE LEVEL VAR SUBROU 

315 IF LV=1 AND VV>1 AND B2=0 TH 
EN PRINT; "A WEB OF STICKY STRING 
-LIKE STRANDS FELL FROM THE 
CEILING OF THE CORRIDOR. I CAN 
'T MOVE VERY WELL -THE MORE I S 
TRUGGLE AGAINST THEM -THE TIGHT 
ER THEY BIND ME „ " : T=0: 0=0: Y=2: 
G0T0447 

316 IF LV=1 AND VV>1 AND B3-0THE 
N PRINT; "SUDDENLY THE AIR IS RES 
OUND I NG W I TH CI I CK I NG . L I TER AL LY 

COVERING THE FLOOR ARE THOUSANDS 
OF MAtjVESCORP IONS. THEY ARE BLOC 
KING ALL ESCAPE AND ARE SLOWLY C 
LOSING IN. ": r«0:O=0: Y=3:G0T0447 

317 IF LV=2 AND HA- 1 AND B4-0 TH 
ENPRINT" THERE ARE FLAMES ALL ARO 
UND ME!! A RING OF FIRE COMPLETEL 
Y SUR- ROUNDS ME ' " : T=0: 0=0: Y=4: 
G0TO44 7 

318 IF LV=4 AND HA=1 AND B5=0 TH 



ENPRINT" IRON BARS HAVE COME DOWN 
FROM THE CEILING!! ALL THE EX 
ITS ARE BLOCKED. ":T=0: 0=0: Y=5: GO 
T0447 

319 IF LV=3 AND HA=1 AND B6=0 TH 
ENPRINT"SUDDENLY ALL THE EXITS A 
RE BLOCKED BY SOLID WALLS. S 
PIKES NOW EXTEND FROM THE EAST 

WALL AND THE WEST WALL IS MOV 
ING IN. HURRY, BEFORE I'M CRUSHED 
! " : T=0: 0=0: Y=6: G0T0447 

320 IF LV=4 AND HA=1 AND B7=0 TH 
ENPRINT" I CAN'T MOVE MY LEGS! TH 
EY SEEM TO BE FROZEN TO THE FLOO 
R. ": T=0:O=0: Y=7:G0T0447 

321 if b8=0 and lv=5 and ha=1 th 
enprint m the floor is dropping!": 
forx=itoi000:next:print"i ? m slid 

ING DOWN A CHUTE' ":FORX=1TO1000: 
NEXT:CLS(0) :FORX=1TO500:NEXT:LV= 

l : WJ---Z: vv=4: B8=i : Y=i : cls: la=0: go 

TO304 

322 IFB9^0 AND LV-5 AND HA=1 THE 
NPRINT"THERE IS A GOBLIN DRESSED 

IN GUARD'S ATTIRE BLOCKING T 
HE WAY. HE HAS A SWORD AT LEAST T 
WICE THE LENGTH OF MINE AND FR 
OM THE LOOKS OF HIS BUILD HE I SN 
> T A PUSHOVER" :T=0: 0=0: Y=9 

323 if b9=0 and lv=5 and ha=1 th 
en forx=itoi000:next:print:print 
"OH OH! ":PRINT"AMOTHER one is be 
HIND ME « ":S0T0447 

324 IFY=9 AND WJ >15- (Ql+1 ) THENP 
RINT"THEY ARE BOTH ATTACKI NG-" : F 
ORX = 1 T 1 500 : NE X T : CLS ( ) : FOR X = 1 TO 
=00: NEXT: CLS : END 

325 HA=0: RETURN 

326 'PIT AND MAZE 

327 IF HV=1 AND VV=I AND WA-1 AN 
D DI = 1 THEN PRINT; "I'M IN THE BO 
TTOM OF THE PIT, UNDER WATER, W 
A IT ING FOR YOU TO TELL ME WHAT 
TO DO' ! ! " :GOTO30 

328 IF HV=1 AND VV=1 AND D1=0 AN 
D WA=1 THENPRINT; " I'M TREADING W 
ATER IN A PIT. IT IS ABOUT EIGHT 

FEET ACROSS IN EACH DIRECTION 
THE HALLS ARE COVERED WITH A 
SLIPPERY GREEN SLIME. I WON'T 

MENTION WHAT THE AIR SMELLS LIK 

E. M :T=0:O S --0:GOTO447 

329 IF HV=1 AND VV^l AND WA-0 AN 
D Di = l THENPRINT; "I'M AT THE BOT 
TOM OF THE PIT. LAYING IN A HE 
AP ON THE FLOOR ARE ENOUGH ASS 
ORTED BONES AND RUSTED EQUIPME 
N! TO MAKE UP PER- HAPS TEN TO TW 
EN1Y KNIGHTS. " : 1=0: Q«2: G0T0447 
ZZ0 IF HV-1 AND VV=1 AND WA=0 AN 



42 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



Quality Hardware and Software 

Support for the TRS 80 

Color Computer 



International 



Soft 



ware s o 



TDPSTI 



TM£ TRS-80 COLOUR COMPUTER 
JOYSTICK INTERFACE' 
PaI PEnOinG 




I0P ST ( X ISA NEW PRiDUCT ON THE MAR 
THIS 'INTERFACE 'WILL ALLOW YOU TO USE 
FAMOUS OF JOYSTICKS NAMELY THE ATAR I 
BUT YOU CAN ALSO USE DATASOFT's Le~S 
THAT HAS TO BE VALUE, SO ORDER YOURS 



KET PLACE 
THE Mi ST 
JOYST IC K 

TICK NOW 
NOW, 



TOP ST I X PRICE IS A LOW 



$29.95 






DEFENSE 
$27.75 



BATTLEFLEET 

$18,95 



GHOST GOBBLER 

$27.75 





SPACE WAR 

$27,75 



CALL OR WRITE FOR ARE FREE 
CATALOGUE , 



GALAX ATTAX 

$27.75 

LOTHAR'S LABYRINTH $10.75 
PLANET INVASION fl£U) $27 ,75 
COLOR COSMIC INVADERS $27. 75 
KEYS OF THE WIZARD $25,75 
MADNESS AND THE MINOTAUR $25,75 

AND LOTS AND LOTS MORE. 

To ORDER SEND CHEQUE OR MONEY ORDER TO ADDRESS BELLOW, WE ALSO TAKE VISA. NO C.O.D.S PLEASE 
WITH CHEQUE PLEASE ALLOW 8 BANKING DAYS FOR CHEQUE" TO CLEAR. PLEASE ALLiW 2 TO 3 WEEKS FOR 
DELIVERY. THANKYOU FOR YOUR ORDER, 



INTERNATIONAL SOFTWARE INC. 





(604) 474 2271 



77 1, I lock ley Avr. , Victor 



H.r. VOH 2V5 



D D1=0 THEN PRINT; M THE WATER HAS 
ALL GONE AND I AM STANDING ON A 
PILE OF JUNK. IT ISTOO DARK TO R 
EALLY TELL WHAT IS IN THE PILE-N 
OT THAT I REALLY WANT TO KNOW 
FROM THE SMELL. " :T=0: 0=0: G0T0447 

331 IF HV=4 AND VV=1 THENPRINT"I 
AM AT THE BOTTOM OF A FLIGHT 

F STEPS. ": 0=3: T=l:G0T0447 

332 Q3=Q3+1 

333 PRINT; M I AM IN A FEATURELESS 
MAZE OF CORRIDORS" 

334 IF HV=1 AND VV=2 THEN 0=5: T = 
0:GOTO447 

335 IF HV=1 AND VV=3 THEN 0=6: T = 
0:GOTO447 

336 IF HV=1 AND VV=4 THEN 0=8: T= 
0:GOTO447 

337 IF HV=1 AND VV=5 THEN 0=6:1= 
0:6OTO447 

333 IF HV=2 AND W=l THEN 0=8: T= 
0:GOTO447 

339 IF HV=2 AND VV=2 THEN 0=5: T= 
0: G0T0447 

340 IF HV=2 AND VV=3 THEN 0=12:1 
=0:GOTO447 

341 IF HV = 2 AND W=4 THEN 0=13:7 
=0:GOTO447 

342 IF HV=^2 AND VV-5 THEN 0-10: T 
=0:OOTO447 

343 IF HV=3 AND W=l THEN 0=9: T= 
0:GOTO447 

344 IF HV=3 AND VV=2 THEN 0=6: T= 
0:GOTO44 7 

345 IF HV«3 AND W=3 THEN 0«8:T= 
0: GOT 04 4 7 

346 IF HV = 3 AND VV-4 THEN 0=7: T- 
0: GOTO 44 7 

34 7 IF HV=3 AND VV=5 THEN 0-10: T 
«0:(3OTO447 

348 IF HV*=4 AND W-5 THEN 0=13: T 
=0:6010447 

349 IF HV~4 AND VV=4 THEN 0*1 i:T 
=0:GOTO447 

350 IF HV=4 AND VV~3 THEN 0*12: T 
^0:6OTO447 

351 IF HV=4 AND W=2 THEN O^ 1 4 : T 
=0: GO I 0447 

352 IF HV=5 AND VV=1 THEN 0=-9:T^ 
0:GOTO447 

353 IF HV«5 AND W*2 THEN 0=12: T 
=0:GOTO447 

354 IF HV-5 AND W = 3 THEN 0«5: T= 
0:GOTO447 

355 IF HV=5 AND VV=4 THEN 0=12: T 
-0:6010447 

356 IF HV=5 AND VV=5 THEN 0=7: T= 
0:GOTO447 

357 PRINT; "LEVEL 1 HV= " ; HV; " VV = 

" ; w: got 030 

44 the RAINBOW January, 1983 



358 ? LEVEL 2 

359 IF VV=1 AND HV=4 THENPRINT"I 
AM AT THE TOP OF A FLIGHT OF S 

TEPS" : T=2: 0=4: G0T0447 

360 IF VV=1 AND HV=3 THENPRINT;A 
* (9) : 0=8: T=0: HA=-1 : G0T0447 

361 IF VV=2 AND HV^3 THENPRINT;A 

$ (9) : 0=12: t=0:ha=i:goto447 

362 IF VV=2 AND HV=2 THENPRINT;A 

% (9) : t=0:o=10: ha=i : G0T0447 

363 IF VV=2 AND HV=1 THENPRINT"! 
'M IN A SMALL EMPTY ROOM. " : HA= 1 : 
7=0: 0=3: G0T0447 

364 IF W=3 AND HV=3 THENPRINT;" 
THIS MUST BE HERMAN'S WORKSHOP! 
THE WALLS ARE LINED WITH SHELVES 
COVERED WITH VARIOUS BOTTLES AND 
VESSELS CONTAINING ALL MANNER OF 
COLORED AND SHAPED SUBSTANCES, A 
DESK IS SITTING IN THE CENTER, 

365 IF HV=3 AND VV=3 THENPRINT"L 
ITERALLY PILED WITH PAPERS. T 
HERE ARE WHAT APPEAR TO BE TWO D 
RAWERS ON THE FRONT OF THE DESK" 
! T=0:D=1 i:G0T04 47 

566 IF W*3 AND RV^4 THENPRINT: A 
* (9) :T=0:O~10:HA=1 :GCT04 47 
16/ IF VV«3 AND HV-5 THENPRINT; A 
$ (9) :T=0:O=9:HA«l:6OTO44 7 
36S IF VV=4 AND HV^Z AND DR=1 TH 
ENPRINT"THERE IS A LARGE DRAGON 
BL0CKIN5THE HALLWAY. IT LOOKS LIK 
E A NQR-MAL GREEN. ILL -TEMPERED, W 
INGED, FIRE -BREATHING DRAGON. A 
PENTAGONSHAPED JEWEL IS HANGING 
AROUND IT'S NECK * " : 1 = : = 5 ; GOTO 
447 

369 IF VV-4 AND HV-3 THENPRINT? A 
$ (9) :T=0:O-5:GOTO44 7 

370 IF W«4 AND HV=5 THENPRINT; A 

*<9> :t«0:o=5:ha~i :G0T04 47 

371 IF VV=5 AND HV-2 THENPRIIMT; " 
I'M I\^ AN EMPTY ROOM, INLAID IS 

A PENTAGON- SHAPED MOSIAC IN THE 
FLOOR, " : 0«3 : T-0: G0T0447 

372 IF RI--0 AND VV^5 AND HV^Z AN 
D DR-1 THENPRINT "I TOLD YOU IT W 
AS A ILL-TEMPEREDF IRE-BREATHING 
DRAGON!! HE'S TURNING ME 

INTO A WELL-DONESNACK. " :F0RX=1T 
03000: NEXT : CL. S ( 0) : FORX - 1 TO 1 000: N 
EXT: CLS:END 

373 IF RI=1 AND VV=5 AND HV-3 AN 
D DR=1 THEN374 ELSE 378 

3/4 PR I NT "1 AM IN FRONT Or THE D 
RAGON. ("HE RING MUST BE WORK: IMG- 1 
F L>OESN J i SEEM TO NOTICE HE,": PR 
INT "VISIBLE DIRECTIONS TO MOVE A 
RE - NORTH -SOU YH l> : PRINT" 7./£ p /;7.X7.% 

;<.xxxxxzxx^xx/:^/C/i%/:'XX/:x M :PLAY ,, Li5 

05 FP10F M : INPUT" WHAT DO YOU WANT 



to do " ;P$: 

375 IF P*="N" THEN T=0: 0=5: W=4: 
HV=3:GOTO304 

376 IF P*="S" THENPRINT M I GOT BY 
IT! AS I WAS GOING BY IGRABBED 

THE NECKLACE OFF IT'S NECK." :D 

r=0:ne=1:t=0:o=7: w=5: hv=3:G0T04 

47 T^0:O=7: W=5:HV=3:GOTO304 

377 print" it must have sensed so 
mething!! it just flash-fried me 
• ■• :forx=ito3000:next:cls<0) :forx 
= i TO500: next :cls: end 

378 IF W=5 AND HV=3 THENPRINT;A 

$(9> :t=0:o=7:ha=i:GOTO447 

379 IF VV=5 AND HV=5 THENPRINT'T 
HE HALLWAY COMES TO A DEAD END.T 
HERE IS A SMALL SACK ON THE F 

loop ■ " : t~0 : 0= i : ha= i : G0T0447 

380 PRINT; "LEVEL 2 HV=";HV5 M W= 
"; W:GOTO30 

331 GENTRY LEVEL 

382 IF HV^Z AND W-5 THEN PRINT" 
I AM ON THE DRAW-BRIDGE AT THE 
FRONT OF THE CASTLE. TO THE 
NORTH IS THE ENTRANCE-THE DOOR 
IS OPEN- TO THE EAST AND WEST IS 
A PATH LEADING AROUND THE MOAT." 

383 IF HV^Z AND VV=5 THEN PRINT" 



TO THE SOUTH IS THE GROUP OF 
TOWNS-PEOPLE WHO CAME TO WATCH. 
IT WOULD BE UNTHINKABLE TO GO 
BACK-THEY ARE COUNTING ON ME.":T 
=0:O=13:GOTO447 

384 IF HV=3 AND VV=4 THEN PRINT" 
I'M IN THE GREAT ENTRY HALL. THE 
VAULTED CEILING IS LOST IN THE 
SHADOWS. THERE IS NO SIGN OF ANY- 



:t=0:o= 



G0T04 



ONE BEING AROUND. 

47" : T=0: HA=1 : 0=5: G0T01 5000 

385 IF HV=4 AND W=4 THENPRINT"T 
HERE IS A CIRCULAR STAIRWAY L 
EADIN6 UPWARDS. A SMALL OPENINGI 
N THE WALL IS THE ONLY SOURCE 
F LIGHT, THE UPPER PART DF THE S 
T AIRWAY IS IN SHADOW" : T«l : 0« 1 : GO 
70447 

386 IF HV«3 AND VV-3 AND WA= 1 TH 
EN PRINT? "THE FLOOR IS TILTING!! 

! I CAN'T MOVE FAST ENOUGH TO GE 
T BACK. ":LA=0:FORX=1TO1500:NEXTX 
:FOR X=1TO30: PRINT; " I'M 

falling ! " : print: fory=1to50: next 
y: nextx:cls(0) 

3S7 IF HV=3 AND VV=3 AND WA=i TH 
ENFORX=1TO500:NEXTX:CLS:PRINT@23 
3, "SPLASH J ! ??" : FPRX = 1TO1000: NEXT 



TRS-80® COLOR COMPUTER® 
SWIVEL ORGANIZER 



CRT 



Cassette 



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ATTRACTIVE AND SOLIDLY BUILT THIS 
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CHECK THESE FEATURES! 

• Water/stain resistant woodgrain laminate 
over 1/2" plywood 

• Metal ball bearing swivel base permits 
sharing of the computer while still seated. 
Great for game playing and multi-use work 
stations 

• Allows TV monitor mounting directly over 
computer to conserve space 

• Storage area in rear with clamps for dressing 
cables neatly 

• Comes fully assembled 

TRS-80 & COLOR COMPUTER TRADEMARKS OF TANDY CORP 






/ 

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omputer 



PLUS SHIPPING 



Send Check Or Money Order To: 



SHAUNTRONICS F airview,n J 07022 



N.J. RESIDENTS ADD 5% TAX 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 45 



x : cls: T=0: 0=0: lv=i : hv=i : w=i : wa= 

HGOTO304 

388 IF HV=Z AND VV=3 AND WA=0 TH 

EN PRINT S, THE FLOOR IS TILTING!!! 

I CAN'T MOVE FAST ENOUGH TO GET 

BACK. H :LA=0:FORX=1TO1500:NEXTX: 

forx-ito30:print; " i ? m f 

ALLING! " :print:fory=ito50:nexty: 

nextx:cls(0) 

339 if hv=z and vv=3 and wa=0 th 

ENFORX=lTO500:NEXTX:CLS:PRINT<a23 
7, "SPLA1 ! 5 ":FGRX=1TO1000:NEXTX:C 
LS:END 

390 IF HV=3 AND VV=2 THEN PRINT 1 ' 
I AM IN THE REAR ENTRANCE HALL": 
T = 0: 0-15: HA=i : G0TQ447 

391 IF HV=4 AND W=2 THEN PRINT" 

M (9) :0^=9: 7=0:ha-i :GOT0447 

392 IF HV = 4 AND VV=3 THEN PRINT" 
I MUST BE IN THE THRONE ROOM. AT 
THE REAR OF THIS LARGE ROOM IS A 
LARGE ORNATE THRONE, ON THE WALL 
BEHIND IT IS A TRIANGLE-SHAPED 
MIRROR. ON EITHER SIDE OF THE 
THRONE ARE PLAIN CHAIRS. LARGE 
TAPESTRIES DEPICTING STRANGE" 

393 IF HV = 4 AND VV=3 AND MI=0 TH 
EN PR I NT "BEINGS HANG IN TATTERS 
FROM THE WALLS. ": 7~&: 0=1 : G0T0447 

394 IF HV = 4 AND VV=3 THENPRINT"B 
EINGS HANG IN TATTERS FROM THE W 
ALLS. mERE IS A DOOORWAY IN THE 
SOUTH WALL. " : T =0: 0=5: G0T0447 

395 If- HV=2 AMD VV=2 THEN PRINT; 
At' (9) : 0=8: T=0:HA=i :G0T04 4~ 7 



>96 IF HV=2 AND 



AND 



)2--0 TH 



EN PRINT "THIS IS THE MAIN HALL. 
SEVERAL LARGE TABLES AND BENCHE 
S ARE IN THE CENTER. MOUNTED AMI 
MAI.. HLADGARE ON THE WALLS. ALONG 
WI I'M BOMCLANCFS. " : T = 0: 0^5: G0TQ44 

'7 

/ 

39/ IF HV-2 AND W = 3 THEN PRINT" 
THIS IS THE MrtIN HALL. SEVERAL 
LARGE TABLES AND BENCHES ARE IN 
THE CENTER. MOUNTED ANIMAL HEADS 
ARE 0^ THE WALLS. AT THE REAR IS 
IS AN OPEN DOOR. " :T=0: 0=5: G0T044 
7 

398 IF HV-2 AND W-4 AND CH--0 TH 
EN PR I NT "THE ROOM IS FULL OF CHE 
SIS. ALL LOOK AS IF THEY HAVE BE 
EN DROKENOPEN EXCEPT ONE. IT SIT 
S ON A SMALL PEDESTAL IN THE C 
ENTER OF THE ROOM. " : T=0: 0= 1 : GOTO 

4 4 7 

39V IF HV--2 AND VV=4 THENF R INT ,S A 
LL THE CHESTS IH 1 HE ROOM ARE 
PEN, I NCI UDING THE ONE ON THE P 
EDESTAL. ": T=0: 0=1 : G0T0447 



400 IF HV=3 AND VV=1 THEN PRINT" 
I AM ON A FOOT BRIDGE LEADING TO 
A REAR ENTRANCE TO THE CASTLE.": 
T=0:O=14:GOTO447 

401 PRINT;" I AM ON A PATH OUTSID 
E THE CAS~ TLE WALLS. THERE IS A 
SLIME COV~ ERED MOAT BETWEEN THE 

CASTLE ANDTHE PATH. " 

402 IF HV=1 AND VV= 1 THEN 0=8: GO 
T0447 

403 IF HV=1 AND W=2 THEN 0=5: GO 
T0447 

404 IF HV=1 AND W=3 THEN 0=5: GO 
T0447 

4 05 IF HV=1 AND VV=4 THEN 0=5: GO 

T0447 

4 06 IF HV«1 AND VV=5 THEN 0=6: GO 

T0447 

4 07 IF HV«2 AND VV=5 THEN 0=10: G 

0T0447 

4 08 IF HV=4 AND VV=5 THEN 0=10: G 

0T0447 

409 IF HV=5 AND VV=5 THEN 0=7: GO 

T0447 

4 10 IF HV-5 AND VV=4 THEN 0=5: GO 

T0447 

411 IF HV=5 AND VV=3 THEN 0=5: GO 
TD447 

412 IF HV=5 AND VV=2 THEN 0-5: GO 
T0447 

4 13 IF HV-5 AND W~l THEN 0=9: GO 

T0447 

4 14 I F H V- 4 AND V V= 1. T HEN Q~ 1 : G 

0T04 47 

4 15 IF HV = 2 AND VV=1 THEN 0=10: G 

0T0447 

4 J. 6 PR I NT ; " LEVEL 3 HV= " ; HV ; " VV= 

"; VV: PRINT; M tttt######-&#tt##ERRQR## 

*«*#«#&#*#'• : GOTO30 

417 'LEVEL 4 

4 18 IF VV=2 AND HV=1 THENPRINT"I 
'M IN AN EMPTY ROOM, INLAID IS A 
PENT AGON-SHAPED MOSIttC IN THE F 
LOUR . " : T = C ; »: 0=2: G0T04 47 
4 19 IF VV -3 AND HV= 1 THENPRINT«A 
*(9) : T-G: 0=1 1 :HA=1 :GQT0447 

420 IF VV=3 AND HV=2 THENPRINT;A 
*(9) :O=10: T=0: HA=1 :G0T0447 

421 IF VV=3 AND HV = 3 AND ST=1 TH 
ENPRINT; A*(9> : PR INI "THERE IS A N 

I CHE WITH A STATUE OF A GARGOYL 
E IN THE NORTH WALL. " : T=0: 0= 1 4 : H 
A=l :GOT04 4 7 

4 22 IF VV = 3 AND W^Z THENPRINT;A 

$(9) : PR! NT "THERE IS A NICHE IN T 

HL NORTH WALL. " : M0:O-1 4: HA~1 : 

G0TU4*7 

42 ■> IF W*3 AND HV-4 AND D3=i TH 

ENPRINT; A* (9) : PRINT; "THERE IS A 

MASSIVE DOOR IN THE EAST WALL." 



46 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



THE PROGRAM M£R'<S GUILD fl?£S£NT3 

BY 

CHARLES F0R5VTHE 

THE ULTIMATE « PAGATION 

ONLY *l<l& UPTO 4PLAY£R$H 

Unlike any ctherVAC" game you've ever seen:! 

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MORE SOUND -MOf?E ACTION- 
MORE FEATURES THAN AM 

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Try VAC' DROtDS'Zr the Outer Limit in pure, 

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OR CALL LOS-W^-tOtS TOR frOO 

AND GET ^fREE'SHtPflN&ANYWRGREONrHE PLANET 
EARTH OR HER COLON/ES 





:t=0:o=4:goto447 

424 IF VV=3 AND HV=4 THENPRINT5A 
$<9) :T=0:O=10:GOTO447 

425 IF VV=3 AND HV=5 THENPRINT"T 
HIS TRULY MUST BE BLANDOR'S OWNR 
OOM.THE WALLS ARE COVERED WITH R 
ICH TAPESTRIES, THE FLOOR IS OF W 
OOD-HIGHLY POLISHED, AND THE F 
URNITURE IS GILTED IN GOLD AND C 
OVERED WITH VARIOUS JEWELS. " : 1=0 
:0=4:G0T0447 

426 IF TS=0 AND VV=4 AND HV=1 TH 
ENPRINT" I'M AT THE BOTTOM OF A F 
LIGHT OFSTAIRS. WELL . ALMOST. THERE 

ARE ONLY FIVE STEPS AT THE B 
OTTOM, THEN AN EMPTY SECTION OF 

ABOUT THIRTY FEET. AND FIVE STE 
PS AT THE TOP NEAR THE CEILING 
. ":T=0:O=l:GOTO447 

427 IF VV-4 AND HV= 1 AND T5=l TH 
ENPRINT" I AM AT THE BOTTOM OF A 
FLIGHT OF STEPS. n : T-l I 0^1 : G0T04 
47 

423 IF VV^4 AND HV^-Z THENPRINT;A 

$ (?) :O«6:T*0:HA=1:GOTO44 7 

429 IF W=4 AND HV»4 THENPR INT" I 



Genesis Software 

presents 
Color Computer Programs 

+ Bigfoot 

Hunt Big foot in a hidden maze of caverns and 
twisting tunnels that are displayed in hi-res graph- 
ics as you move. Seek out the lair of Big foot while 
avoiding perils along the way. Features multiple 
levels and many options of play. Each hunt takes 
place in a new, randomly generated maze. Chal- 
lenging and fun. Requires 32K extended basic. 
Tape cassette (postage paid) $21.95 

* The Enchanted Forest 

The BIG adventure in hi-res graphics is here! Move 
through more than 50 scenes on a quest to rescue 
the captive princess. Decisions are made according 
to visual clues, not text. This is a sophisticated 
computer adventure - a real challenge. Requires 
32K extended basic. 
Tape cassette (postage paid) $21.95 

* The Game Show 

A four-game pack in which two teams compete 
against the clock to name items in a category. Color 
graphics and sound. Requires 16K extended basic 
and joysticks. 
Tape cassette (postage paid) $19. 95 

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Personal checks are welcome - no delay frrxvS 

Missouri residents add 5.625 percent sales tax. 5J2222' 



AM AT THE HEAD OF A FLIGHT OF S 
TEPS" : T=2: 0=4: G0T0447 

430 PRINT; "LEVEL 4 HV=" ; HV; " VV= 

"; w:goto30 

431 'LEVEL 5 

432 IF VV=4 AND HV=1 THENPRINT n I 
AN AT THE TOP OF A FLIGHT OF S 

TEPS 5 ' : T=2: 0=2: G0T0447 

433 IF VV=5 AND HV=1 THENPRINT;A 
$ (9) : T=0: 0=6: HA= 1 : G0T0447 

434 IF VV=5 AND HV=2 THENPRINT;A 

$(9) :T=--0: 0=10: ha=i :G0T0447 

435 IF VV=5 AND HW=Z THENPRINTSA 
$ (9) :T=0:O=7:HA=1 :G0TC447 

436 IF VV=4 AND HV=3 THENPRINTA* 

(9) : T=--0: o=5:ha=1:GOT0447 

437 IF VV=3 AND H\ f = 3 THENPRINT;A 
% i 9 ) : T-0 : 0=8 : HA= 1 : G0T0447 

433 IF VV=3 AND HV=4 THENPRINT;A 

$ (9) :T~0:O~10:HA=1 :G0T0447 

4 39 IF VV~3 AND HV=5 THENPRINT;A 

$ (9) : T=0:O-7:MA-1 :G0T0447 

4 419 IF VV~2 AND HV = 5 THENPPINT5A 

$ (?) :T = 0:Q-5:HA=l:GOTC4 4 7 

44 1 IF VV-1 AND HV«5 THENPRINT;A 

$ -'9) : T-0: 0-9:HA~l :G0T0447 

442 IF VV=*1 AND HV-4 THENPRINT5A 
$ (9) :T=0:O=10:HA«l:GOTO447 

44 3 IF VV=1 AND HV=Z AND D4=l TH 
ENPRINT; A* (9> : PRINT" IN THE SOUTH 
WALL IS ONE BLACK- COLORED BLOC 
K, :1 :HA=1 : T=0:O=3:GOTO447 

444 IF W=l AND H^^'3 THENPRINT;A 
$ (9) :T=0:O=3:HA=l:GOTO447 

445 IF W-2 AND HV=3 THENPRINT"I 
T IS SOME SORT OF SHRINE. THERE A 
RE SEVERAL LARGE WINDOWS IN THER 
00^ -THE DAYLIGHT IS A WELCOME C 
HANGE FROM THE DARKNESS OF THE C 
ASTLE BELOW. AN ALTAR IS LOCATEDI 

N THE CENTER OF THE ROQM. U :T=0:O 
=1 : 8GT0447 

446 PRINT; "LEVEL 5 HV= M ; HV; " W= 

'»; VV:GOTO30 

4 47 D-0: ii-0: N ■■■■-■-■ 0: S=0: E=0: w=i-3 

443 PRINT; A* (1) 

4/19 if r^0 AND 0-0 fHENPRINT; A$ ( 
3) :GOTO30 

450 if T=l THEN PR INT 5 A* (2) :U*=1: 
GOT 0453 

451 IF T-2 THEN PRINT ; A* C3> : D-l : 
GOT 0453 

<J52 IF T^ 
) :u=*i:D=i 

453 ON G0T0454 
? 459, 460, 461 , 462 
,467, 460,469 

454 PR I NT ; A* < 4 ) : N^ I : GO T 030 
4 55 PR I NT 3 A* < 5 ) : S« 1 : GOTO30 
456 PRINT; AS (6) : E«l : GOTO30 



THEN PRINT; A* <2) ; A$ (3 



455, 456, 45" 
463, 464, 46! 



453 
4 66 



48 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



457 PRINT; A* (7) :W=1:GOTO30 

458 PRINT; A* (4) ; A* (5) :N= 1:5=1: GO 
TD30 

459 PRINT; A* (4) 5 A*(6> :N=l:E=l:GO 
TO30 

460 PR I NT ; A* ( 4 ) ; A* ( 7 ) : N= l : w= l : GO 
TO30 

461 prints a*<5> ; a*<6) :s=i:e=i:go 

TO 30 

462 PRINT; A* (5> 5 A* <7) :s=i: w=i:GO 
TO30 

463 PR I NT 5 A* ( 6 ) ; A* ( 7 ) : W= 1 : E= 1 : GO 
TD30 

464 PR I NT; A* (4) ; A* (5) ; A$(6) :N-l: 
S= 1 : E= 1 : GOTO30 

465 PRINT; A*<4) ; A*<5) ; A* <7> :n=i: 
S=l: W=l:GOTO30 

466 PRINT; A* (4) ; A*(6) ; A*(7) :n=i: 
E=l: W=l:GOTO30 

467 PR I NT ; A* ( 5 > « A* ( 6 ) ; A* ( 7 ) : S= 1 : 
E=l: W=l:GOTO30 

4 68 PRINT; A* (4) ; A* (5) ; A$ (6) ; A* (7 

) :n«i:s=i:e=i : w=i:GOTO30 

469 GOTO30 

470 7 A$C1-10) DATA LINES 




471 DATA VISIBLE DIRECTIONS TO M 
OVE ARE-, -UP, -DOWN, -NORTH, -SOUTH 

,-£: AST. -WEST. NOME ,1 AM IN 

A HALLWAY. THE WALLS ANDFLOOR AR 

E SOLID STONE. „ 10 

4 72 DATA LOOK. SLAY, JUMP, LIST. SAY 

, RUB , TURN .LIFT, CUT . STAB 

A 73 DATA C-L I M , GET . UNLO , STAN ■ PULL 

, PUSH . DROP , CARR , BR I B . BRE A 

474 DATA HIT, DIG, BURN, OPEN. PUT, S 

. SPR I , K I CK „ D I VE . W I PE 
, C*(l-40) DATA LINES 
DATA WEB* STRA.SWQR.DAGG. 

NG . SCOR < CHA I < St.. I h , WALL 



MEI 

. R 1 



Li BY 



4 ? 7 DATA OUTL « FL IN, NECK, STAL DUS 

T , DESK « & APE . DRAW , Bill T , VESS 

4 78 DATA PENT , STAT \ NICH. KEY * DOOR 

, F LOG « PLAN , OCT A „ T R I A , M I RR 

4 79 DATA BLOC , CHES , HEX A , SP ID, LAN 

C , HOLE , ALT A , SP I K , BARS , SACK ^ 



Colors Galore 
In PMODE4 




1GK 



Here is an interesting PMODE4 item sent us by R.W. 
Odlin from Sedro-Woolley, Washington. This program, 
which he calls Tartan, will generate stripes, plaids and more 
colors than you may have ever seen emerge from CoCcfs 
amazing interior. 

Just CLOAD, RUN, and when you want to vary the 
program, hit DEL 35. Things get even more interesting — 
and those new colors weave into view — when you DEL 50. 
And, of course, you can strike the shift and @ keys to stop 
and inspect these emerging patterns whenever you want. 

It seems there should be some practical application for 
this one in the hands of a carpet or wallpaper designer. Any 
ideas? 

10 CLS: PM0DE4, 1 : SCREEN 1 . 1 : PELS 

20 POKE65495*0:DIMX (255) , Y (191) . 

A, 8 

30 B=RND(8)H :C=RND<2> : COLORE 

35 GOTO60 

40 FORX=0 TO2555TEPB:LINE(X«0> -( 

X, 191 ) , PSET: NEXT 

50 RUN20 

60 FORY--0 TO19iSTEPB:LINE<0. Y) - ( 

255 , Y ) , P3ET : ME X T : RUN20 



Tired of simplistic Printouts? Wont to use 
your printer's full capacity? 

AT LAST AT LAST 



Useful programs far the 
RS Color Computer 
Home & Small Business 



* Customized for your 
printer 

* Easy to use 



BUDGET ■ Income b expenditure by month ti category. % S 

Gear for taxes 
REMINDER LIST - the most compare fist you ■wi II ever hove \ 
APPOINTMENT DOCK Print an oppoinrmenr calendar 1 

with cmy numoe.r of memos 
C MORII COUNTER - automatically helps you diet 1 

WEIGHT GRAPH - graph your dairy weight 1 

ADDRESS LISTER - maizes labels, printouts 6 alphabetized 1 

lists 
CAR REPAIRS AMI MAINTENANCE LOG graph when 1 

maintenance is needed G heep trad< of repairs 
SALES RECORD - List item . dote ordered . delivered t 

client, prices 
PHONE BOOK ■ Alphabetical Hit to heep with you 1 

Program* supplied on dish ■. odd M GO tfucpng. handling djsK/oasseit* charcj 
DISCOUNT: E3.QQ oft second program fcd.00 eft oil others ord&ed at some time 
complete package pewpoid. Specify: 16-02K. Colette or fa di & k 



FREE FREE FREE 

Grocery list program (14.95 value) with SASE 
Supplied on disk/cassette with order 

Catalogue Available < 

BRUGs A^UUAltb 
* IJf^^T^^ 6609 Westmoreland Ave I 

compreiied character _ . _ , .._. _„,_,_, 

repabijicy Takoma Park. MD '■■■ i-i 

9 32 K recommended (301 ) 2 



Januarv. 19R:3 the raiwroia/ 



AQ 



Adventure Contest — Graphics Winner 




v/ Dung. 



1107 End 



Playing the Great Dungeon Adventure 



By Gregory Ricketts 



Entering the Dungeon 

If you're ready to engage these dire grounds, to face a 
motley mob of menacing monsters and peregrinate the 
perilous pathways of this labyrinth laden with liability, 1 
please CLOA D and ENTER. 

First, load the dungeon-making program entitled 
Dungeon. If instead, you wish to continue an adventure 
already started, you need to load the program entitled 
Adventur, and then follow the directions for loading your 
old party from tape. Let's pretend we're starting an 



HL 



32K I 
ECB J 



Y DAvde 


rHur& 


44F0 


End 


39E0 


1990 


2BB1 


1500 


1CB7 


1000 


0EE6 


500 




Call it the Huerrgen Forrest, dubbed the "death trap' by G. l.'s, wtiere the Germans bore-sighted 
every hill and valley, and tree-bursting shells made diving for cover more deadly than sanding tali. 
Too large to outflank, the Huertgen blocked the approaches to Cologne and the Ruhr: it had to be 
taken. But Hitler had sworn that no invader would ever step foot on German soil, and too many 
pledges had already been broken. And there was another reason, known only to Hitter and a hand- 
ful of trusted staff. Delaying the Americans in the Huertgen Would provide time to assemble and 
unleash Ns attack In the Aidennes. 

Each game turn represents about three days of the acrual.battle. and twenty turns roughly the 
three months it imally took the American forces. Capture the objectives In twenty turns and DRAW, 
reduce the rums and do what the Americans were unable to do prevent the bloodiest American 
battle since the Ovfl War - The Bathe of the Bulge. 

ARK ROYAL GAMES 

P. O. Box 14806 
Jacksonville, FL 32238 

$16.95 16K Ext Cassette 

Allow 14 Days For Checks Florida Residents Add 5% Tax 



50 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



adventure. First load Dungeon, then answer "No" to the 
first question; you need a party of adventurers, not just a 
dungeon. After you have completed making your 
adventuring party, make sure the "play" key on the recorder 
is down, because after the dungeon is generated the next 
program Adventur will be automatically loaded. 

Once Adventur is loaded, you should answer the 
question, "Are you starting a new adventure?" with a "Yes." 
If you were to answer "No," you would be prompted to load 
in your old party. Next, you are instructed in how to set up 
your party members in the order they will first appear in any 
encounter. 

The flashing cursor is controlled by the arrow keys and 
the specified party member is placed with the "P" key. A 
status report can be taken during this routine. 

Movement through the dungeon is pretty self- 
explanatory, the arrow keys are used to move your party. 1 
have included in this phase a status report, and, during this 
phase, the dungeon and your adventuringparty can be saved 
to tape. 1 also have included wandering monsters, so that 
even dungeon areas that should be cleared, signified by the 
X's can be encounter areas, and getting back to the exit 
might be full of peril. 

During the fight sequence, there are still four things each 
party member may do. Movement — which is again 
accomplished by the arrow keys; Fighting — placing the grid 
mentally over the attacking party member and pressing the 
appropriate key for the monsters (1 don't think anyone 
could understand that explanation without the game in 
front of them); Taking a position — which cangiveyou extra 
movement, attack levels, damage factors, defense points, 
and recovery of lost body points; Checking status. 

Whenever you return from town, you must go through the 
adventurer set-up phase. 

My best hint: If you have a certain character you don't 
want to die, namely yourself, have him attack from a 
diagonal while another party member attacks straight on. 
The monster will attack the other party member first. 

Good luck! 

Listing 1 — Dungeon 

1 PCLE AR4 : CLEAR 1 00 , 3 1 000 : D I MDP ( 

64) ,DU(30,30) ,A(400) ,B(400) : GOSU 

B560 

20 CLS: PRINT 1 " HERE ARE SOME TERMS 



PRODUCTS FOR THE 



COMPUTERWARE® 

COLOR COMPUTER 



Radio Shack or TDP-100 



HOME & WORK 



HOME & WORK 



HOME & WORK 







3D DRAWING BOARD 

Draw a simple or complex 
object in three dimensions, 
then rotate, change 
elevation, size & distance of 
your object. Educational & 
entertaining. Extensive 
documentation, including 
examples & sample 
drawings, 
cassette. . .$24.95 
disk. . .$29.95 




ADDRESS FACTORY 

Computerize your mailing 
list for church, business, or 
clubs. This stores Name, 
Address, City, State, Zip, & 
Special Code for each 
person. You can add, 
change, or delete 
information and print either 
mailing labels or lists. 255 
names on disk, 125 on 32K 
cassette, or 55 on 16K 
cassette. 

cassette. . .$17.95 
disk. . .$22.95 



THE COLOR 
CONNECTION 

This is the easiest land most 
complete modem package 
available for the Color 
Computer. 

* Supports both full & half 
duplex 

* You designate the 
required parity 

* MACROS for log-on & 
auto dial 

* Requires only 16K 

* Big buffer for upload & 
download 

* Line wrap does not break 
words 

* 300 baud 
cassette. . $29.95 
disk. . .$39.95 




SEMI DRAW 

Your computer's keyboard 
or joystick draws in 8 colors 
with semi alpha graphics 8, 
12, 24. You can do 
animation and dump your 
screen's picture to a printer 
(Line Printer VII or VIII, 
NEC 8023A). From 6 years 
and up! 
cassette. . .$21.95 



COLOR SCRIBE 
WORD PROCESSOR 

Scribe is the perfect word 
processor as well as a great 
programmer's editor. 
Features include: fast 
change, search, insert, & 
delete; move & copy of a 
line or whole paragraphs; 
text formatting with margin 
justification, automatic 
paging, centering, tabs, 
headings, & footings. You 
can edit files larger than 
memory. Works with LCA- 
47 lower case adapter. 
Radio Shack Disk. . .$49.95 




COLOR DATA 
ORGANIZER 

CDO is a little data base 
system for small inventory 
ideas, remember lists, serial 
numbers, etc. It stores, 
retrieves, sorts, prints, & 
totals whatever you want 
within the two 9 digit 
numeric and two 16 
character string entries, 
cassette. . .$19.95 
disk. . .$29.95 



FINANCE PROGRAMS 

Two great programs, each 
with nine options covering 
loans and investments, 
cassette. . .$17.95 
disk. . .$22.95 




HOME MONEY 
MANAGER 

Organize your income & 
expenses! Not only can you 
balance your checkbook 
but get reports like 
summary of expenses or 
income for the month by 
category. Records up to 480 
transactions by date, "paid- 
to", check number, account 
number, and amount, 
cassette. . .$19.95 



COLOR 



Memory Expansion 

Books • Supplies 

Accessories 



TO ORDER: 

Add shipping of 
$2 surface or $5 
air/Canada Visa 
& MasterCard 
accepted. 



Dealer Inquires Invited 




COMPUTERWARE 



Computerware is a trademark of Computerware. 



call or write 

Box 668 

Encinitas, Ca. 92024 

(714) 436-3512 



MANY POINTS 

WILL HAVE 
EPT FOR THE 
ICH STARTS 



AND THEIR MEANI NGS: " : PR 

INT:PRINT"body poi nts-AMOUNT OF 
DAMAGE A CHARACTER CAN TAKE BEF 
ORE DEATH- " ; : PRI NT"def ense point 
s-THE ABILITY TO WITHSTAND ATT 
ACK WITHOUT TAKING DAMAGE (ARMOR 
OR DEXTERITY) - 

30 PRINT"experience level-AFFECT 
S PLAYERSABILITY TO ATTACK EFFEC 
TIVELY. " :PRINT"damage factor-AMO 
UNT OF DAMAGE DONE TO CREATURES 

THE CHARACTER ATTACKED .": PR I NT@ 
490, "<enter> TO CONTINUE"; 
40 GOSUB540 

50 CLS: INPUT"DO YOU WANT JUST A 
NEW DUNGEON ( Y/N) " ; DE*: I FDE*<> 
,, Y ,, THEN70ELSEPRINT ,, PLACE TAPE WI 
TH ADVENTURES IN THE RECORDER 
AND PRESS PLAY" : INPUT"NAME OF LA 
ST ADVENTURE" ;L$: IFLEN(L*> >8THEN 
L*=LEFT* <L*,8> 
60 CLOADML$:GOTO180 
70 CLS:PRINT"YOU MAY CHOOSE HOW 
YOUR MAIN CHARACTER 
IN THESE AREAS, EXC 
EXPERIENCE LEVEL WH 
AT 4- YOU HAVE 35 
POINTS TO USEAND NONE OF THE LEV 
ELS CAN BE BELOW 5-":P=35 
80 PRINT@288, "BODY POINTS" : PR I NT 
£320 , " DAMAGE FACTOR " : PR I NT©352 , " 
DEFENSE POINTS" 

90 GOSUB550: PRINT@304, ""; : INPUTS 
P(0) :P=P~BP (0) :GOSUB550:PRINT©33 
6, " " ; : INPUTDF(0) :P=P-DF(0) igosub 
550:PRINT©368, " " ; : INPUTP(0) : P=P~ 
P ( ) : GO3UB550 : PR I NT@384 , " " ; : I FP< 
>0THEN70 

1 00 I FBP ( X 50RDF ( X 50RP ( X 5TH 
EN70 

110 INPUT"WHAT NAME FOR YOUR CHA 
RACTER (UNDER 9 LETTERS) "; NM* 
(0) 

120 CLS: INPUT "DO YOU WANT <H>ENC 
HMEN OR <M>ERCENARIES"; 

D % : I FD *« " H u THEN 1 40ELSE I FD*< > " M " T 

HEN 120 

130 CLS: R^RND (4) +1 SPRINT" YOU HAV 

E";R; "MERCENARIES. " :F0RL=1T0 R:B 

P < L ) =--8 : DF ( L > =6 : P ( L > ^6 : NM* ( L ) - " ME 

RCEN ARY " : NE X T : FORL - 1 TO750 : NE X T : 

OTO180 

140 R-RND<3> :FORL=lTO R 

150 BP(L)=RND(9)+3:DF (L)=RND(7)-f 

2:P(L)^RND(7)+2:NEXTL 

160 CLS: PR I NT "henchmen names (UNO 

ER 9 LETTERS) ":PRINT"BODY PO, DA 

MAGE FAC. DEFENSE PO. " ; : FORL= 1 TO 

R 
170 PRINT" " 5BP(L>;" "JDF 



COMPUTER SHACK 



PRINTERS & PRINT RUFFERS 

The COCO hasaserial printportandtouseaprinteryou musteither 
buy a serial printer (they cost more) or buy a converter. Computer 
Shack now has a converter that also stores the data in its memory 
until the printer is ready for it. This is an outstanding feature as most 
printers are fairly slow. 

1 6K Ser to Par $239.00 

1 6 K Ser to Ser $259.00 

X-TRA 1 6K memory $30.00 

C. Itoh Prowriter Parellel $467.00 

C. Itoh Prowriter Serial $579.00 

Epson MX 80 Ft Parellel $529.00 

Epson MX80FT Serial $629.00 



HAVES SMART MODEM 

The very finest modem you can buy for the Color Computer or any 
other computer. Features include auto dial, auto answer, built in 
speaker LED signals auto redial, etc. 
300 Baud $229.00 1 200 Baud $539.00 



COLOR TAPE COPY $15.95 

By Bob Withers 

There have been a few copy programs on the market for the Color 
Computer but none can compare with Color Tape Copy. This program 
is designed so that you don not lose any of yourvaluable programs or 
data bases. 

It will make a backup of any Color ComputerTape: Machine language, 
data, or basic program. 

First load color tape copy into your CC. Then it prompts you to put 
your original copy into the recorder. After it loads the program into 
memory it tells you to put a blank tape into the recorder and press 
the record button. It then writes the program to a new tape. 
You'll never have to worry about your little kids destroying your 
$20.00 tapes. 

COLOR DIRECT FILE 
TRANSFER 

Tape Version $19.95 

By Bob Withers 

Now a program for the Color Computer that allow you to download 
basic programsfrom Bullet-80 systems. It will also send and receive 
programs from other Color Computers, Model I's and Model Ill's. 
Direct FileTransfer(DFT) is a modem program which will handle the 
direct uploading and downloading of machine language, work 
processor files, text files, and basic programs directly to tape with no 
conversion necessary. It is the program you must have to download 
from any Bullet 80 system. DFT also has a chat mode, and has 
software controlled half and/or full duplex. 

It also has a unique feature which can save you much time, it 
automatically converts all model I and III tokens. This allows you to 
run most model I and III basic programs just as they are downloaded 
on your color Computer. This also allows you to send basic programs 
to any model I or III owner who has a copy of DFT. (DFT is very popular 
with the Model I and III). You must have modem. 



COMPUTER SHACK 

1691 Eason • Pontiac, Michigan 48054 
Info: (31 3) 674-2224 • Orders: (800) 392-8881 

Master Charge and VISA OK. Please add $3.00 for shipping in the U.S.A. - $5.00 
for Canada or Mexico - Proper postage outside of U.S. - Canada - Mexico. 
Dealers: We are distributors for all items in this ad. Write for our catalog and 
price list. 



52 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



(L) ; " M ;P(L) : inputnm*<l> :n 
ext 

180 CLS0:FORL=64TO70:PRINT@L,CHR 

$(128) ; "dungeon"; : NEXT: F0RL=224T 

0234: PRINT@L,CHR«M 128) ; "generati 

on"; :NEXTL:FORL=384TO402:PRINT@L 

,CHR*(128> ; "period"; :NEXTL:P0KE6 

5494,0 

190 PLAY"V20O4T2L16DP16DP128DP12 

8DP128L4.FP16L16FP128FP128L8FP64 

L16DP128DP128L8DP64CP6403L4.B-P1 

2804L8CP64DP64E-P64FP64L16FP128F 

P128L1B-P128L803B-P6404CP64L4-DP 

128L16DP128DP128L8FP64DP64L4.CP6 

4L 1 6CP 1 28CP 1 28L8E-P64CP6403B-P64 

04L16DP128DP128L8DP64L16F 

200 PLAY " FP 1 28L8FP48FP48L IF": POK 

E65495,0 

210 FORL=0TO30:FORK=0TO30:DU(L,K 

)=0:NEXTK,L 

220 forl=ito64:readdp:dp(D=dp:n 

EXTL:DATA1,2,3,4,6,8, 10,13,16,18 

,20,22,23,24,25,27, 1,3,4,5,7, 10, 

11,14, 17,20,21,22,24,25,26,29, 1, 

2,4,5,6,9, 11, 15, 16, 19, 21, 22, 23, 2 

5,26,30, 1,2,3,5,7,8,9, 12, 17, 18, 1 

9,22,23,24,26,28:DU(15, 15>=l:DP= 

1 : X=15: Y=15 

230 F0RL = 1T064: IFDP(L)ODP THEN2 

70 

240 XX=0: YY=0: IFL< 17THENAD=32: yy 

--1ELSEIFL>16ANDL<33THENAD=48: XX 

MELSEIFL>32ANDL<49THENAD=0: YY=1 

ELSEIFL>4STHENAD=16: xx=-i 

250 IFX+XX<0ORX+XX>30ORY+YY<0ORY 

+YY>30THEN270 

260 IFDLHX + XX, Y+YY)=0THEN290 

270 NEXT 

280 X=A(SS) : Y=B(SS) :DP=DU(X,Y) :S 

S=SS4-l:PRINT@27,401-BS; : IFST<SS 

ANOST<50THENRESTORE:GOTO210ELSEI 

FST<SS THEN380ELSE230 

290 D1=DP(RND(16)+AD) 

300 IFX + XX^0ANDDK27THEN290ELSEI 

FX4-XX=30ANDDK27THEN290ELSEIFY + Y 

Y=0ANDD1<27THEN290ELSEIFY+YY^30A 

NDDK27THEN290 

310 DU(X+XX, Y+YY)=D1 : F0RL= 1 T064: 

IFDP(L)~DP THENP=P+1 

320 NEXT 

330 I FP> i THENA ( ST > * X : B < 5T ) «Y : ST- 

ST+1: PRINTS* 4 00-ST? 

340 IF3T>399THEM3B0 

350 P^0:FORL=1TG64: IFDP(L>=DP TH 

£NP-P*1 

360 NEXT 

370 IFP>1THENDP=D1 : X=X+X X : Y-Y+YY 

: GOTG230ELSEGOTO230 

380 IFSS=401THEN450ELSEX-A(SS> : Y 

^B(ss) :dp=du(X, Y) :ss-=ss+i 



[PITROCCI FREELANCE ASSOCIATES 

651 N. Houghton Road 
'Tucson, AZ 85746 




(602)296^1041 



The author of ASTROLOGY and ANCIENT WISDOM 
TRILOGY (Copyright Prickly Pear Software) now offers 
quality programs for the 80-C. 

Inspector CLUEseau 

Sherlock Holmes/ Agatha Christie fans-It's finally here— 
A murder mystery game for the 80-C 1 Mr. Goodbody has 
been killed in his mansion and you must solve the 
mystery. WHO committed the murder, WHERE did it 
occur and HOW was it done' Question suspects, find the 
secret passage, and break the code to get clues. Hi-Res 
graphics enhances this excellent game. The computer 
records the clues you obtain on a clue inventory screen 
and also provides suspect descriptions at the touch of a 
finger. A fast, fun game that will sharpen your deductive 
skills. Every game - is different 1 
32K Extended , $1 9.95 

Stress Evaluator 

Assess your present level of stress and how it affects 
your potential for illness. Evaluate the amount of life 
change you can effectively handle in the future. The 
Stress Evaluator is a valuable tool for recognizing, 
measuring and mana'ging stress. The program also 
provides a Coping Ability Test which shows your ability 
to handle stress in general. Provides goal setting 
exercises and meditation graphic screens to help 
achieve stress-alleviating goals. All results output to 
printer. 
16K Extended $24.95 

Weather Watch 

If you really care about the weather, this program is for 
you Three programs provide you with National Weather 
Service approved statistics in a monthly report format. 
Input of daily high and low temp, and rainfall outputs a 
report of monthly average temps, and range; high and 
low averages; high and low temp for month. total rainfall 
days ram> .1 in., heating and cooling degree days, days 
high > 90; days low < 32, days low temp 
< 32 and > 0/ days low < 0; day of highest range. Also 
retrieves a single day from data file for review. All data 
outputs to printer. Well documented 
16K Extended $24.95 

Include $1 .50 for handling for each program. 
Az. Residents add 4% Sales Tax. 
Quantity Discounts to Dealers. 

PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT: Computer Software 
Documentation / Graphics / Consultation 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 



53 



390 F0RL=1T064: IFDP(L)ODP THEN4 

30 

400 XX=0: YY=0: IFL<17THEND1=30: YY 

=-lELSEIFL>16ANDL<33THENDl=28: XX 

=1ELSEIFL>32ANDL<49THEND1=27: YY= 

1ELSEIFL>48THEND1=29: XX=-1 

410 IFDU(X + XX, Y+YY)O0THEN430 

420 DLHX + XX, Y+YY)=D1 

430 NEXTL 

440 IFSS=401THEN450ELSEX=A(SS) : Y 

^B(SS) :dp=du(X, Y) :ss=ss+i :print@ 

27,401-SS; IGOTO390 

450 CLS0:FORL=224TO234:PRINT@L,C 

HR*<128) ; "completed"; :NEXT 

460 J=3 1 000 : FORL=0TO30: FORK=0TO3 

: poke J , du ( L , K ) : J = J + 1 : ne x tk , L : po 

KE31962, 15:P0KE3}963, 15: IFDE*="Y 

"THEN520 

470 v7^32000!L=0 

480 POKE J . BP ( L) : POKE J + 1 , DF ( L) : PO 

KEJ+2,P<L) 

490 IFL=0THENPOKEJ+3,&H27: POKE J + 

4 , ?<H 1 ELSEPOKE J +3 , &H0C : POKE J+4 , 

&HD0 

500 J=J+5:L=L+1 : IFNM*(L)<>""THEN 

480ELSEPOKEJ , 42: J= J + l : L=0 

510 FORK=lTO LEN(NM*<L) > : POKE J , A 

SC<MID*(NM*<L) 9 K, 1) ) : J=J+1:NEXTK 

:L=L+1 :P0KEJ ? 42: J=J+l: IFNM*(L)<> 

" " THEN5 1 0ELSEPOKE J , 255 

520 P0KE65494 , : CLO AD 

530 END 



J IT'S HERE!! 



DYNABYTE SOFTWARE, 

TSASA, INC. PRESENTS 

I COLOR COMPUTER 



* 









M 






BUSINESS & HOME SOFTWARE 

That'll KNOCK Your Mainframe 
OUT! 

50 CASSETTES $8.95-$29.95 

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Business inventory $18.95 

The Billing Solver $19.95 

The Client Tickler $19. C5 

Cash Flow Model $13.95 

The Bidder $14.95 

Linear Regress $16.95 



AND MANY. MANY MORE' 



Checkbook Booky 
At Home Inventory 
Dear Diary 
The Tape Geni 
The Phone Directory 
The Mailman 
Home Budget 

(16KRec.) 



$12.95 
$12.95 
$12.95 
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$13.95 
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FREE CATALOG esq 

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TELEPHONE: 609-346-3063 

Add $1 .50 Postage and Handling and 31 .50 C.O.D. 



Xs NAME 



ADDRESS 



* 
* 



* 
* 

* 

4 






540 K*=INKEY*:R=RND<0) : IFK*=""TH 

EN540ELSERETURN 

550 PRINT@224, "points left";P;:R 

ETURN 

560 P0KE65495, 0: K=l : J=l : G$="by"+ 

CHR*< 128)+"greg"+CHR*< 128)+" rick 

etts" : L$="dungeon"+CHR$ ( 128) +"ad 

venture" : CLS0: FORL=0TO509: PRINT© 

L,CHR*<128) ;CHR*<207) ; : IFL>197AN 

DL<215THENGOSUB590ELSEIFL>461AND 

L<481THENGOSUB600 

570 NEXT 

580 POKE65494,0:PRINT@510,CHR*<1 

28) ; IGOTO610 

590 PRINT@L ? MID* <L* ? J, 1) ; : J=J+1: 

RETURN 

600 PRINT@L,MID*<G*,K, 1) ; :K=K+1: 

RETURN 

610 PLAY"04T5L4DP128L8D+P128L4.E 

P128L8E-P128L4DP128L8C+P128L4DP1 

28L8D+P128L2EP128L8E-P128L4DP128 

L8C+P128L4DP128L8D+P128L4EP128L8 

E-P128L4DPI28L8C+P128L4CP128L803 

BP128AP404DP2DP128DP128C+P128DP1 

28EP128P4L4.EL8F+P4L4.F+L8AP4L2G 

P128L8GP128GP128F+P128ED" 

620 PLAY"P8D+P128EP8E-P128L4DP12 

8L8DP128DP128DP128DP128DP8D+P128 

EP8E-P128L4DP128L8DP128DP128C+P1 

28DF128EP4L4.EL8F+P4L4.F+L8AP4L4 

.GL4GP128L8GP128GP128F+P128GP128 

L4F+P128L8F+P128F+P128GP128G+P12 

8AP12803AP128AP128BP12804C+P128D 

P8C+P128DP8C+P128L3D" 

630 FORL-1TO10:CLS7:CLS8:NEXT:RE 

TURN 

Listing 2 — Adventur 

10 CLS :PCLEAR4: CLEAR 1700, 31 000 ID 

I ML* ( 25 ) , MO* ( 1 9 ) , MC ( 1 ) , MO ( 1 ) , HM ( 

1),MR(1),CY(1),CA(10,2),CP(1L3) 

, MP < 5 1 , 2 ) , P O < i 1 „ 3 ) , N * < 1 1 ) , B < 1 3t ) , 

BP ( 1 1 ) , DF ( 1 1 ) , DP ( 1 1 ) , EX ( 1 1 ) , AL ( 1 

1) :L=RND( -TIMER) 

20 DP* ( 1 ) ="BD18BL5U3HLG2LHLH3U2H 

EU2HL2BU10R3EU3HUE2R2ERE2REUBR10 

D2FRERF2RF2D5FDR3BD10L2G2DFDG2L4 

GL2GD4" 

30 DP* ( 2 ) = " BD 1 8BL5U2HLH3LH2U2HUH 

L3BU10R2E4UER2ER2FRFERER5F2R2ERF 

RFDFDFR2BD10L2GLG2DGDG2LG3D2BU36 

DGL8HU" 

40 DP*<3)="BD18BL5U3H2LH5U3HUEU7 

HU2EUE2UER4EU3BR 1 0D3F2DFRFRFDFD2 

FD5GDFDGD2GDGDG2L3GD3BR13BU13LHU 

8ERBL36RFD8GL" 

50 DP*(4)- J, BD18BL5U2HL2HL2HLHUHU 

4HL2BU10R2E3RERE2R2ERERER2FR2FR2 

F2DF3DFD2F2D2GD6GLG4LG2D2BR13BU1 

3LHUEU3HU2ERBU13BL13GHL2GHG2LHU" 

60 DP$£5)="BD18BL5U3HLH2LHUHU2HU 



54 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



Color Computer Power! 




SCREEN PRINT 



$9.95 

For use with Epson MX-807100 printers. Three print formats, all versions of Basic, 
PMODES 0,2,3&4. Normal or negative image. Written in ML, can be customized by 
POKES. Many other features! Complete Documentation 



DATAFILE 



$19.95 

A unique, multi-purpose data storage system. DATAFILE is a sophisticated, non- 
formatted database with user define categories. It performs string searches, de- 
letes, sorts (with ML Subroutines) and prints in various formats. DATAFILE also 
works with files (Disk) larger than available RAM! Ideal for address lists, catalogu- 
ing, etc. A surprise FREE file is included with each order. Complete documentation. 



DATAFILE 64k 



$24.95 

All the features of the above with much more memory space. Ideal for small business 
applications. DATAFILE is the most versatile Color Computer program of its kind. 

TTD $14.95 DTT $14.95 

Transfer your programs to disk or tape effortlessly. 

STARS $1495 

Educational and entertaining, STARS will create a dome of the night sky on your TV. 
Constellations, stars, and other naked eye objects are drawn using Extended 
Resolution graphics. Special horizon views show theplanets after sunset. Detailed 
documentation. 



Beethoven's Fifth 
William Tell Overture 



$9.95 

$9.95 

You really won't believe the incredible music coming from your Color Computer! "It is withou t a doubt 
the best example of computer music I've ever heard.' 7 (Color Computer News magazine) Now you can 
enjoy these high quality machine language programs at an affordable price. Specify Beethoven or 
William Tell when ordering. 16K & 32K versions on the same tape. 

SPIDER ATTACK $1495 

Shoot-em up action! Now you can stop nasty invading spiders with your joystick 
controlled laser gun. Written in Extended Basic with machine language subroutines 
for fast action. Watch out you don't get eaten! 

MILLBORN $1495 

Like to play cards? From France, we bring you this popular card game for C0C0. The 
object of the game is to drive 700 miles, while avoiding accidents, tire blow-outs, 
detours, etc. Lots of fun! 



*"*N highest 

ilume 



COtORSHOW S14.95 

Music t Color and your C0C0! Just load in CGLORSHOW, connect the 80C to your 
stereo (or simply put a musical tape in your recorder) and watch the fun. Having a 
party? Turn off the room lights, turn up the music and put on COLORSHOW. Works 
great with Rock 'n Roll! 

DISKPRO $2995 

No more crashed disks! This program can be your lifesaver. DISKPRO creates 
back-ups of your disk directory and allocation tables. A valuable tool to protect your 
software. Comes on disk with documentation. 

Add $1.00 postage for each software. Programs available on disk for $5.00 extra. We pay 
highest royalties to software authors. 



j 




Dept. R, 4653 Jeanne Mance St., 
Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2V 4J5 



2HUEU2EUE2UE7FER3FR3FR2F3DFD4FD2 

GD2FDGD2GDG3LGL2D3BR13BU13LHU3EU 

HUE2BU 1 3BL 1 3GLGLHL2GLHUBL 1 3BD 1 3F 

2GD3GD3" 

70 DP$ (6) = M BD18BL5U2EUHU2HU3H2L2 

GL3HL3BU10R3FER2EFRE3U3EU2HU3BR1 

0D4GD2F2D3F2R2E2RFR4BD10L2HL2GLG 

L3HLGD2GDFD4FD2 ,, 

80 DP*(7)= M BD18BL5U5EU2HU3HL3GL3 

H2LGLBU10R3ER7FR7ER2FR3FR2ER6BD1 

0L6HL3GL2GDFD10BU36DG2LHL3HGHU" 

90 DP* ( 8 ) = " BD 1 8BL5U4EU5HUHU6EU6H 

U2EU6BR10D6FD7GDFD2GD6FD3GD5BR13 

BU13LHUHU2EU2E2BL36RFGDFG2FDFGL M 

1 00 DP* ( 9 ) = " BD 1 8BL5U5EUHU2H4L4GL 

4BU10R7FR3E2R5FR2F3D2FD3GD9GD3BR 

13BU13LHUEUHE2U3BU13BL13D2GL3GL2 

HLHU2" 




1 10 DP* (10)="BD18BL5U5EU2HU5HU7E 

2R4FRERFD8FD6GD7BR13BU13HU2EHU2H 

E2BU13BL13GHL5GLHBL13BD13F2D2GDF 

D2GL" 

120 INPUT"ARE YOU STARTING A NEW 

ADVENTURE ( Y/N) " ; L*: IFL*= M Y n THE 
N130ELSECLS:PRINT M PLACE TAPE WIT 
H ADVENTURES IN THE RECORDE 
R PRESS PLAY": INPITT'WHAT WAS THE 

NAME GIVEN TO YOUR LAST ADVENTU 
RE" ;L*: IFLEN(L*> >8THENCL0ADMLEFT 
*(L*,8) :CLSELSECLOADML* 
130 J=32000:L=1 

140 bp(l)=peek(j) :df (l)=peek(j+1 
) :dp(D=peek(j+2) :ex (D = (peek(j + 

3)*256)+PEEK(J+4) : AL (L) =INT (EX ( L 

) /3280+1) : J=J+5:L=L+l: IFPEEK(J)< 

>42THEN140ELSEJ=J+1:L=1 

150 N*(L)=N*(L)+CHR*(PEEK( J) ) : J- 

J + 1 : I FPEEK ( J X >42THEN 1 50ELSE I FPE 

EK ( J+l > -0THENC9-=L: J=J+2: L=l : GOTO 

170ELSEIFPEEK ( J + l ) =255THENC9^L: J 

^j+2:l~ielsej^j+i:l=l+i: goto 150 

160 B(L)=BP(L) :l_=L + l: IFN*(L)<> ,,n 

THEN 160ELSE 190 

170 FORL^ITO C9:B(L)«PEEK(J) : J*J 

+ 1 : next: j= j-m : CR= (peek < J ) *256) +P 

EEKdJ + 1) : J«J+3:FORL=0TO10:CA(L,0 
) -PEEK (J) :CA(L, 1>=PEEK(J+1> :CA(L 
, 2)=PEEK(J+2) : J=J+3: NEXT: IFPEEK( 



J ) =255THEN190ELSEL=1 

180 PO$(L)=PO$(L)+CHR$(PEEK(J) ) : 

J=J + 1 : IFPEEK ( J+l ) =255THEN190ELSE 

IFPEEK (J) =42THENJ= J+l : L=L+1 : GOTO 

180ELSE180 

190 poke65495,0:forl=0to25:readl 
$:l$(D=l*:next:forl=&H7F01 to & 
H7fff:readl*:pokel ? val("&h m +l*> : 
next: forl=0to19: readl*: mo* (l) =l* 
: next: pm0de3: pcls2: pm0de4: get (0, 
0)-(7,7),hm,g: pmode 3 : pcls3 : pmode 
4: get (0, 0> - (7, 7) , mc„ g: pm0de4 
200 pcls0:get(0,0)-(7,7) ,mr,g:po 

KE65494,0:GOSUB810 

210 XP=PEEK (31962) :YP=PEEK (31963 

) : IFPEEK(31480)=1THENPOKE31480 ? 3 

1 

220 PMODE4:COLOR0, llPCLS: SCREEN 1 

,0:POKE65495,0 

230 X = 18: Y*=18:PCLS:F0RJ=YP~2T0 y 

P+2: F0RK=XP~2T0 XP+2: DP=PEEK (310 

00+J*3i+K> : IFDP>30THENDP=DP~30:G 

OSUB2090 

240 G0SUB4 1 : DRAW " BM " +STR* ( X ) + % 

"+STR* (Y) +"A"+STR* ( A) +DP* (L) : X^X 

+37:NEXTK: X=18: Y=Y+37:NEXTJ 

250 L* = " USE " : DRAW " BM 1 92 , 30 " : J=3 : 

GOSUB2070: L*=" ARROW" : DRAWBM200. 

40" : J=^5: GOSUB2070: L*= M KEYS M : J=4: 

DRAWBM224, 50" : GOSUB2070: L*="CAS 

SETTE" : J = 8: DRAWBM192, 170" : GOSUB 

2070:L*="STATUS n : J«6:DRAW"BM192, 

180 U :GOSUB2070 




260 P0KE65495, 0: PUT <88, 88) - (95, 9 
5) , MC,PSET:FORL~lTai00: NEXT: LINE 
(88, 08) (95, 95) , PRESET , BF: K*= INK 
EY* 

270 LINE (88, 88) - (95, 95) , PRESET , B 
F : IFPEEK (342) =247GOSL1B920: K* *=CHR 
* ( 1 > ELSE I FPEEK (341) -2478OSUB960 
:K*- n ' '' ELSE IFPEEK (344) =24760SUB1 
000: K*=CHR* (9) ELSE I FPEEK (343) =24 
7GOSUB1030:K*=CHR*(8>ELSEIFK*=="S 
" 80SUB2 1 30 : GOTO260ELSE I FK*= " C " T H 
EN2180ELSE260 
280 POKE65494,0 

290 IFPEEK (31000 +YP*31+XP) >30AND 
RND < 1 00 ) -69G0SUB2 i 60 : BOTO230 



56 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



(S$\ Arcade Action & Adventure f(^\ 



pftOGftflm 

/TDR6 



For The TRS-80 Color Computer 



PftOGRflm 

rrofte 









rep«u#ta#tion: a place in the 
public esteem or regard; 
a good name. 

The Program Store, one of the 
original software companies of the 
"70s h began to develop its solid 
reputation for selection and service 
right from the start. Today, it offers 
the largest selection of software in 
America, and backs every piece of 
inventory with the trusted Program 
Store name. 



Voyager I 



From Avalon Hi 
You're on board a spaceship infested with killer 
robots in this graphic science fiction game. You must 
clear the 4-level 144-location ship of robots and arm it 
to self-destruct. Can you do it and escape before you, 
too, are blown up? High-speed graphics are repre- 
sented in 3-D perspective representing your eye's 
view; with instant switching to floor plan maps. Ex- 
tended BASIC required. 

16K Tape, 
$19.95 



vc 




From Avalon Hill 
Can you change history? You command the South 
Vietnam army; the computer controls the Viet Cong 
(VC) and North Vietnamese Army. Can you win the 
hearts and minds of the people, and destroy the VC 
units in your province? Challenging operational 
level combat game with hi res graphics. 

16K Tape, 
$19.95 



SHOOTOUT 

AT THE 

OK GALAXY 




From Avalon Hill 

This exciting new game requires fast arcade response 

and well-thought-out strategy. Thirty alien warships 

have entered your Patrol Zone— can you handle your 

defense? Are your shields up? Have you checked your 

energy level? Is your azimuth set? OK then. Good 

Luck! 

16K Tape, $19.95 




Death Planet: 
The Dog Star 
Adventure 



By Lance Micklus from Adventure International 
The beautiful Princess Leya has been captured by 
the evil General Doom. Can you save her, and the 
Royal Treasury, from Doom and his army? Extended 
BASIC required. 

16KTape, 
$19.95 



Avenger 




From Cornsoft 
Pest control in space is not easy! Your Pesticraft is 
armed with laser and pesticide bombs to vaporize 
the almost-endless wave of pests. Watch for the 
AVENGER that tries to stop you. And the birds- 
filled with attacking droids. Get an extra Pesticraft 
for each 10,000 points. Requires 2 joysticks. 

16K Tape, $19.95 

Kraft 

Computer 

Joystick 

Developed specifically for game control, cursor con- 
trol and graphics applications, the Kraft Joystick is 
quick, easy and convenient to use. With two axis 
control; choice of "free-floating" or "spring center 
return" mode, plus pushbutton switch, conveniently 
placed for left thumb operation. 
$64 95 Save $10.00 $54.95 




mm 



Robot Battle 



From Spectral Associates 

Can you dodge the never-ending horde of robots 
while avoiding the fatal touch of the Android? 
Realistic voices and 16 skill levelsprovide a tremen- 
dous arcade type challenge. Does not require Ex- 
tended BASIC; joysticks. 

16K Tape, $21.95 



Monkey 
Kong 




New! 



From Med Systems 
Exciting arcade action with delightful animated 
graphics. You'll need all your speed, skill and man- 
ual dexterity for this one! With increasing levels of 
difficulty, so you won't get bored. For 1 or 2 players, 
or 2-player split control. 



16K Tape, $24.95 

Color 
Haywire 



-Tk Ufc/ 




From Mark Data Products 
Hostile robots await you in a series of dangerous 
rooms. As you fire your laser gun to destroy the 
robots, be sure not to touch the walls or any objects 
you find— they are all electrified! Don't relax for a 
moment... the Indestructible Menace is lurking 
somewhere, ready to demolish everything in his path 
. . .and he cannot be destroyed. Fast-paced 1 or 2 
player game with great colors and sound. Requires 
joystick for each player. 



16 K Tape, $24.95 

Ghost 
Gobbler 






From Spectral Associates 
In this new and exciting version of the popular arcade 
game, use your joysticks to move your Ghost Gobbler 
through the maze, eating dots and power pilts to 
score points. 8 bonus shapes, super sound, and 16 
skill levels. Extended BASIC not required; joysticks. 

16K Tape, $21.95 




By Ken Kalish from Med Systems. 
You are the Phantom Slayer, assigned to enter the 
deadly Catacombs and destroy the mutant Phan- 
toms. You're armed with a laser pistol and proximity 
detector, but be careful — the Phantoms' touch is 
fatal! Real-time machinelanguagegame with hi-res 
3-D graphics and sound. Multiple skill levels; extend- 
ed BASIC not required. 

16K Tape, $19.95 



For Information Call 
202-363-9797 



To Order Call Toil-Free 800-424-2738 



//j^fchepQQQQQm /TflQC 4200 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Dept.24 013 Box 9609 

Visit our other stores: W. Bell Plaza, 6600 Security Blvd., Baltimore, MD • White Flint Mall, N. Bethesda, MD • Olentangy Plaza, B29 Bethel Rd., Columbus OH 
• Seven Corners Center, Falls Church, VA • Coming Soon to Boston, MA 

-_ — , 

'THE PROGRAM STORE • Dept. 24-01-3* Box 9609 • 4200 Wisconsin Avenue, NW • Washington, D.C.20O1 81 



L 

| Item Computer Tape/Disk Price Postage $2.00 Name 

_ _ Totaf . Address. 

!, - - D CHECK DVISA Cj| 

i: 



D MASTERCARD 

Card JL 

© 1383 The Program Store, Inc. 



. State. 



.zip_ 



. Exp_ 



300 IFXP=15AND YP=15THENL*="EXIT 

" : J=4 : DRAW" BM200 ,100": GOSUB2070: 

F0RL=1T05: SOUND240, 2: SOUND150, 2: 

NEXT: LINE (200, 93) -(230, 140) , PRES 

ET,BF ELSE320 

310 K*=INKEY*: IFK$=" "THEN310ELSE 

IFK*="E"THEN1930ELSE270 

320 NU=31000+YP*31+XP: IFPEEK(NU) 

<31THENPOKENU,PEEK<NU)+30ELSE260 

330 FORL=0TO10: IFCA(L,0)=XP ANDC 

A(L,1)=YP THENR=CA(L,2) : GOTO360E 

LSENEXT 

340 IFPEEK(NU)-30>15THEN260ELSEI 

FRNDC6) >2THEN260 

350 R=RND(20)-1 

360 PLAY"V30OlL255T255 n :FORL=lTO 

30: PLAVCDV-" : NEXT: L*=" YOU SPOT" 

: J=8: DRAW" BM 190, 100" : GOSUB2070: L 

=LEN(MO* (R) ) :L*=RIGHT*(MO*(R) . L- 

14) : J=L~14:DRAW"BM180, 110":GOSUB 

2070: L*^" FIGHT" : J=5: DRAW" BM 194, 1 

40" :GOSUB2070 

370 L*="OR RUN" : J=6:DRAW"BM192, 1 

50":GOSUB2070 

380 LS=INKEY*: IFL*=" "THEN380ELSE 

IFL*= M R ,, THEN1060ELSEIFL*= ,, F M GOSU 

B1120ELSE380 

390 GOTO220 

400 GOTO400 

410 IFDP=0ORDP>30THENL=0ELSEON D 



NEW SOFTWARE 

for TRS 80 Model III 

and the Color Computer 



■ Church Contribution System 

designed to simplify and facilitate the tedi- 
ous chore of recording envelopes. Provides a 
variety of reports. Maintains its own data- 
files. Only$i50 

■ Data Base Manager 

designed to help organize all your data and pro- 
vide you with meaningful reports. Add or delete 
any information. New files can be created and 
old information transferred. Only $150 

■ Single Entry Ledger 

designed as an uncomplicated control of 
finances for home or small business. Add, de- 
lete, edit at any time. Compatible with 
DBM. Only $95 

Write or phone for complete software price list. 



UNIVERSAL 

DATA 
k\X RESEARCH 







a VISA* 



2457Wehrle Drive 
Amherst, NY 14221 
716/631-3011 



P GOSUB430,440,450,460,470,480,4 

90 , 500 , 5 1 , 520 , 530 , 540 , 550 , 560 , 5 

70,580,590,600,610,620,630,640,6 

50,660,670,680,690,700,710,720 

420 RETURN 

430 L=l: RETURN 

440 L=2:A=2: RETURN 

450 L=2:A=l: RETURN 

460 L=2:A=0: RETURN 

470 L=2:A=3: RETURN 

480 L=3:A=l: RETURN 

490 L=3:A=0: RETURN 

500 L=4:A=l: RETURN 

510 L=4:A=2: RETURN 

520 L=4:A=0: RETURN 

530 L=4:A=3: RETURN 

540 L=5:A=2: RETURN 

550 L=5:A=l: RETURN 

560 L=5:A=0: RETURN 

570 L=5:A=3: RETURN 

580 L=8:A=l: RETURN 

590 L=8:A=0: RETURN 

600 L=9:A=l: RETURN 

610 L=9:A=2: RETURN 

620 L=9:A=0: RETURN 

630 L=9:A=3: RETURN 

640 L=6: RETURN 

650 L=7:A=2: RETURN 

660 L=7:A=l: RETURN 

670 L=7:A=0: RETURN 

680 L=7:A=3: RETURN 

690 L=10:A=l: RETURN 

700 L=10:A=2: RETURN 

710 L=10:A=0: RETURN 

720 L=10:A=3: RETURN 

730 DATAU4E2F2D2L4R4D2,RU6LR3FDG 

L2R2FDGL3BR4 , BR4BUGL2HU4ER2FDBD4 

, RU6LR3FD4GL2BR3, U3R4L4U3R4BD6L4 

R4, U3R4L4U3R4BD6, BR2BU3R2D2GL2HU 

4ER2FBD5, U6D3R4U3D6, BRR2LU6LR2BR 

BD6, BU2DFREU5BD6, U6BR4G3F3, R4L4U 

6BR4BD6, U6F2E2D6, U6DF4U5D6, R4L4U 

6R4D6, U6R3FDGL3BR4BD3 

740 DATABUU4ER2FD4GL2HBR2BUF2, U6 

R3FDGL3RF3, BUFR2EUHL2HUER2FBD5, B 

U6R4L2D6BR2, NU6R4NU6, BU6D4F2E2U4 

BD6, NU6E2F2NU6, UE2H2UDF2E2UDG2F2 

D, BU6DF2E2UDG2D3BR2, BU6R4DG2LR2L 

G2DR4 

750 DATACC,A,A0,FD,7E,FD,CC,A,B8 

, FD , 7E , FF , 8E , A , A0 , EC , 8 1 , ED , 89 , FB 

, 5E , BC, 7E, FF , 26 , F5 , CC, 0, 20 , F3, 7E 

, FF , FD , 7E , FF , CC , , 20 , F3 , 7E , FD , FD 

, 7E , FD , 8C , 1 D , 58 , 27 , 5 , BE , 7E , FD , 20 

, D9, 39, CC, 19,40, FD,7E,FD,CC, 19,5 

8,FD,7E,FF,8E, 19, 58 , EC, 83, ED, 89, 

4 , A0 , BC , 7E , FD , 26 , F5 , CC 

760 DATAFF , E0, F3, 7E, FF, FD, 7E, FF, 

CC,FF,E0,F3,7E,FD,FD,7E,FD,8C,6, 

, 27 , 5 , BE , 7E , FF , 20 , D9 , 39 , CC , 6 , 4 , 



58 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



FD !I 7E !1 FD !I CC !I 6, 17, FD, 7E, FF, 8E, 6, 4 

, A6 , 80 , 48 , 48 , 48 , 48 , 48 , A7 , 1 B , A6 , 8 

4,44,44,44,AB, 1B,A7, 1B,BC,7E,FF, 

26, E9, CC, 0, 20, F3, 7E , FD, FD, 7E, FD, 

CC, 0, 20, F3, 7E, FF, FD, 7E 

770 DATAFF,BE,7E,FD,8C, 1D,E4,26, 

CF,39,CC,5.,FF,FD !1 7E,FD,CC,6, 12, F 

D,7E,FF,8E,6, 12, A6, 84, 44, 44 , 48, 4 

8,48,48,48,48 !I 48,8B,7F, A7, 5, A6,8 

4,44,44,44,44,44., A7, 4, A6, 82, 48.4 

8, 48, AB, 5, A7, 5, BC, 7E , FD, 26, E9, CC 

,0,20,F3,7E,FD,FD,7E,FD,CC,0,20, 

F3,7E,FF,FD,7E,FF,BE,7E 

780 DATAFF,8C, 1D,F2, 26,C0,39 

790 DATA15252808039500DRAGONS, 15 

101025034500WIZARDS, 101520050437 

50GIANTS,06150804031650OGRES,061 

50700021400LG LIZARDS, 0505051002 

1250SERPENTS, 0509060503 1250PR I ES 

TS , 03050502040750SP I DERS , 1 02030 

6040600BURGULARS,01020600020450G 

IANT ANTS 

800 DATA01040303030550GOBLINS, 01 

040304030600SKELETONS, 0106060201 

0750ZOMBIES, 02080606041 100WERERA 

TS, 041 10603051200HARPIES, 0514060 

505 1500GARGOYLES, 0820080004 1800T 

ROLLS, 10301 500024 125HYDRAS, 1 1 104 

900036300EVIL IDOLS. 183022100599 

99DEM0NS 

810 CP=l:PMODE4:COLOR0, l:PCLS:SC 

reen1 , 0: forl=50to130step20: line ( 
50 ? l)-(150,l+20) , pset.b: next: for 
l=70to130step20:line (l.50)~(l, 15 
0) ,pset: next: l*= n adventurers set 
up ;, :draw"Bmi0, 10 1 *: j»i7:gosub2070 
:l$="hit p to place ": draw "bm 18 

, 20 " : J « 1 6 : GOSUB2070 

B20 L*= M CHARACTER UP" : DRAWBM166 
.40" : J^12:GOSUB2070:L$= M DO NOT P 
UT ADVENTURERS IN SAME BOX 5 ' : DRAW 
"BM0, 181" : J=34: GOSUB2070: L*="FAC 
ING" : DRAW"BM0, 60 M : J=6: GOSUB2070: 
DRAWBM25, 1 00U35NG 15F 15" : X = 56: Y = 

56: xi=0: Y 1=0: l*=" status m : j=6:dra 

WBM0, 140" :GOSUB2070 

830 L*=N*(CP) :DRAW"BM174, 50" : J=L 

EN(N$ (CP) ) :GOSUB2070 

840 GET(X,Y)~(X+7, Y+7) , CY , G 

850 PUT(X, Y)-(X^7, Y+-7) , MC,PSET:P 

UT(X,Y)~(X+7, Y+7> ,MC,NOT 

860 L*=INKEY*: IFL*~ M "THEN850ELSE 

IFL*=CHR* (94)THENY1=-20ELSEIFL*=-- 

CHR$ (10)THENY1=20ELSEIFL*=CHR*(8 

)THENX1=-20ELSEIFL*=CHR*<9)THENX 

1=20ELSEIFL* = "P ,, THEN880ELSEIFL* = 

" S " THENG0SUB2 1 30 : GOTO850ELSE850 

870 IFX + XK560RX + XD1360RY + YK56 

ORYfYl>136THENXl-0:Yl=0:GOTO850E 

LSEPUT(X,Y)-(X+7,Y+7) ,CY,PSET: X= 



* * * * SELECTED SOFTWARE * * * * 

FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER 

All programs are in 16K machine language 
unless noted. Extended basic not required. 

MARK DATA PRODUCTS 

* SPACE RAIDERS New Invader-type game. Super $24.95 
Hi-Res Graphics and Sound. You'll love it. 

* ASTRO BLAST Excellent space shooting game. $24.95 
Super Hi-Res Graphics and Sound. 

* COLOR HAYWIRE Classic arcade game rated A + $24.95 
by Color Computer magazines. 

* CAVE HUNTER Angry creatures pursue you as you $24.95 

hunt for treasures — Great Sound and Colors. 

CALIXTO ISLAND Challenging adventure with $19.95 

occasional twist of humor. 

THE BLACK SANCTUM You will encounter forces $ 1 9.95 

of black magic in this adventure flame. 

SPECTRAL ASSOCIATES 

* GALAX ATTAX Protect your base by shooting alien $21 .95 
fighter in formation. Excellent Graphics and Sound. 

SPACE RACE Maneuver yourself in space but alien $21 .95 

ships appear and must be destroyed. Hi-Res Graphics 
and Sound. 

* PLANET INVASION Destroy wave of aliens while $21 .95 
maneuvering your ship around the planet's surface. 

* SPACE WAR You must break through the enemy $21 .95 
fighters and the defenses of Death Star. 

SPACE INVADERS $21 .95 

Popular Invader game. Fast and Hi-Res Graphics. 

* GHOST GOBBLER Pac Man type game $ 1 9.95 
16 skill level and lots of action. 

KEYS OF THE WIZARD Super adventure game! $ 1 9.95 

Great sound! You never play the same twice. 

MADNESS AND THE MINOTAUR $ 1 9.95 

Challenging adventure game, different everytime. 

MED SYSTEMS 

INVADER'S REVENGE You are the last survived $ 1 9.95 

space invader. You must revenge! 

PHANTOM SLAYER Enter the deadly catacombs $ 1 9.95 

and destroy the phantoms, 3-D Graphics. 

TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

* KATERPILLAR Excellent Centipede-type game. Highly $24.95 
rated by Color Computer magazines! 

* WAR KINGS Hi-Res Graphics with Outstanding $ 1 9.95 
Sound. 

* PROTECTORS (32K) Excellent game. $24.95 

INTELLECTRONICS 

* DUNKEY MUNKEY (32K) Absolutely excellent $21.95 
Donkey Kong-type game. You'll lovo it 1 

STAR FIRE One of the best Defender-type game. $ 1 9.95 

Hi-Res Graphics and Sound. 

THE PROGRAMMER'S GUILD 

PACDROIDS The most challenging Pac Man-type. 

Super Hi-Res Graphics and Sound. Joystick or $ 1 9.95 

Keyboards. 

SOLDERLESS UPGRADE KITS 

Complete kits with easy to follow instructions 
HK-16K $15.95 

16K-32K $29.95 

* Requires Joystick 

Write for complete listings 

Buy 2 items and get 10% off 

We pay postage on all orders 

Send check or money order to: 

SELECTED SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 32228, Fridley, MN 55421 

MN. Residents add 5% sales tax 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 59 



X+Xl: Y=Y+Yl: X1=0: Y1=0:GOTO840 

880 IFCP=1THENPUT (X,Y)~(X+7, Y + 7) 

, MC, PSET ELSEIFN* (CP) = M MERCENARY 

n THENPUT(X, Y)-(X+7, Y+7) , MR, PSET 

ELSEPUT ( X , Y) - ( X+7, Y+7) , HM, PSET 

890 CP<CP,0)=INT( <X-56)*.6+62) :C 

P(CP,2)=CP(CP,0) :CP(CP, 1)=INT ( <Y 

-56) *. 6+133) :CP(CP, 3)=CP(CP, 1 ) :C 

P=CP+1 : I FCP=C9+ 1 THEN900ELSEL I NE ( 

174, 44) -(255,50) , PRESET, BF : G0T08 

30 

900 L*="REDO YES OR NO" : DRAW'BMl 

60, 100" : J=14: GOSUB2070 

910 L*=INKEY*: IFL*="Y"THEN810ELS 

EIFL$= ,, N"THENRETURNELSE910 

920 FORL=104TO1 18: IFPPOINT <92,L) 

=0thenreturnelsenext: GOSUB2100 

930 YP=YP+1 : PUT (88, 125) -<95, 132) 

, MC,PSET:EXEC&H7F01 :LINE(0, 148)- 

(185, 191) , PRESET, BF: X = 18:F0RJ = XP 

-2T0 XP+2:DP=PEEK (31000+ (YP+2) *3 

1+J) : IFDP>30THENDP=DP-30: Y=166:G 

OSUB2090 

940 GOSUB410:DRAW ,, BM ,, +STR*(X)+ , \ 

166A n +STR<MA)+DP$<L) : X=X+37:NEXT 

950 RETURN 

960 FORL=66TO80: IFPPOINT (92,L)=0 

THENRETURNELSENEXT:GOSUB2100 

970 YP=YP-1 : PUT (88, 51 )-<95 5 58) , M 

C , PSET : E XEC&H7F38 : L I NE < , > ■- ( 1 85 




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, 36) , PRESET, BF: X=18: F0RJ=XP-2T0 
XP+2: DP=PEEK (31000+ < YP-2) *31+J ) : 
IFDP>30THENDP=DP-30: Y=18: GOSUB20 

90 

980 GOSUB410: DRAW"BM n +STR* ( X ) + n , 

18A"+STR*(A)+DP*(L) : X=X+37:NEXT 

990 RETURN 

1000 FORL=104TO118: IFPPOINT (L, 92 

) =0Thenreturnelsenext: GOSUB2100 

1010 XP=XP+1:PUT<125,88)-<132,95 

) , MC, PSET: EXEC&H7F6F: LINE ( 1 48, 0) 

-(185, 191 ) , PRESET, BF: Y= 18: FOR J = Y 

P-2T0 YP+2: DP=PEEK <31002+J*31+XP 

) : IFDP>30THENDP=DP-30: X=166: GOSU 

B2090 

1020 GOSUB410:DRAW"BM166, "+STR*< 

Y)+"A U +STR$(A) +DP$(L) : Y=Y+37:NEX 

T: RETURN 

1030 FORL=66TO80: IFPPOINT (L, 92)= 

0THENRETURNELSENEXT: GOSUB2100 

1040 XP=XP~1 :PUT<51,38)-<58, 95) , 

MC,PSET:EXEC&H7FB0:LINE<0,0)~<36 

, 191 ) , PRESET, BF: Y= 18: FOR J=YP~2 T 

OYP+2:DP=PEEK(30998+J*31+XP) : IFD 

P>30THENDP=DP-30: X=18: GOSUB2090 

1050 GOSUB410: DRAW M BM18, "+STR* (Y 

) + " A M +STR* < A) +DP* (L) : Y=Y+37: NEXT 

: RETURN 

1060 FORL=0TO10: IFCA(L,0) OXP AN 

DCA(L,l)OYP THENNEXTELSE1100 

1070 FORL=0TO10: IFCA(L,0) O0THEN 

NEXTELSE1090 

1080 GOTO 1120 

1090 CA(L,0)=XP:CA(L. 1)=YP:CA(L, 

2)=R 

1 100 NU=31000+YP*31+XP:POKENU,PE 

EK <NU) -30: IFK*=CHR$<94)THENYP=YP 

+1ELSEIFK*^CHR$<10)THENYP=YP-1EL 

SEIFK*=CHR* <8) THENXP^XP+IELSEXP" 

XP--1 1110 GOTO220 

1120 > FIGHT SEQUENCE 

1130 PMODE4:COLOR0, 1 :SCREEN1 ,0 

1 140 PCLS:F0RK=23T0179STEP12:F0R 

L=12T0168STEP12: PSET (L, K) : NEXTL, 

K:LINE(0, 1 1)-(180, 191 ) , PSET„B: J= 

LEN<MO*(R) )-15: L$=RIGHT$(MO$(R) , 

J + l ) :DRAW"BM30, 10":GOSUB2070:LS= 

" FIGHT" : J = 6: GOSUB2070: L$="MOVE" 

: J = 4: DRAUPBM184, 150" : GOSUB2070: L 

f^" FIGHT": J»5 

1 150 DRAUPBM184, 160" : GOSUB2070: L 

<*- " POT I ON " : J = 6 : DRAW " BM 1 84 , 1 70 " : G 

OSUB2070:L$= n STATUS" : J=6: DRAW 1 ' BM 

184, 180" :GOSUB2070:CP=l:L*= ,, UP": 

J~2: DRAWBM212, 60" : GOSUB2070 

1160 FORL=lTO RND(6)-1 

1 170 X-INT (RND( 1 43) / 1 2) *12: Y=INT 

(RND(80) /12)*12+11:LINE(X,Y)-(X+ 

RND(4) *12, Y+RND<4)*12) „PSET,BF:N 

EXT 



60 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



1180 SOUND200, l:X=CP(CP ? 0) : Y=CP( 
CP, 1) : IFCP=lTHENPUT<X,Y)-(X+7, Y+ 
7 ) , MC , PSETELSE I FN* ( CP ) = " MERCENAR 
V'THENPUT < X , Y> - < X+7, Y+7) , MR, PSET 
ELSEPUT ( X , Y) - (X + 7, Y+7) , HM« PSET 
1190 CP=CP+l: IFCPOC9+1THEN1180E 
LSEAL=VAL (LEFT* (MO* <R) , 2) > 2 MP (0, 
2) =VAL (MID* (MO* (R) , 3, 2) > : DF=VAL ( 
MID* (MO* (R) ,5, 2) ) :DP=VAL(MID*(MO 
*(R) ,7,2) ) :MP=VAL(MID*(MO*(R> ,9, 

2) ) :nu=0:forl=itoi0:nu=nu+ai_(L> : 

NEXT:NU=INT(NU/ (RND (0) +. 70) /AD 

1200 IFNU>50THENNU=50ELSEIFNLK1T 

HENNU=1 

1210 EX=VAL(MID*(MO*(R) , 11,4) > *N 

U 

1220 FORL=lTO NU-1 : MP (L, 2) =MP (0, 

2) :next 

1230 FORL=0TO NU-1 

1240 X=INT(RND(160)/12)*12+14:Y= 

INK <RND ( 180) +1D/12)* 12 + 1: IFPPO 

INT (X+4, Y+4)=0THEN1240ELSEIFX>59 

ANDX<121ANDY>130THEN1240ELSEMP(L 

, 0) =X : MP (L, 1 ) =Y: PLAY" V30O2T255L2 

55" : FORK=1TO30: PLAY M CCDV- M : NEXT: 

FORK= 1 T05STEP2 : C I RCLE ( X +4 , Y+4 ) , K 

:NEXTK,L 

1250 TT=0: L=RND ( 100) : IFL>50THEN1 

550ELSECP=1 

1260 L*=N*(CP) : J=LEN(L*) : DRAWBM 

184, 70" : GOSUB2070: X=CP (CP, 0) : Y=C 

P(CP, 1 ) :GET(X, Y) -< X+7, Y+7) „CY.G 

1270 DRAW"BM204, 140C0NU30NH15NE1 

5" : PUT ( X , Y ) - < X+7. Y+7 ) , CY , PRESET: 

DRAW " BM204 , 1 40C 1 NU30NH 1 5NE 1 5C0 " : 

PUT < X , Y) - ( X + 7, Y+7) , CY, PSET 

1280 K*=INKEY*: IFK*=" "THEN 1270EL 

SEIFHC*="M"GOSUB1320ELSEIFK*="F"G 

OSUB1380ELSEIFK*="P"GOSUB1500ELS 

EIFK*="S"GOSUB2130:GOTO1270ELSE1 

270 

1290 IFNU=0THEN1730 

1300 cp(CP,0)=x:cp(CP, d=y:line( 

1 84 , 63 ) - ( 255 , 70 ) , PRESET , BF : CP=CP 
+1 : IFCP=C9+1THENTT^TT+1ELSE1260 
1310 IFTT=2THEN1250ELSE1550 
1320 PUT(X,Y> ~<X+7,Y + 7> ,CY,PSET: 
PUT (X , Y) - ( X+7, Y+7) , MO , PRESET 
1330 K*=INKEY*: IFK*= H "THEN1320EL 
SEIFK*=CHR* (94) THENL=Y~6: J=Y~1 : K 
=X ELSEIFK*=CHR*(10)THENL=Y+8: J= 
Y+14:K=X ELSEIFK*=CHR*(8)THENL=X 
-6: j=x-i:k>y ELSEIFK*=CHR* (9) the 
NL=X+8: J=X+14:K=Y ELSEIFK*=CHR*( 
1 3 ) THENCC=0 : PUT < X , Y > - < X +7 , Y+7 > , C 
Y,PSET:RETURNELSE1320 
1340 IFK=X THEN1350ELSEFORLL=L T 
J: IFPPOINT(LL,K)=0THEN1320ELSE 
NEXT:GOTO1360 
1350 FORLL=L TO J : IFPPO I NT <K, LL) 



=0 OR PPOINT(K+1,LL)=0THEN1320EL 

SENEXT 

1360 IFK*=CHR*(94)THENY=Y-12ELSE 

IFK*=CHR* (10)THENY=Y+12ELSEIFK*= 

CHR*(9)THENX=X+12ELSEIFK*=CHR*(8 

>THENX=X-12 

1370 CC=CC+l: IFCC=3+P0(CP, 3) THEN 

CC=0: PUT ( X , Y) - ( X+7, Y+7) , CY, PSET: 

RETURNELSE1320 

1380 L*="E R T": J=5:DRAW"BM190,9 

0" : GOSUB2070: L*="D G" : J=6: DRA 

WBM190, 100":GOSUB2070:L*="C V B 

" : J =5 : DR AW " BM 1 90 , 1 1 " : GOSUB2070 : 

GET (X,Y)- (X+7, Y+7) ,CY,G 

1390 PUT(X,Y)-(X+7, Y+7) ,MO,PRESE 

T:PUT(X,Y)-(X+7, Y+7) ,CY,PSET:K*= 

INKEY*: IFK*=""THEN1390 

1400 IFK*="E"THENX1=-12:Y1=-12EL 

SE I FK*= " R " THEN X 1 =0 : Y 1 =- 1 2ELSE I FK 

$=»T"THENX1=12:Y1=-12ELSEIFK*="G 

"THENX1=12:Y1=0ELSEIFK*="B"THENX 

1=12: Y1=12ELSEIFK*="V"THENX 1=0: Y 

l=12ELSEIFK*= n C"THENXl=-12: Yl=12 

ELSEIFK*="D"THENX1=-12:Y1=0ELSEI 

FK*= "Q" THEN 1440ELSE 1390 

1410 FORL=0TO NU-l: IFMP(L,0)=X+X 

1 ANDMPCL, 1)=Y+Y1 THEN1420ELSENE 

XT:GOTO1390 

1420 L=RND(100) : IFL< (AL(CP)+PO<C 

P,0> >*3-DP+40THEN1450 











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January, 1983 the RAINBOW 61 



1430 FORL=1TO20:PLAY"T255L255V15 
03C04C" : NEXT: DRAW "BM 190, 130":L=R 
ND(8) : IFL=1THENL$="STUPID": J=6:G 
OSUB2070ELSE I FL=2THENL*= " W I MP " : J 
=4 : GOSUB2070ELSE I FL=3THENL*= " LOS 
ER" : J=5: GOSUB2070ELSEIFL=4THENL* 
="SWISH" : J=5: GOSUB2070 
1440 FORL=1TO500: NEXT: LINE (185,8 
0)-(255, 130) , PRESET, BF: RETURN 
1450 PLAY"V20T4L4O3GO4CL3EL4CE" : 
DRAWBM190, 130":L=RND(6) : IFL=1TH 
ENL*="POW": J=3:GOSUB2070ELSEIFL= 
2THENL$="BAM" : J=3: GOSUB2070ELSEI 
FL=3THENL*="CL0BBER" : J=7: GOSUB20 
70ELSEIFL=4THENL*="SLASH": J=5:G0 
SUB2070ELSE I FL=5THENL$= " SMASH " : J 
=5:GOSUB2070 
1460 FORL=1TO500:NEXT 
1470 FORL=0TO NU-1 : IFMP (L, 0) OX + 
XI ORMP(L, DOY+Y1 THENNEXT 
1480 MP(L,2)=MP(L,2)~RND(DF(CP)+ 
PO(CP, 1) ) : IFMP(L,2) >0THENLINE(18 
5, 80) -(255, 130) , PRESET, BF: RETURN 
ELSEF0RJ^1T05STEP2: CIRCLE (MP (L, 
)+4,MP(L, l)+4) , J, l: NEXT: LINE (185 

,80) -(255, 130) , preset, bf 
1490 fork=l to nu-1 : mp (k, 0) =mp (k 
4-1,0) : mp (k, 1)=mp(k + k 1) :mp(k,2) = 
mp <k+i , 2) : next: nu=nu-i : return 

1500 L=l:CLS: PRINT" NONE" 



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1510 printl;po*<d : ifpo*(L+ix>" 

" THENL=L+1 : GOTO 1 5 1 0ELSE I NPUT " wh i 

ch one";L: IFPO$ (L) = ""THENPM0DE4: 

COLOR0, 1 : SCREEN 1 „ 0: RETURN 

1520 IFLEN(PO*(L) > = 15THENP0 (CP, 

) =PO (CP, 0) +RND (4) +4ELSEIFMID* (PO 

*<L) , 11, 1)="H"THENBP(CP)=B(CP)EL 

SEIFMID*(PO*(L> ,11, l)="S"THENPO( 

CP, l)=PO(CP, 1)+RND(10)+8ELSEIFMI 

D$(PO*(L> ,11, 1)="R"THENP0(CP,2)= 

PO (CP, 2) +RND (20) +10ELSEPO (CP, 3 ) = 

7 

1530 FORK=L T09:P0*(K)=P0*(K+1) : 

NEXT:PMODE4:COLOR0, 1 : SCREEN 1 , 0: R 

ETURN 

1540 GOTO1540 

1550 MO=0: J=LEN (MO* (R) )-15;L*=MI 

D$(MO$(R) , 15, J) :DRAW ,, BM184,70" :G 

OSUB2070 

1560 CP=l:HY=300 

1570 L=INT(SQR(ABS(CP(CP„0)-MP(M 

0,0) )^2+ABS(CP<CP, l)-MP(MO, 1 ) ) ^2 

) ) : IFL<HY THENX1=CP(CP,0) : Y1»CP( 

cp< i ) :hy^l:ci=cp 

1580 CP=CP+l: IFCPOC9 + 1THEN1570 

1590 IFHY<20THEN1670ELSEM1=MP: X2 

=MP<MO,0) : Y2=MP(M0, 1) 

1600 IFABS(X1-X2) >ABS(Y1-Y2)ANDP 

PO I NT ( X 2+ 1 6 , Y2+4 ) < >0ANDPPO I NT ( X 2 

+ 17, Y2+4 ) < >0ANDSGN ( X 1 -X 2 ) <>- 1 AND 

X2<169THENX2=X2+12:GOTO1640ELSEI 

FPPOINT ( X2+4, Y2+16X >0ANDPPOINT ( 

X 2+5 , Y2+ 1 6 X >0 ANDSGN ( Y 1 - Y2 ) <>- 1 T 

HENY2=Y2+12:GOTO1640 

1610 IFSGN(X1-X2X>-1ANDPP0INT(X 

2+16, Y2+4X >0ANDPPOINT ( X2+17, Y2+ 

4)< >0ANDX2< 169THENX2=X2+12: GOTOl 

640 

1620 IFABS(X1-X2) >ABS ( Y1-Y2) ANDP 

POINT (X2-8, Y2+4)O0ANDPPOINT(X2- 

7,Y2+4X>0THENX2=X2-12:GOTO1640E 

LSE I FPPO I NT ( X 2+4 , Y2~8 ) < >0ANDPPOI 

NT(X2+5 ? Y2-8)O0ANDSGN(Y2-Y1)=1T 

HENY2=Y2-12:GOTO1640 

1 630 I FPPO I NT ( X2-8 , Y2+4 ) < >0ANDPP 

0INT(X2-7, Y2+4)O0THENX2 = X2-12 

1640 F0RL=1T05STEP2:CIRCLE(MP(M0 

,0) +4, MP (MO, l)+4) ,L, l: NEXT: MP (MO 

,0)=X2:MP(MO, 1)=Y2:SOUND200, 1 : FO 

RL=1T05STEP2: CIRCLE (X2+4, Y2+4) , L 

,0:next:mi^mi-i: ifmi^0ANDMO=nu~i 
then1660elseifm1=0thenmo=mo+1 : go 

TO 1560 

1650 L^INT(SQR(ABS(X1-X2)^2+ABS( 

Y1-Y2) **2) ) : IFL<20ANDMO=NU-1THEN1 

660ELSGIFL<20THENMO=MO+l:GOTO156 

0ELSE1600 

1660 TT-TT+l: IFTT=1THENCP=1:LINE 

( 184, 63) - (255, 70) , PRESET, BF: GOTO 

1 260ELSEL I NE ( 1 84 , 63 ) - ( 255 , 70 ) , PR 



62 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



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ESET,BF:GOTO1250 

1670 F0RL=1T05STEP2: CIRCLE (MP (MO 

, 0) +4, MP (MO, l)+4) , L, 1 : CIRCLE ( MP ( 

MO ,0) +4, MP (MO, l)+4) , L,0:NEXT:L=R 

ND(100) : IFL<AL*3.75-DP(C1)-P0(C1 

,2)+25THEN1690 

1680 L*= "MISSED" : J=6: DRAW" BM 185, 

1 20 " : GOSUB2070 : PLAY " T 1 2L404 V 1 5BA 

GFDEC" :FORL=1TO500: NEXT: LINE (185 

, 113) -(250, 120) , PRESET, BF:MO=MO+ 

l:IFMO=NU THEN1660ELSE1560 

1690 PLAY"T4V25L204DL403B04EL2D0 

3B" : L*= "HIT ": J=3: DRAW" BM 195, 120" 

: GOSUB2070: BP (CI ) =BP (CI ) -RND (DF) 

: GET (XI, Yl)-(Xl+7, Yl+7) ,CY,G:FOR 

L=1TO20:PUT(X1, Yl)-(Xl+7, Yl+7) , C 

Y, PRESET: PUT (X 1 , Yl ) - ( X 1 +7, Yl+7) , 

CY , PSET : NE X T : L I NE ( 1 85 „ 1 1 3 ) - ( 250 , 

120) , PRESET, BF 

1700 MO=MO+l: IFBP(Cl) >0ANDMO=NU 

THEN1660 

1710 IFBP(Cl) >0THEN1560ELSELINE( 

X 1 , Y 1 ) - ( X 1 +7 , Y 1 +7 ) , PRESET , BF : FOR 

L=C1 TO C9 

1715 CP(L,0)=CP(L+1,0) :CP(L, 1)=C 

p<l+i, l) :b(L)=b(l+d :bp(d=bp(l+ 

1) :DF(L)=DF(L+1) :DP(L)=DP(L+1) : A 
L(L)=AL(L+1) :EX (L)=EX (L+l ) :N*(L) 
=N*(L+1) :PO(L,0)=PO(L+1,0) :PO(L, 



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L- A NJ A m A L <-) b «*2 H & mutMim 



1)=P0(L+1, 1) :P0(L,2)=P0(L+1,2) :P 

0(L,3)=P0(L+1,3) :NEXT:LC=l:C9=C9 

-l: IFC1=1THEN2270 

1720 IFM0=NU THEN1660ELSE1560 

1730 ' BOUTY PHASE 

1740 CLS:PRINT"e>tperience collec 

ted";EX*(l-( (AL(1 )-l)*.05) ) :PRIN 

T" credits collected"; :C2=INT(EX/ 

(RND(C9)+1) ) :CR=CR+C2:PRINTC2:PR 

INT-credits to date" ; CR : PRINT"po 

tions collected":L=RND(10) : IFL>A 

L THENPRINT ,, NONE":GOTO1840 

1750 FORL=1TO10: IFPO* (L)=""THEN1 

770ELSENEXT 

1760 PRINT"NONE ,, :GOTO1840 

1770 K=RND(5):0N K GOTO1780, 1790 

, 1800, 1810, 1820 

1780 P0*(L)="P0TI0N OF SKILL":G0 

TO1830 

1790 P0*(L)="P0TI0N OF HEALING": 

GOTO1830 

1800 P0*(L)="P0TI0N OF STRENGTH" 

:GOTO1830 

1810 P0*(L)="P0TI0N OF REFLEXES" 

:GOTO1830 

1820 P0*(L)="P0TI0N OF QUICKNESS 

■I 

1830 PRINTP0*(L) 

1840 PR I NT : PR I NT : PR I NT "< en t er > " : 

EX=EX*(l-< <AL(1)-1)*.05) > 

1850 K=C9-1 

I860 IFKO0THENFORL=2TO C9:IFN*( 

L) <>" MERCENARY" THEN EX (L)=EX (L) + 

EX/2/K: NEXTELSENEXT 

1870 EX (1)=EX (D+EX/2 

1880 l*=inkey*: ifl*=" "then1 880 
1890 f0rl=1t0 c9: al=al (l ) : al (l) = 
int (ex (l) /3280 + 1) : ifaloal (l) the 
nb (l) =b (l ) +rnd (2> : nextelsenext 
1900 forl=itoi0:fork=0TO3:po(L,k 

)=0:NEXTK,L 

1910 IFAL(1)=20THEN2280 

1920 IFLC=1THENLC=0:GOTO810ELSEF 

ORL=1TO10:CP(L,0)=CP(L,2) :CP(L, 1 

)=CP(L,3) : NEXT: RETURN 

1930 CLS: PR I NT "STAYING IN TOWN H 

AS COST YOU":L=RND(100)+100:PRIN 

TL? "CREDITS":CR=CR-L:F0RL=1T0 C9 

: BP (L ) =B (L) : NEXT: GOSUB2120 

1940 G0SUB21 10: PRINT" ( 1 ) DO YOU W 

ANT TO GAIN LEVELS. " : PRINT" (2) HI 

RE ON HENCHMEN, MERCENARIES" ;: PR 

INT"(3)G0 BACK TO THE DUNGEON.": 

INPUTL: IFL=3GOSUB810:GOTO220ELSE 

IFL=1THEN1950ELSEIFL=2THEN1990EL 

SE1940 

1950 CLS:GO3UB2110:FORL=1TO C9:P 

rintl;n*<d :next: input m who is to 

GAIN EXPERIENCE" ;L: IFN*(L)=""TH 
ENCLS:GOTO1940 



64 the RAINBOW January, 1983 



1960 INPUT"HOW MANY CREDITS ARE 
YOU SPENDING" ;K: IFK<0THEN 
1950ELSEIFK>CR THENK=CR 
1 970 EX = ( RND ( ) + . 5 > *CR : PR I NT " YOU 
HAVE GAINED ";:PRINT USING M #.## 
"5EX/3280; :PRINT M PERCENT OF 
A LEVEL" : EX (L)=EX <L> +EX : AL=AL (L> 
:AL(L)=INT(EX (L) /3280+1) : CR=CR-K 



:print:print" 



< enter! 



IFAL< 



>AL (L) THENB (L) =B (L) +RND (2) 

1980 K*=INKEY*: IFK$= " "THEN1980EL 

SECLS:GOTO1940 

1990 CLS:GOSUB2110 

2000 IFC9=10THENPRINT"NO ONE WAN 

TS A JOB":ELSE2020 

2010 K*=INKEY*: IFK$= MM THEN2010EL 

SECLS:GOTO1940 

2020 PRINT"HENCHMEN COST 2000 CR 

EDITS":PRINT"MERCENARIES COST 15 

00 CREDITS": PRINT"ENTER CREDIT 

S FOR NEITHER": INPUT" AMOUNT" ;L: I 

FL=1500THENCR=CR-L:GOSUB2120:GOT 

O2030ELSEIFL=2000THENCR=CR-L:GOS 

UB2120:8OTO2040ELSECLS: GOTO 1940 

2030 C9=--C9+l : L=C9: N$ <L> ="MERCENA 

ry" :bp<l)=8:bcl)=8:df(L)=6:dp(L) 

-6: EX (L)=3300:AL(L)=2:CLS:GOTO19 
40 

2040 C9=C9+ 1 : L=C9: BP <L) -RND (8) +3 
:DF<L)=RND(7>+2:DP<L>=RND<7>+2:B 
(L)«BP(L) :EX <L)»3300:AL(L)«2:PRI 
NT"WHAT NAME FOR YOUR HENCHMAN 
(UNDER 9 LETTERS) ": PR I NT" BODY 
PT/DAMAGE FAC- /DEFENSE PTS." ;:P 
RINTTAB(4)B(L) ; TAB ( 15) DF (L) ; TAB ( 
27)DP(L) 

2050 inputl*:n$(d=l*:cls:gotoi9 

40 

2060 GOTO2060 

2070 FORL= 1 TO J : LL= ASC ( M I D* ( L* , L 

, 1 ) ) -65: IFLL<0THENDRAW"A0BR4"ELS 

EDRAW"A0C0"+L*(LL}+"BR4" 

2080 NEXT: RETURN 

2090 DRAW " BM " +STR* ( X ) + " , " +STR$ ( Y 

) + f, NE2NF2NG2H2" : RETURN 

2 1 00 DRAW " BM92 , 92NE2NF2NG2H2 " : RE 

TURN 

2110 PR I NT "you have"?CR; "credits 

" : RETURN 

2120 IFCR<0GOTO2260ELSERETURN 

2130 CLS: PRINT" ATT. LVL. /BOD 

Y/DAM FAC. /DEF. "5 

2140 FORK-1TO C9: PRINTN* (K) ? : PRI 

NTTAB ( 10) AL <K> +PO (K, 0) % TAB ( 14) BP 

(K) STAB (21) DF (K) +POCK, 1) 5 TAB (27) 

DP(K)+P0<K,2) : NEXT: PRINT: PRINT"C 

RED ITS "SCR 

2 X 50 K*= I NKE Y$ : I FK*= " " THEN2 1 50EL 

3EPH0DE4: COLOR0, 1 : SCREEN 1 ,0: RETU 

RN 



New Color Computer Products 

• Universal Program 1 (UP-1 ) * 

The Program Stacking Program. UP-1 allows 
several programs to be loaded until the memory is 
filled. Quickly jump from one program to another 
or compose new ones while retaining the old ones. 
Programs included for patching damaged 
programs. UP-1 also allows text to be stored in 
memory and printed on an external 
printer. Cassette $14.95 
• Disassembler-Assembler (DISASM) • 

Using English mnemonics and decimal locations, 
DISASM is a quick way to learn to assemble machine 
language programs. Analyze the CC ROMS plus ML 
programs with the disassembler. Cassette $19.95 

• Dynamic Word Processor (DYWORD) • 

Organize text into remark statements with DYWORD's 
machine language subroutine, which quickly prints to 
screen or an external printer. Use the LIST command to 
quickly review the text. Only the start and ending 
statement numbers need be entered for execution. No 
more arrays, CHR$(N), PRINT#-2, or other awkward 
commands are required. Enter exactly what you want 
printed in the statements, including printer control 
commands. Allows printing form letters, purchase 
orders, personal and business letters. No extra memory 
is required and the Basic Control Program is easily 
modified. Cassette $24.95 
16K Computer Required Programs Do Not Require Ext. Basic 



Game Cartridge Modifications 

• Dynamic Interrupt Modification (DIM) • 

This modification includes adding a push button 
which, when engaged, causes an interrupt. The 
computer then runs a machine language subroutine 
after which it returns to its previous task. Examples 
include printing the characters on the screen to an 
external printer and saving the screen to memory. The 
Auto Start feature is disabled and the game is run by 
EXEC 49152. Example programs are included. Send 
Cart & $15.95. 

• EPROM Socket Addition (ESA) • 

This modification involves adding a socket and switch 
to select the EPROM or game. A 4K or less Basic or 
machine language program can be placed in the 
EPROM. Send Cart and $18.95. 

Both DIM and ESA updates to the same cart for only 
$29.95. 

EPROM PROGRAMMING 

You can run your Basic programs from an EPROM 
installed in a game cartridge and save all your computer's 
memory for other purposes. The program cannot be 
destroyed and is instantly available. If your program is 4K or 
less we will program it for $10, plus $10 for the EPROM. 
Reprogramming fee is $10. Send two copies of your 
program on a cassette. 

Programming Service 

We write programs for business, scientific uses or 
educational purposes. Send as much detail aspossibleplus 
$10 to cover our evaluation expenses and we will send you a 
quote. 

VISA and MC Cards accepted Add $1 for programs, $2 for mods s/h 

DYNAMIC ELECTRONICS 

P. O. Box 896 (205) 773-2758 

Hartselle, AL 35640 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 65 



2160 play"v31l255t25504":f0rl=1t 
030: play"bagfedcv-": next: play"02 
v31l20t20bag":forl=1to30:play"gv 
-":next:pcls:l*="your party has 

BEEN SURPRISED BY" : J=32: DRAWBM1 

0, 80" : GOSUB2070: DRAWBRBURULDBU3 

RULD" : R=RND (20) -1 : J=LEN <M0* (R) ) - 

14 

2170 L*=RIGHT*(M0*(R) , J) :DRAW"BM 

99, 90" : GOSUB2070: F0RL=1 TO 1000: NE 

XT: G0SUB1 120: PM0DE4: COLOR0, 1 : PCL 

S: SGREEN1 , 0: RETURN 

2180 CLS: INPUT u DO YOU WISH TO SA 

VE DUNGEON ( Y/N) " ; L$: IFL*="N 

"THENPM0DE4: COLOR0, 1 : SCREEN 1 , 0: G 

OTO260 

2190 P0KE65495, 0: J=32000: F0RL=1T 

o C9:pokej,bp(L) :pokej+i,df(d :p 

0KEJ+2,DP(L) :L*=HEX*(EX (L) ) : POKE 
J+3, VAL ( "&H"+LEFT* <L* ? LEN <L*) -2) 
) :P0KEJ+4.VAL("&H"+RIGHT*<L*,2) ) 

: j=j+5:next:pokej,42: j=j + i 
2200 f0rl=1t0 c9:f0rk=1t0 len(n* 
(D ) :pokej,asc<mid*<n*<l) ,k, l) ) : 
j=jm:next:pokej,42: j=j+i:next:p 
okej,0: j=j + i:forl=ito C9:P0KEJ,B 
(L> : j=j+i :next:pokej,42:l*=hex*( 
cr> : iflen(L*)<3thenpokej + i.,0:pok 
ej+2, val ( "&h"+l*) : pokej+3, 42: got 

02220 

2210 POKEJ + 1 , VAL < n &H"+LEFT* <L* ,L 





CCLOE-STICK 

'HERE AT LAST 1 

Finally an interface for the 
TRS-80* Color Computer 
to let you use the famous: 

f ATARI* JOYSTICK' 

Just plug your Atari or Atari like (the Color-Stick 
enables the use of most joysticks made for the 
Atari) joystick into the Color-Stick interface and 
then plug the Color-Stick into an empty joystick 
port. 

The Color-Stick can improve scores 50% and 
more while making some games more exciting 
and fun to play. 

Color-Stick interface $19.95 each OR 

Two for $34.95. (less joysticks) 

Atari Joysticks $9.95 each. 

getter 

Software Company 

% ^ P.O. Box 2770 

Greenville, South Carolina 29602 
(803) 295-3648 



Add $2.00 per order shipping and handling. Bank cards welcomed (please 
incl ude expiration date). Orders paid by cashiers check, money orders, bank 
cards and C.O.D. are shipped within 48 hours. Personal checks please allow 1-2 
weeks. COD. orders add $1.50 extra. S.C. residents add 4% sales tax. 
*TRS-80 is a registered trademark of Tandy Corp. Atari is a registered trademark 
of Atari, Inc. 



EN(L*)-2) ) 
T*(L*,2) > : 
2220 J=J+4 

, 0) :pokej+ 
,2) : J=J+3: 

2230 IFPO* 
N(P0*(L) ) 
MID$(P0$(L 
KEJ,42: J=J 
2240 POKEJ 



: POKE J +2 , V AL < " &H M +R I GH 
POKEJ+3,42 

forl=0toi0:pokej !I ca(l 
1,ca(l, 1 ) :p0kej+2.,ca<l 
next:l=i 

(L) =" U THEN2240ELSEK=LE 
F0RLL=1T0 K : POKEJ ,ASC< 

) ,ll, l) > : j=j+i:next:po 

+i:l=l+i:goto2230 

, 255: p0ke31 962, xp: poke 




31963, yp:print m place tape of adv 

ENTURES IN RECORDER PRESS 

PLAY ?< RECORD": INPUT"NAME OF CU 

RRENT ADVENTURE" ; L*: IFLEN <L*> >8T 

HENL$=LEFT*(L*,8> 

2250 POKE65494„0:CSAVEML$, 31000, 

32767,0: END 

2260 CLS:PRINT@100, "THERE ARE NO 
LOANS MADE IN THIS GAME 

BUDDY, YOU'RE GOING 

TO JAIL. ":PRIIMT@400, "GAME OVER" 

:forl=i to 1000: next: end 

2270 FORL=1TO10:SCREEN1, i: screen 

1 , 0: NEXT: PLAY"V31T2L202BP64BP64L 

8BP64L2B03P64DP64L8D-P64L4D-P64L 

402BP64BP64B-P64L1B" : END 

2280 FORL= 1 TO 1000: NEXT: P0KE65495 

, 0: CLS0: L*^=CHR* ( 1 28) : CO*=L*+"you 

"+L*V'have l, +L* + "attained"+L$+"je 

d i " +L*+ " k ni ght " +-L* : FORL=0TO224 : P 

RINT@L.,C0$; :NEXT:POKE65494,0:PLA 

Y" T30L4V30" : FORL=1TO30: PLAY"03G0 

4CL3EL4CEV-" : NEXT 

2290 FORK=1TO100:L=RND( 15)-l: IFL 

=7thennextelsec=143+1 6* (rnd (8) -1 
) :print@l*32„ strings 32,0 ; :next 

2300 FORL^0TO14: IFL ^=7THENNEXTELS 

EPRINT£L*32 9 STRING* (32, 128) ; :NEX 

T: FORL=224TO0STEP-1 : PRINTQL, co$; 

:NEXT:F0RL=1T015:PRINT@L^32 ? C0*; 

: NEXT : FORL = 0TO 1 4 : PR I NT@L*32 , STRI 

NB*<32, 128) ; :next 

2310 FORL=1TO30:PRINT@L-1,MID*(C 

GU^L, 1 ) ; :PRINT@L+479,CHR*(128) 5 : 

NEXT:CN*^"congratulations ,, +L*+"c 

hamp":K~0 

2320 L=RND(21) : IFMID* <CN$, L ., 1)=" 

X ,, THEN2320ELSEPRINT@228+L ? MID* (C 

n*,l, l) ; :mid*(cn*,l, i)="X":k=k+i 

: IFKO21THEN2320 

2330 PRINT@350, ""; : END 



66 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



Turn your 

color computer on 

to the power of 

FLEX 

NOW FROM THE WORLDS LARGEST SUPPLIER OF SOFTWARE FOR FLEX 
COMES FHL COLOR FLEX- JUST LOOK AT THESE FEATURES: 



IF YOU'RE TIRED OF 
NO DISK SOFTWARE, 

THEN FHL Color FLEX 
IS THE ANSWER 



FLEX is the world's most popular operating 
system for the 6809 and with over 100 
programs, we are the largest supplier of 
software for FLEX. These programs are 
NOT games but serious programs for your 
Color Computer. They range from word 
processors thru business applications to 
software development tools. Many Fortune 
500 companies use our software. 
FHL Color FLEX turns your Color computer 
into a powerful system more capable than 
systems costing several times as much. 

Get on our mailing list, call or send 
for our complete catalog of over 100 
products for FLEX, Wa're doing 
exciting things with your color 
computer! 



_J 


**Mi 


/Mm 






! 






EL 

71 



FLEX NOW ONLY $99 

H1-RE5 screen formats 
* 16 x 32 and 24 x 51, upper and lower 
case characters 

* 24 x 64 and 32 x 64 upper case 
* Full ASCII keyboards 
h%. * Easy start-up— just type RUN ' L FLEX" 
• Online assistance just type HELP 
• Optionally use a standard terminal 

and printer 
* Advance disk I/O and terminal 

capabilities 
" NO additional hardware required 
• We have supported FLEX with 
k { more software than anyone else in 
I the world for more than 2 years! 



SPECIAL 

1. DBASIC, RS Disk Basic 
under FLEX with a utility to 
copy RS to FLEX disk $30, 

2. ED/ASM line and screen 
editor and macro assembler, 
both more powerful than 
TSC T s, and at the same cost, 
only $100. 

3. UTILITIES, a set of 12 
utilities especially designed 
for FHL CrW FLEX $50. 

4. STYLOGR,?. J H full word 
processor. Special for FHL 
Color FLEX only. $195.00 




THE REGENCY TOWER 
7TO JAMES ST. -SYRACUSE, NY 1 3203 

TELEX 646740 -(315)474-7856 = = = 

"FLEX is a trademark of Technical Systems Consultants Inc. 



FRANK 
HOGG 



THE SOLUTION — AND WHY WE BUILT IT. 



When we first introduced FLEX for the 
CoCo in February 1982 we received hundreds 
of calls from software and hardware 
developers who wanted to use the CoCo 
because it was so inexpensive compared to 
everything else on the market. However 
there is not enough in the CoCo to make 
this possible for most of these users. I know 
that the CoCo is viable in most cases, but 
for many, there needed to be more. So that 
was the original reason for designing the 
expansion board we call 'THE SOLUTION 1 . 



After we finished the design we looked 
at what we had and tried to find a name for 
it. While I was trying to think of a name for 
this product that solved all the deficiencies 
that the CoCo had the name was obvious. 
The Solution solves all the deficiencies that 
we found in the CoCo so we named it f THE 
SOLUTION 1 . 



The solution is housed in a metal case 
that plugs into the side of the CoCo. Inside 
are two boards, the buffer board and the 
motherboard. Tne buffer board connects to 
the port of the CoCo and is mounted to the 
side of the solutions case. The motherboard 
connects to the buffer board via a ribbon 



cable. The motherboard has the 2K/4K 
EPROM sockett with a 4K monitor EPROM in 
it. Also inside are 4 vertical connectors for 
internally mounted boards or ROM type 
cartridges. The fifth connector is horizontal 
and is made for the disk controller, ROM 
cartridges or additional expansion out the 
side of the solution. A four position dip 
switch allows for 3 options to be selected. 
One option will cause the CoCo to get its 
interrupt and reset vectors from the monitor 
instead of RS Basic. Another option makes 
the system come up in the monitor instead of 
RS Basic. While another option lets the 
CoCC come up in the monitor on the ACIA 
serial port that would be hooked to a 
terminal. This last option means that it is 
unnecessary to have the CoCo nearby to run 
FLEX or OS-9. Also if you choose to come 
up in the monitor then it is not necessary to 
have RS Extended Basic in the CoCo to ooot 
FLEX because the monitor has a boot built 
in to it. This save #100.00 or half of the 
cost of the solution. The power supply is a 
plug in the wall type with a connector in 
the back of the case. The back of the case 
is open and it is thru this that all the cables 
for the different cards go. This makes for a 
very neat appearance. The solution is painted 
black to match both the CoCo and the 
System 100. 



THE SOLUTION 



#249.00 

#199.95 until Jan 31, 1983 



Cards for the solution. These prices and delivery dates are an estimate, subject to 
change without notice. Call for confirmation. Price includes case and power supply. 

DUAL SERIAL PORT #150.00 

Two 6551 ACIAs, programmable baud rates, full RS-232, DB-25 conn. Avail 12/20/82 

PARALLEL PRINTER card # 99 o 00 

Includes 4 1 cable. Aval Jan 15,1983 

CLOCK #110.00 

OKI clock w/battery backup and 1 parallel output port. Avail Jan 30,1983 

PROTOTYPE cards # 37,00 

3 1/2 by 9 inch card. Avail Jan 30, 1983 

EP ROM/RAM card # 90.00 

Up to 16K ROM (2732) or 8K static RAM (6116), Each device individualy addressed 
anywhere in memory. Avail Feb 15,1983 



EPROM programmer #165.00 

Program 2K, 4K or 8K eproms. software included either on disk or on board ROM. 
Avail Feb 28, 1983 

TRIPLE PARALLEL I/O card #105.00 

Two 6821s and 1 6522 for parallel I/O. Avail March 83. 

NOTE: We are considering several other cards for the solution. Please let us know 
what you want, if there is enough interest we will make it. 

FRANK 

HOGG 

LABORATORY 




THE REGENCY TOWER»770 JAMES ST. • SYRACUSE, NY 13203* TELEX 646740»(3 15) 474-7856 



NOW. . . FROM THE 
WORLDS LARGEST 
SUPPLIER OF 
SOFTWARE... 




COMES THE 
WORLDS LARGEST 
SOFTWARE 
CATALOG 

SEE THE LATEST REVIEWS 
OF OUR SOFTWARE 



November '82 MICRO 

"FLEX and the TRS-80 Color Computer' 

by Ronald Anderson, Page 23. 

November '82 80 MICRO 

"Color Forth" 

by Jake Commander, Page 45. 

November '82 68 MICRO JOURNAL 

"CC FORTH" 

by James Perotti, Page 19. 



October '82 RAINBOW 

A comparison of FHL Color Flex to 68 Micro 

Journal's (Data-Comp) FLEX, Page 64. 

February '83 80 MICRO 

Read the review of our DBASIC for 

FHL Color FLEX! 

March '83 80 MICRO 

FHL Color FLEX will be the 

feature review!!! 



SEE OUR ADS IN 



Color Computer News The Rainbow 



(5 pages) 

REMarkable Software 
P.O. Box 1192 
Muskegon, Ml 49443 
US $21.00 per year 



(5 pages) 

5803 Timberridge Dr. 

P.O. Box 209 

Prospect, KY 40059 

US $16.00 per year 

US $22.00 Canada/Mexico 

US $31.00 Foreign - surface mail 

US $49.00 Foreign • airmail 



System 68 

(2 pages) 
P.O. 310 

Conyers, GA 30207 
US $24.00 per year 



80 Micro 

(1 page) 

80 Pine Street 

Peterborough, NH 03458 

US $25.00 per year 

US $27.97 Canada/Mexico 

US $44.97 Foreign 



68 Micro Journal 

(1 page) 

5900 Cassandra Smith 

P.O. Box 849 

Hixson.TN 37343 

US $24.50 per year 

US $42.50 per 2 years 

US $64.50 per 3 years 




FRANK 

HOGG 

LABORATORY 



THE REGENCY TOWER • SUITE 215 • 770 JAMES ST. • SYRACUSE, NY 1 3203 

PHONE(31 5)474-7856 • TELEX 646740 



Software Review... 

These Two Business 
Programs Offer A Lot 

We read the other day that Radio Shack does not plan to 
come out with a general ledger package for CoCo. Too bad, 
because we believe there are a couple of programs now on 
the market that show that CoCo can be used for this 
purpose — and without a lot to be given away, either. 

In truth, I believe Disk Double Entry (DDE) has most of 
the advantages of my Model II General Ledger program. 
Maybe not every single one, but it is a fine renditionthat will 
make things work quite well. 

On the other hand, Small Business Accounting Package 
(SBAP) is an excellent program that will give you a whole 
range of necessary information you need to keep up to date 
with business finances. It, by the way, is part of a system 
which will be coming available to give all aspects of financial 
needs for a small business when it is complete later this year. 

What's the difference? To our mind, a main one is that 
DDE is more accounting-oriented while SBAP is better 
suited to the businessman who doesn't know his debits from 
his credits. Let's clarify that a bit. A good course in 
bookkeeping or Accounting 101 will more than qualify you 
for DDE. You don't need a CPA to understand it — 
although some knowledge of basic accounting is helpful. 

Both will do a fine job of keeping your books up to date. 
SB A Pis wider in scope in that it has modules for payroll and 
gives aging reports for accounts payable and receivable, but 
DDE has a great deal of depth to it. DDE is a general ledger 
system while SBAP is a "ledgerless" but full-blown system. 
Both, we believe, will fit well into your business (or, even, 
home) needs, depending on the amount of detail and 



Computer Peripheral 
Resources 

8 'A" Disk Drive Power Supplies 



v! 


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££& 2 New Shugart Drives \ 


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• Horizontal — 12x12x3 1 / 2 . .$74.95 




S: 






•Vertical— 7x12x6 $74.95 

•OpenFrame — 7x2x3 w/o-case $59.95 
•Single Horiz. P/S — 

6x12x3V2 $44.95 




ijiji 






•Custom 4' 2-Drive Cable . . , $2100 

• 4-Drive Cable $32.00 

• Dual Case. Horiz. or Vert. 

(w/oP/S) .$24.95 

•Single Case. Horiz. (w/o P/S) , .$18.95 

• Shugart 5Va Disk Drive $204.95 




M 


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SA405 6msT-T.SS. SDorDD 




vi> 


ys- 


Terms: Personal checks allow 14 days. COD. 


■:*:*: 


ivi 


M.D.. Certified Checks Credit Cards add 3% 


$•'. 


:•:•: 


Shipping and Handling S3. 00 West and $6.00 


yy. 


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East states All shipping USP surface other 


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means extra 


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P.O. Box 834, or call... 


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Oak Harbor, WA 9B277 (205) e73--*7 r 97 


ii 







complexity you want and need. 
Here is a look at each: 

Disk Double Entry 

DDE is based heavily on general accounting principles. 
So, if you never figured out the difference between a debit 
and a credit ("debits by the door, credits by the window" we 
were taught — but then all the rooms faced the same way!) 
then it is probably not for you. Custom Software 
Engineering, which sells the program, makes this pretty 
clear in its advertising, advising buyers to have basic 
understanding of double entry bookkeeping (no, that's not 
keeping two sets of books). 

This single comment aside, it is a great program. The 
entry of transactions is easy, the reports can be formatted to 
your own liking, and CoCo "beeps"you if you do something 
wrong. 

The program is capable of handling 300separate accounts 
and about 1400 transactions on a single disk drive. It allows 
you to close out months or quarters, gives year-to-date and 
current period information and prints out the normal 
reports one would expect from a package of this sort — 
balance sheet, trial balance and income statement. One of 
the things we particularly like is an easy method of handling 
dates and of balancing your balance sheet at any time during 
a period. 

Let's explain the latter. In most accounting systems, you 
will always be out of balance on the balance sheet until you 
close out a period (usually a month or quarter). When you 
do, any profit you have made during the period is 
automatically swept into an account which is usually called 
"Year-To-Date Profit and Loss." This account is what 
"balances" your balance sheet. So in the middle of the 
period, you are always out of balance by the amount of 
profit you have made. 

DDE sets up an account it calls "Additional Retained 
Earnings" which lets your balance sheet balance. Handy, 
especially if you need an up-to-date balance sheet and you're 
in the midst of a month. 

But, what makes us especially fond of DDE is the ease in 
which you can enter a transaction. After selecting this 
option, the program automatically numbers the transaction 
for you and then sets the screen for entry. You enter the 
account number to which you wish to post part of the 
transaction, and it prints out the name of the account. You 
then enter whether you want a debit or a credit to that 
account. The program keeps tabs at the bottom of the screen 
as to how much you have entered as a debit and how much to 
a credit. One quick glance lets you know whether you are in 
balance or not. 

But that is not all. Once you have posted an offsetting 
entry, if you are not in balance, the program will not accept 
the entry. A beep warns you. 

You also have the option of printing comments with each 
transaction — which can or cannot be shown on an audit trail 
printout. You may also erase an entry, insert an entry or 
change figures. To be honest, the data entry is very smooth 
and much faster than our General Ledger for the Model II. 

The most difficult part of DDE is getting started. You 
cannot just sit down and start listing out accounts. This has 
some advantages and disadvantages. The advantages are 
that you have the option of formatting the accounts (and 
your financial statements) any way you wish. The 
disadvantage is that it, obviously, takes some time. 

However, once your chart of accounts have been set up 
that does not mean they are cast in stone. You can delete 
accounts (as long as there is no balance in them), add 
accounts and, even, change the type of account. As we said, 
this takes a little while to do, but it is not terribly difficult — 



70 the RAINBOW January, 1983 



IMOVA-PIIMBALL 

AN EXCITING NEW PINBALL SIMULATION FOR THE 
COLOR COMPUTER! WITH ALL THE ACTION THAT S 
MADE IT AN ALL TIME FAVORITE! x=5v $20 



^ 




FEATURES, 



Arcade Action Graphics and Sound 

4 Players 

Live Action Flippers 

Action Bumpers and Thumpers 

Double and Triple Bonus Scores 

Extra Bonus Ball 

Ball Kicker 



§WARS 

0' 



■v 



§° 



.LIKE THE ARCADE! 

ROBOTS ARE INVADING EARTH IN 
WAVE AFTER ADVANCING WAVE! 
Your mission is to destroy all robots and save the 
surviving humans Watch (or the missle firing BRAINS 
and the fatal touch of the HULKS' $18 



ALL 

PROGRAMS 

MACHINE 

LANGUAGE 

■ 

REQUIRE 

16k 



e 



I r °*° 



DERBY 




PAC-MAC 

Great PAC MAN action! $15 



Shoot bugs in format ion, before they swoop down 
to attack you! $9 



®(U7(Jiffl©[LI 



g@(F¥WzS^(l 



Race around tha track with a computer controlled 
car m pursuit Like the arcade, DODGE- EM! $14 



Color Computer Machine Lanov^e 
P.O. Box 25427 

Chicago, il eoeas 



[ARCADE ACTION!) 



H D P P Y 
NEW' 





GUIDE HOPPY SAFELY HOME TO HIS 
DOCK TRAVEL ACROSS A HIGHWAY AND 
HOP ON LOGS & TURTLES TO GET THERE! 
LIKE THE ARCADE! $18 

DEALER. AUTHOR INQUIRIES INVITED 



assuming you know what you want to do with an accounting 
program in the first place. 

We should point out that saying there are 300 possible 
accounts is something of a misnomer. Some of these 
accounts should be used as "headings"and "totar'accounts. 
However, we do not believe a small business could possibly 
use all of the 300 accounts available, anyway. 

There is no accounts receivable module here, nor an 
accounts payable. It would be possible, of course, to use 
some of the accounts for these areas. And, there is some talk 
that Custom might consider another package for these 
functions if necessary. 

But DDE is a fine general ledger package and an 
outstanding buy. If you need a general ledger program and 
have some knowledge of accounting, you will be extremely 
pleased with it. 

Small Business Accounting Package 

What it may lack in detail as compared to the DDE 
program, SBAP makes up for it in breadth. This fine 
offering from Color Software Services has accounts payable 
and receivable, a payroll account module, and sales entry. 
Those very familiar with accounting procedures may find 
some of its features a bit different, but SBAP is really just 
making things easier for the user. 

By way of explaination, when entering sales, SBA P gives 
you the option of breaking down a day's receipts into cash 
sales, credit sales and sales on account (more on this later). If 
you have sales on account, it sends you to the accounts 
receivable section of the program to record the sale(s) made 
on account. 

Yet, the program provides no way to increase a particular 
account balance. It does allow you to record a payment — 
but not an addition to the account. That seems to fly in the 
face of accounting procedures. 

Maybe so. But it is also a very logical way to do business, 
too. Let's just say that John Doe buys $ 1 00 worth of goods 
from you on January 5th. That is easy to handle, you just 
record his purchase with the sales, - go to the receivables 
module and open an account for Mr. Doe, with a balance 
owing of $100. 

But, 10 days later, on January 15th, Mr. Doe is in with 
another order — this one for $200. You have to set up a 
second account for him, this time with a balance of $200. 

Now, if this seems to be strange, remember that Mr. Doe 
will probably pay off the $ 1 00 before he pays off the $200. By 
handling each transaction (order, in this case) separately, 
you know which particular order Mr. Doe is paying off and 
which one is still open. That may not be the way a 
"professional" accountant would do it, but it does make 
excellent sense in the operation of a small business. Since 
your balance sheet will list your total receivables anyway, it 
is probably more important for the small businessman to 
know which outstanding invoice has not been paid usingthis 
method than it is to bundle all transactions to a particular 
individual and company up into one account. 

This is particularly true because SBAP also provides 
some very nice aging reports for both receivables and 
payables. If you shipped merchandise to Mr. Doe on a 30 
day account, and set up the payment date when you entered 
the transaction, the program will automatically show his 
account as being 30 days behind if you have not cleared that 
balance owing by that date. A very nice feature. 

The same aging status is available, by the way, for your 
payables. That way you can keep track of the money that 
you owe. 

Earlier we said we would have more to say about the sales 
entry. This module also allows you to figure in the sales tax 
you will owe and the discount you might have to pay (say for 



credit card sales) as each day's sales are reported. SBA P 
prompts you for this information — which means you have 
the option of entering it or not. We like this very much, as it 
gives a very clear picture of how much actual sales are in a 
given day — and eliminates the necessity of an adjusting 
entry either at the end of the month or on a daily basis. 

SBA P also has a module which allows you to keep track 
of purchase orders. While this is non-interactive with the 
rest of the systems, it is a good way to keep up to date with 
what you have ordered. It is a good "tickler"filefor itemsfor 
which you are awaiting delivery. 

A check register is also available, which prints out your 
checks in numerical order. 

In short, SBAP is just that, a Small Business Accounting 
Package. It has a wealth of features and does not require you 
to have a knowledge of accounting procedures — although it 
will provide you with the standard accounting reports — 
balance sheet and income statement. It allows 400 accounts 
recievable and 400 payable and lets you disburse these 
between some 38 categories. 

Both systems are disk-based. DDE requires 32K while 
SBAP runs in 16K or 32K. It also features a tape backup 
procedure. 

The documentation on both programs isexcellentand the 
lead the user through many more procedures than there is 
space to detail here. Both programs are menu-driven, have 
user error-trapping techniques and are user-friendly. SBA P 
does more prompting than does DDE. 

DDE*s reports are formatted better than are those of 
SBAP. This is natural, of course, since (I) you set up the 
formats yourself (although you can modify SBAP's) and (2) 
the program is geared to operate primarily as a general 
ledger alone. 

As to price: The only word we can say is that both are 
extremely attractive. We have seen packages costing far 
more (for other computers) that do a great deal less. 

Depending on your needs and level of expertise, either 
Small Business Accounting Package or Disk Double Entry 
have to rate as top-flight buys. 

(Small Business Accounting Package, Color Software 
Services, P.O. Box 1708, Dept. R, Greenville, TX 75401, 
$149.95 plus $2.25 s/h; manual alone $20) 
(Disk Double Entry, Custom Software Engineering, 807 
Minuteman Causeway, Cocoa Beach, FL 32931, $44.95 
plus $1 s/h) 



What's A Payable? 

Here are some of the terms 
discussed in this review: 

General Ledger— A system for 
keeping financial books which 
features "offsetting entries," usually 
called double-entry bookkeeping. 

Accounts Payable— A series of 
accounts which shows who you owe. 

Accounts Receivable — A series of 
accounts which shows who owes you. 

Aging Reports— Keeping track of 
receivables and payables according 
to when they should be paid. 

Income Statement— A report that 
shows where money comes from and 
where it went. 

Balance Sheet— A listing of 
liabilities and assets. 



72 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



r 



TAKE A CLOSER LOOK 

THERE'S SOMETHING For EVERYONE 

/ — 



SOFTWARE 

CCM#3 

by Charles Santee, Ed.D, 

This program allows total communication 
for special persons and does this with only 
one joystick. Easy to use, and also recom- 
mended for young children; can help 
teach spelling and sentence structure. Ex- 
cellent documentation. 
32KEXT $32.95 

BIGNUM |£| 

If you dislike seeing numbers like 1 .23045 E 
23, and wish you could have all the ac- 
curate digits instead, then BIGNUM is, for 
you. Add, subtract, multiply, divide and 
raise BIG numbers to BIG powers and get 
totally accurate results. Even if you are 
satisfied with an approximation, without 
this program the Color Computer would 
return an "OV ERROR" with this problem: 
34f 45. BIGNUM returns the entire 68 digit 
result! Accurate to 1,024 digits in 16K & 
about 3,068 digits with 32 RAM. 
16K $9.95 

SKY-DEFENSE €1 

Can you survive the first wave of attack? 
Or the next? Or the next? Only your joy- 
stick will ever know! Features horizontal 
flight in highres graphics, and fast-paced 
action. Machine language; joystick re- 
quired. 16K $18.95 

THE WALL C| 

Here is a 9 color joystick game that isn't 
another "Breakout" but a new idea. You 
are a brick shooting Bricks at the WALL to 
get the brick on the other side! (strange 
plot) This one's unique. Time limit on play. 
Joystick required. 
16K $6.95 



HARDWARE 

AUX-KEY 

by JARB 

(Auxiliary External Keyboard Unit) 
Thisfull size, industrial grade keyboard unit 
is P.C. board mounted for trouble free 
operation and years of use. Mounted in 
an attractive aluminum case with a 19- 
key numeric pad, AUX-KEY comes with 
long cable for remote placement of your 
80C. No soldering required for installa- 
tion. Will not affect normal operation of 
the original keyboard $134.95 

16K-32K UPGRADE KIT 

Kit includes 8 200 ns #4116 Factory Prime 
Chips, piggybacked sockets, SAM socket, 
and "32K" button to replace the 16K on 
your computer's case. Easy to remove. No 
soldering to computer $25.95 

64K RAM CHIPS 

200 ns #4164 chip set will upgrade your 
"E" board easily. Factory Prime Chips. 
(Compare the price elsewhere!). .$69.95 



Nanos Reference Cards 

Model I BASIC & ASSEMBLER $4.96 

Model I BASIC ONLY 2.95 

Model II BASIC & ASSEMBLER 5.95 

Model II SVC 2.95 

Model II Commands & Utilities 3.95 

Model III BASIC & ASSEMBLER 5.95 

Model III BASIC ONLY 3.95 

Color Computer & TDP-100 

Color BASIC & EXTENDED 4.95 

POCKET BASIC 2.95 

APPLE II & II+ BASIC 3.95 

APPLE II & II+ BASIC & 6502 4.95 

Z-80 4.95 



v 



Add $1.50 per software order and $2.00 per hardware order for postage and handling. 
California residents add 67o Sales Tax. 

QUASAR ANIMATIONS 

1520 Pacific Beach Drive, San Diego, California 92109 
(619)274-2202 



Personal Uses... 



You're Invited 



3 



To Use This Handy Program 



By Bob Dooman 




This program uses the printer to produce somethingquite 
practical — a birthday party invitation in its own mailer! 

The invitation will print out on 8/2 X 1 1 paper likea letter. 
You'll fold it so the name and addresses of the person youVe 
inviting is on the outside, so no envelope is needed. 

Let's look at the listing. The REM's in 9 to 12 tellyou the 
CHR$ codes are for an Okidata Micro-80. You may haveto 
change those to suit your printer. 

Lines 30 to 50 ask for the name and age of the birthday 
child. That's because 1 have four. You can change that to a 
constant, but the child will probably like it better keying in 
his own name. 

Lines 70 to 130 prompt for date, time, etc. A word of 
caution, remember our 80C treats commas(,) orcolons (:) as 
delimiters in input data. In other words, anything after the 
comma wouldn't print. 1 found spaces between entries work 
fine. Example: Niles 1L 60648. Of course, if you have 
Extended Color Basic, you can change the INPUT 
commands to LINE INPUT. LINE INPUT does accept 
commas, etc. 

The input up to addressee is keyed in just once. Only the 
name and address of each person invited changes. So after 
each invitation is printed, line 340 does to 130 for the next 
name and address. 

My four-year-old got a kick out of keying in things 
himself. So the program is fun, as well as educational and 
practical. Have a good party! 

1 * * ir- * w *• *■*-***••***■**■******■*•*- * * #• * 

2 * BIRTHDAY PARTY * 

3 ' INVITATION 

4 ' BY 

5 ? BOB DOOMAN 

6 ? GLEN VIEW. IL * 

7 " C. OCT 1982 * 
B ? *•#************ ****-** * * * * * # -*- 

9 "80C WITH OKIDATA MICRO 80 * 

10 'PRINTER CODE (10) @ 170,220, 
230,330,350, = LINE FEED 

11 'CODE (31) <s! 180 = WIDE CHARA 
CTERS FOR ENV ADDRESS 



^ 



CHAR PER INCH 
13 ' *************************** 
20 CLS: PR I NT" THIS WILL MAKE YOUR 
" : PR I NT " B I RTHD AY I NV I TAT I ONS " : PR 

int:print m give me the INFORMATIO 
n":print"i need m :for x =1 to 900 
:nextx:cls 

30 PR I NT "DO NOT USE COMMAS < , >" : 

INPUT" WHAT'S YOUR NAME";N$ 

40 PRINT 

50 INPUT "HOW OLD WILL YOU BE M ;A 

60 PRINT 

7* INPUT"DATE OF PARTY" ; D* 

80 PRINT 

90 input"time m ;t* 

100 PRINT 

110 INPUT "PLACE"; PS 

120 PRINT 

130 CLS: PR I NT "OK, I GOT 

. ":print:print m now ? who 

ED?": PRINT: INPUT "FIRST NAME" ;F*: 

print: input m last name";l* 
140 if f$=-~" " then 20 else 150 

150 PRINT: INPUT"THEIR ADDRESS" ; A 

160 PRINT: INPUT" CITY ST ZIP" ; C$ 
170 FOR 3=0 TO 8:PRINT#~2,CHR*(1 

0) :next j 

130 print#-2,chr$(31 ) :print#-2,t 

AB C10)F$; " ";L* 

190 PRINT#~2,TAB<10) ; A* 

PRINT#-2,TAB(10)C* 

PRINT#-2,CHR* (30) 

FOR J=0 TO 14:PRINT#-2,CHR$< 

NEXT J 

PRINT* -2, TAB (5) "HI, "F*'V':P 
CHR*(10) :PRINT#-2,CHR*( 1 



ALL THAT 
IS INVIT 



200 
210 
220 
10) : 
230 

rint#-: 

0) 
240 

be 
250 
260 

to 
270 
2B0 



to 



TAB (10) "DATE ";D*: 



";T$; 



;p$: 



12 'CODE (30) @ 210 



RESUME 10 



PRINT#-2 5 TAB(5) " I'm going 

"A" years old !!!!!" 

GOSUB 350 

FRINT#--2«TAB(5) "Can you come? 

my BIRTHHAY PARTY ?" 

GOSUB 350 

PF«NT#- 
GOSUB350 
290 PRINT#- 
GOSUB 350 
500 PR I NT # 
GOSUB 350 

510 PRINT#-2* TAB (5) "Please call 
my Mom to let her Know: [INSERT Y 
OUR PHONE NOD": GOSUB 350 
320 PRINT# -2,TAB<5)N* 
5^0 FOR J=0 TO 16:PRINT#~2,CHR$( 
10) :NEXT J 
340 GOTO 130 

350 PRINT#-~2,CHR$(10) :PRINT#~2,C 
HR*(10) : RETURN 
360 END 



2,TAB(10) "TIME 
-2, TAB (10) "PLACE 



74 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



RAINBOW CONNECTION SOFTWARE pr«»«nta . . . 



i%\*!?t 9 




5 aoundsational, colorful, graphic gajoies for your Color Computer including: 
Brickout, B-17 Boaber, Blackjaok, Jackpot and Coaiputration - all for tba 
price you might expect to pay for just one of theee games J ! I 
Plue added bonue - Compuaindi gueee the computer'e secret code from cluee 
provided - a game of logic for the whole family. At this price can your 
library afford to be without them? 

All machines - Ext. Baeic NOT Required 
819.95 Cassette - 82I+.95 Disk 



RAINBOW CONNECTION SOTTWAHE presents... 



as^u 



g 




The year is 2117 and the galaxy has been invaded by the Xoprith,! 

a race of robots from a distant galaxy. Your mission is to rid the ^ 

galaxy of their various ships a quadrant at a time but fuel is precious. 

Just as it seams you're winning the battle they hit you with the ultima! 

weapon - phycological warfare! Hi-res, real time, arcade sound. 

16K Ext. Basic & Joystick 
81^.95 Cass - 819.95 Disk 



RAINBOW CONNECTION SOFTWARE presents... 

KZJX0HA 










HAIKBDW COHITEHTIQSf SOFTWARE j*i 



— XZJSGSA 



You've traversed the dungeons of Kzirgla and reclaimed the almighty Scepter. 
Now you must use its invincible powers and all your weapons to slay a myriad 
of monsters and fireballs in your attempt to destroy the evil wizard. If you 
like the challenge and mystique but not the boredom of text only adventure 
games then this real time, hi-ree sequel to the ever popular Scepter of Kzirgla 
is for youl 

16K Ext Basic Cass - 821.95 
CONQUEST OF KZIRGLA for the Color Computer 32K Diskette - 826.95 




At last. ..a real-time fcraphics 
If you are bored with silent sc 
adventure games then SCEPTER OF KZIRGLA is for you 

aafaaaaaaV MaaaaaV 



Include (2.00 ahippijig. 
Minn, T-tccdentB add 5* la*. 
D«nl»r inquiries invited* 

Not »miitV*d with THE RAINBOW, 



•Reviewed in the RAINBOW 
re gome with arcade sound for your Color Computer! 
f text but enjoy the challenge and complexity of 




16K Ext, 
816.95 < 



RAINBOW CONNECTION SOFTWARE 
351'* 6th Place N.W. 
Rochester, KN 55901 



Hardware... 

The Serial/ Parallel Syndrome: 
What's That? 

By Sue Searby 

Okay, so the RS232 interface. Then you can connect the 
parallel printer to the serial port with the PK80C (parallel- 
to-serial interface converter.) 

Jibberish? Asking why all these gyrations? Or at least, 
what do all of these terms refer to? Let's keep it simple, Sue! 
(Techy types, don't be offended by the lack of detailed 
accuracy. It is the basic concepts we are after!) 

When a device is connected to a computer there must be 
some method for electronically passing information back 
and forth. Two common methods are affectionately referred 
to as "parallel" and "serial." ("Serial" meaning the same as 
"RS232" here.) 

Let's say that a single character of information is 
represented by eight bits; i.e., the printer needs to collect a 
group of eight bits together to determine the character being 
sent by the computer. Now look at the diagram. The vertical 
bars between the computer connection and the printer 
connection mark off units of time. The round dots show a 
single bit being sent. 

The serial method sends one bit at a time; one right after 
another. The printer must then collect eight bits before it can 
put together a character to print, waiting eight units of time 
to receive a single letter. 

On the other hand, the parallel interface method sends 
eight bits all together at one time; i.e., eight bits are sent in 
parallel. Therefore, the printer receives a whole eight bits 



(one letter) each unit of time. 

As you can see, a printer whose interface is electronically 
wired for receiving serial information could not understand 
a parallel signal from a computer and vice versa. These are 
simply two different methods of passing information from 
the computer to the printer — "serial" (one bit at a time), or 
parallel (a group at a time). 

One last point of confusion. You may come across a 
printer with a parallel interface that is called a "serial" 
printer. This "serial" printer is one that prints out one 
character at a time — as opposed to a "line" printer that 
prints the entire line at once (used on larger computer 
systems). 

Now, don't let the "serial/parallel" syndrome get you 
down again! 



Input Output Methods Illustrated 
PARAl LEI 



Compute 
Connectc 



Computer 
Connector 



t 



-^ 



-* ■ > 



i— ^ 



= = 



t- 



Print 
i Connectc 





ELECTRICITY 
CONSUMPTION 
MONITER ... 

16 or 32k extended basic required 

did your coco help save your money today? it could have with with "ecm", an easy 
and entertaining to use household electricity consumption moniter for trs-80c*. 
the sixteen page manual explains each step in full detail with plenty of examples, 
ecm can show your daily usage in dollars or kilowatt hours for the last thirty 
days with average, high and low days. it can graph the last sixty days in kwh 
with average indicator, predict your next bill anytime during the month with 
surprising accuracy and more! helping you manage your electrical consumption is 
a job your home computer sh0uld~be doing ! the introductory" price of $8,35 
Includes a professional manual, cassette tape, and 'neat 1 program listing, 
printer is not required. special price effective thru march 1, 1983 only, a 
savings of 1.50 off the regular price! full refund if not completely satisfied ! 

□ Send me "ECM"! ($9.70 » 8.95 + 75* S&H) MAIL TO : CoCoDATA Enterprises 

1215 Emeralda Drive 
] Information! (Tell me more about ECM) Orlando, Fla. 32808 



76 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



new* 



s e* ( - 



we* 1 - 



nt* 1 - 



fuh». 



BEST- 



*0* 1 - 



^ 



sM 6 - 



> ROML — ROM PAK Loader 

• Save your ROM PAKs (or ANY machine language program) on disk then load and execute with ROML. 

- You no longer need to remove your disk controller to execute your ROM PAK software! 

■ Also allows you to load from disk or tape and execute all machine language programs which are incompatible with 
the disk system! 

- Includes a utility to copy non-protected tapes to disk. 

- Note— ROM PAK execution requires good 64K RAM system. 

- Copy of article included describing how to access 64K RAM. 

Tape: $25.00 Disk: $29.00 

> PLUS32 

- Unleash the hidden 32K RAM in your 64K system. 

- Runs ROM BASIC from RAM where you can modify it! 

- Will not crash system if upper 32K is defective or not available. 

- Note— Requires good 64K RAM system. 
Tape: $15.00 Disk: $19.00 

> ROMKIL — BASIC ROM disable routine 

- Your choice: 

- Disables DISK BASIC ROM — returning your system to EXTENDED BASIC, or 

- Disables EXTENDED BASIC ROM— returning your system COLOR BASIC. 

- Frees up extra RAM. 

- System stays in the level of BASIC you select even if you press the Reset switch. 

• Turning power off and on returns system to original configuration. 

- Allows disk-incompatible machine language programs to be loaded and executed from tape without removing the 
disk controller. 

Tape: $15.00 Disk: $19.00 

> BANNER 

- Make your TV a moving Marquee with Color BANNER! 

- Enter any message and have it move across the screen in GIANT letters in the colors of your choice. 

- Control speed, delay and pause from within your message! 

- Great for parties and exhibitions! 
Tape: $19.00 Disk: $23.00 

> PAC ATTACK — from Computerware 

- The most popular game for the Color Computer! 

■ Fast action and brilliant colors! 

- All the fun of the Arcade without the quarters! 
Tape: $24.95 

> Nelson's SUPER "COLOR" WRITER II 

• By far the BEST word processor available forthe Color Computer! 

- More Features than any other. 
-Supports ANY line printer! 

- Excellent quality documentation! 
ROM PAK: $74.95 Disk: $99.95 

* LCA-47 — Lower Case Adapter 

- Provides real lowercase letters with true descenders! 

- Compatible with ALL Color Computer Software! 

- Provides bright characters on a dark background! 

• Superb User's Manual included. 

- Easy 5 minute installation! 

- Uses NO system memory! 

- 1 year warranty. 

- Hundreds of owners, all happy! 

Assembled and Tested: $75.00 

> SPECIAL — Save $25.00 when you purchase Super "Color" Writer II and an LCA-47 at the 
same time! Order NOW! 

> PP-16 — EPROM Programmer 

- Programs single supply 2516, 2716, and 2758 EPROMs. 

- Program— entire or partial. Auto verify after programming. 

- Transfer contents to RAM formodifying or duplicating. 

- Select Documentation for: Interface to: 

6502 6820 PIA or 6522 VIA 

6800 6820 PIA 

6809 6820 PIA 

8080/8085/Z80 8255 PPI 

-Comprehensivedocumentation booklet contains schematic, instructions for construction, check-out and use, and a 
well commented assembly listing for the specified MPU. 

- Note— User must supply the specified parallel interface. 

- Specify MPU and computer system when ordering. 

Complete Kit (includes ZIF socket): $45.00 
PC board only (with documentation): $25.00 

• ----- ■ Micro Technical Products, Inc. 

===_=== = = = = = 1 23 N Sirrine _ Su j te 1 06 _ A _. 

Mesa, AZ 85201 '""* 

II 1 1 II " Phone: (602) 834-0283 

Add 5% for shipping. Overseas add 10%. Arizona residents 
= = INC add 5% tax. MasterCard & Visa welcome. 



Hardware. . . 

High Speed POKE Has 
Effect On CoCo Hardware 

By Tony DiStefano 
Rainbow Hardware Columnist 

This is the first of a series of articles that will deal with the 
'insides' of your Color Computer. Every month I will 
explore and explain different parts of the Radio Shack 
Color Computer hardware; its limitations, what it can do, 
what it cannot do, and how to improve it. In general, just 
digging into your computer and learning about the 
hardware that all that great software runs on. 

In my first article I would like to clear up a controversy 
that has cropped up concerning the so-called high speed 
computer. As most people know, POKE 65495,0 speeds up 
Basic programs by about 65%. But why does it work on 
some computers and not on others? Also, why does it not 
work with most disk systems? There is also the POKE 
65497,0. That seems to do some strange things on the screen. 
What does that do and why? Well, Here's the story! 

All timings in the computer are derived from a 14.31818 
mhz crystal. This frequency is the clock input to the 6883 
(SAM) chip. When you power up, the Basic power up 
routine sets the SAM to divide the crystal frequency by 16, 
making the 6809E ( MPU) frequency of .894 mhz clock rate. 
A write to SFFD7 ("$" denotes hex number) or POKE 
65495,0 sets the SAM into what is known as the A.D. 
(Address Dependent) rate. This means that the MPU will 
work at one of two speeds .894 mhz or 1.788 mhz clock rates. 
This rate depends upon where the MPU is addressing. 



jjfyAft 



TRS-80 COLOR BASIC 

by BOB ALBRECHT 

This entertaining self-instructional book is packed with 
games, experiments, scores of intriguing challenges, and 
activities related to fantasy role-playing games. The 
ideal introductory aid for kids, parents and teachers 
using the Color Computer. 



m 



John Wiley & Sons 

605Third Ave., New York, NY 10158 



$9.95 



TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER GRAPHICS 

by DON IN MAN LtfiJtm&M^ J 



{$m& 



Explore the creative and imaginative blending of computers 
and color. This exciting book will enable you to explore 
all the graphics capabilities of Extended Color BASIC. 



Reston Publishing Company 

1 1480 Sunset Hills Rd., Reston, VA 22090 



$14.95 



/fcW^ 



ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE GRAPHICS 

FOR THE TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER 

by DON INMAN and KURT INMAN 

This book is specific to the TRS-80 Color Computer with 
applications using sound and graphics to illustrate how an 
assembler can be used to perform feats that would be quite 
difficult, if not impossible in the BASIC language. 

Reston Publishing Company $14.95 



DYMAX, P.O. 310, MENLO PARK,CA 94025 

Dymax orders must be prepaid via check, money order, Visa 
or Mastercard. Sorry, no Purchase Orders or COD orders. 
Please add $2.00 shipping and handling. California residents 
add 6% sales tax. 



^ 



That's right! The SAM will switch between fast and slow 
clock rates depending where it is addressing memory. If the 
MPU is addressing memory between locationsOand S7FFF 
(reading or writing) it will run at the slow clock rate. This 
area is usually RAM. That is 32K of RAM. When it 
addresses memory between $8000 and SFEFF it will run at 
the fast clock rate. This area of memory is usually occupied 
by Extended Basic, Basic, and DOS ROMS. I say usually 
because in another SAM mode this area could be RAM 
also. In the I/O {input I out put) area, any addressing done 
between SFF00 and SFF1F is at slow clock speed. The rest 
of the I/O area between SFF20 and SFFFF is at fast speed. 
This means that only one of the PI As go to high speed, and 
not both, like many people think. The PIA that does go to 
high speed is the one that does the D to A conversions and 
the VDG controls. 

What does all this mean to you? Well, you can use this 
information to find out why your computer doesn't work at 
the dual or high speed. We'll start with the easiest and least 
expensive ways. First, if you have a disk drive, disconnect it 
and try to get the computer to work without it. If the high 
speed doesn't work without the drive plugged in you will 
have to open the computer. Turn the computer off before 
opening it. (P.S. Refer to your service manual for 
instructions before you attempt to open yourcomputer. Oh! 
By the way, you may void your warranty by openingup the 
computer.) Now, remove the RF shield and locate the two 
capacitors labeled C73 and C75. These two capacitors along 
with resistors R73 and R74 make up a RF suppression 
circuit in the main clock circuit. This, unfortunately, distorts 
the square waveshape of the E and Q clock signals. This may 
prevent the system from working at the higher speed. OK, 
now make sure the compuer is off, and remember to make 
sure it's off before you do any modification. 

Cut one side of both of these capacitors. Why only one 
side? Because you may want to resolder it if it has no effect 
on the high speed after you cut it. After all, it is a part of the 
RF suppression circuit. Turn the computer on and try the 
high speed. If it works, great; if not, you will have to 
continue. The next step is to check the PIAs. Since only one 
of the PIAs goes to high speed, the D to A and the VDG 
control one, try changing the PIAs around. The chance that 
both will not work at high speed is rare. If the other one 
works then you are on your way. If not, well, you will have to 
go one step further. At this point you may have to change 
some ICs. If you can, borrow rather than buy one two-mzh 
PIA(MC68B21)andonetwo-mzhMPU(MC68B09E)IC, 
because if after you have changed these two parts you may 
still be out of luck. Replace the MPU and the PIA with 
faster ones. Now it should work at the higher speed. If not, 
the only other components that you can change then are the 
Basic and Extended Basic ICs themselves. 

With your computer working at high speeds it's time to try 
it with your Disk drive. What! It still doesn't work? Don't 
despair; I have another trick up my sleeve. There is one more 
capacitor to cut, it is labeled C85. This capacitor has the 
same purpose as the other two — RF suppression. Try the 
high speed with the Disk controller in. WOW! It works. But, 
if itshould happen that your computer still doesn't work, the 
DOS ROM may not be fast enough. 

Chances are your system will now work at the higher 
speed. If you still have problems after cutting these three 
capacitors and changing the PIA and MPU (which is very 
unlikely), there is not much more that you can do. Now that 
POKE65495,0 works, what about POKE 65491 fit This is a 
mode in which the SAM will run at the high speed 
throughout the whole 64K of memory. Everything is in high 
speed, ROM, RAM, and all 1/ O. The reason that the screen 
goes haywire is that at that speed the SAM chip does not 



78 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



VODKIO BASF-DPS 

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Call: 213/710-1430 

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°m d J, r to OW VORKlOComputerwore 

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Each cassette includes two YORK 10 labels only. Boxes are sold separately. 
Shipments are by U.P.S. unless Parcel Post requested. Boxes, caddies, and 
blank labels are free of shipping charges when ordered with cassettes. When 
ordered without cassettes, shipping charges: Boxes— $1.00/doz., Caddies 
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□ CHECK HERE FOR QUANTITY DISCOUNTS PRICE LIST 



have time to latch in the video, therefore the garbage on the 
screen. But if your RAM is fast enough, the computer can 
still work, even though the display makes you think 
otherwise. Here is a short test program to see if yours will 
work: 

10 POKE 65497,0 

20 FOR I = I to 500: NEXT I 

30 POKE 65496,0 

If this program comes back with OK on the screen, then 
your computer works at the DOUBLE SPEED. You can use 
this mode whenever there are a lot of calculations to do and 
there is no need for the video screen. Sound and keyboard 
functions should work OK, but do not try to do I/O in this 
mode. If it does not work, but works at the High Speed, then 
all you need is faster RAM. If you are using 41 16 or 4164 
chips make sure they are 150 nano seconds or faster. Well, 
that is all for now. Good luck with high speed. I'll see you 
next month. /^ 



Ham Radio... 



Hint , 



Painting Must Be Accurate 



When you issue a PAINT command, be sure that you set 
the point at which the PAINTing is to begin within the area 
that is to be PAINTed. If you set the position on a line which 
encloses the area, the PAINT will not work. 

Also, when using PAINT, be sure that your area is fully 
enclosed, or the PAINT will leak out and cover the entire 
screen. 



Y-PAK Dual Slot Expander 
for Radio Shacks Color Computer 

Have your Disk and Cartridge too! 

Select between 2 Cartridge slots with one 

switch and control the Auto Start with 

the other switch 

$70.°-° Complete 

USER-PAK for Color Computer 

Your own RAM /EPROM Car t r idqe 

Cartridge holds two 2732s, or any combination 

of four 2716s/61l6s 

$30. °LP (ess RAM/f.PROM 

$90.O-° with 8K RAM 

EPROMs burned from your CC cassette. 
Write for details. 

B. Erickson 

RO.Box 110 99 Dei> I. RR 
Chicago, IL. 60811 




Among The "Super' 
This One's "Duper' 

By Burton R. Witham, Jr. 

After I had the automated log, "Logsheet" (the Rainbow- 
December '82), I perceived the need for a program to detect 
duplicate contacts during a contest. Not that I operate many 
contests these days, since I acquired my color computer! But 
one never knows, so I went to it to provide the program. 

The program itself is straight forward, with cues for input 
at each step. Essentially it accepts a station callsign — allows 
the operator to choose to dupe check or not, then to log the 
contact or not. If the logging is opted, the cues then call for a 
minimum of information for contest reporting. The final 
contest log will show: CONTACT NUMBER, STATION 
CALL, DATE, TIME, FREQUENCY, and NOTES (for 
NAME/SIGNATURE, REPORTS, ETC.) 

If a contact is found, and is a duplicate, the program 
indicates when and on what band the contact was worked, 
so that if the operator wishes, and contest rules permit, the 
station can be worked again. 

Some of the features of the program are: to permit 
duplicate contacts on demand (as stated above), a "ZZ" 
feature to end data input phase, and a "**" command to 
screen the last 15 contacts made. After the contest is over, a 
copy of the log can be printed out to submit as a contest log 
(just sign it, and mail it). Of course, the information 
contained and the printout format can be changed to meet 
the needs of any particular contest rules. 

The tape file was used for logging since the file was to be 
sequential, and with the short data input segments, the 
program returns to the input phase very quickly after data 
save. Again, if disk is desired, the modification of lines 140, 
320, 330, 350, 400, 440, 460, 530 and 570 should be made. 

All in all, this program satisfies my need for a contest 
logger/ duper. As written it uses about 4K of memory. 

The listing: 



i 


7 # ¥.- * # # # * * *■ *- •*• * 


1 1 


? k HAM RADIO 


12 


y * CONTEST 


13 


7 * DUPER 


14 


? * BY; W4CNZ 


15 


? * B.B. WITHAM 


16 


7 * 3501 


17 


' *SEA GULL RD 


18 


? * VIRGINIA 


19 


'* BEACH „ VA. 


20 


? * 23452 


21 


- *804-3402623 


.c .c 


y * ALL RIGHTS 


*"\~T 


? * RESERVED 


24 


7 ** K *** * ***■* ¥ 




" * HEADER 


1 0C 


'■ DIME (300) , T< 


0) : 


XX -63 



-J 



^^ 



00) =, F <3;^>> 



80 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



110 CLS3:FORX=1024 TO 1055: POKE X, 

xx:pokex+480, xx:nextx:forx=1024 

T01535STEP32:P0KEX, XX : POKEX-1 , XX 
:NEXTX:PRINT@170 !e " D U P E R "; 
120 FORTM=l TO1000:NEXTTM:SOUND2 
30,2:PRINT©388, " BY: BURT WITHAM 

-W4CNZ "; :PRINT©422, " VIRGINIA 
BEACH, VA. " ; :PRINT©458, " HIT ENT 
ER M ;:FQRTM^1 TO 1000: NEXT: SOUND 1 
80, 1 

130 &*=INKEY*: IFA$OCHR$<13> THE 
N130 

M0 CLS: SOUND 180, l: PR IN 1833- "PR I 
OR TO START OF CONTEST HAVE NEW 

TAPE IN RECORDER AND PRESS <PL 

AY> AND < RECORD > BUTTONS. " : PRINT 

" UNLESS YOU HAVE AN OLD TAPE TO 

LOAD JUST PRESS < PLAY >. M : PRINT 

8484, "PRESS < ENTER > WHEN READY." 

1 50 I K$ = I NKEY* : I F I !<$= ts u THEN 1 50 
160 IF IK*=CHR*C13) THEN170 ELSE 
140 

165 ? * SELECT PSM 

170 SOUND230,2:CL3:PRINT@33, "FOR 
CONTEST LOG HIT <1> FOR 



LOG RELOAD/PRINT HIT<2) TO 
EXIT PROGRAM HIT (3) " : PRINTS449, 
"CALL-'ZZ* ENDS ENTRY MODE 

CALL- 7 ** 7 SCREENS 15 CONTACTS.' 



■" " THEN 180 
GOTO 200,400, 



180 K$=INKEY$: IFK*= 

190 K=VAL(K$> :ON K 

580 

200 SOUND230 , 2 : CLS : CLE AR900 : G= 1 3 

6:H=137:N=0 

205 7 * INPUT DATA 

210 FORX-1 TO300 

220 PRINT® 19, "LOG#: "5 : PR I NTUS I NG 

" **#### • " ; X : PR I NT864 , " CALL- " : PR I 

NTQ449, "CALL-' ZZ> ENDS ENTRY MOD 

E CALL- 7 ** 7 SCREENS 15 CON 

TACTS " ; 

230 POKES . 4 : POKEH , 69 : L I HE. I NPUTC* 

(X) : IFCSCX) =" ZZ" THEN330 

240 IFC*(X>="**" THEN600 

CLS:PRINT@166., "DUPE CHECK Y/ 



250 
N" ; 

260 
270 

280 
290 



DC$= I NKE Y* : I FDC$ = ,: " THEN260 
.IFDC$= u Y n THEN360 
PRINTS 198. "LOG IT Y/N- " 5 
LG*=INKEY*: IFLG$=" "THEN290 



EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE 
For the Color Computer 



TOM MIX SOFTWARE 



3424 College N.E. 
Grand Rapids, Ml 49505 
(616)364-4791 



CLOCK-With the ever increasing use of digital clocks, more and more 
young people are unpracticed in the use of the "ANALOG" clocks. You 
remember those, the ones with the hands. This program will attempt to 
teach the relationship between the two types of clocks. 

REQUIRES 16K EXT. BASIC $14.95 

SPELLING TEST is designed to give a standard oral spelling test using 
the audio track of the computer's tape recorder to dictate test words and 
sample sentences. Student responses are typed on the keyboard and 
checked by the computer. Results are displayed on the screen and (if 
connected) on a printer. REQUIRES 16K EXT. BASIC $19.95 

MATH DRILL is a program designed to help children to practice addi- 
tion, subtraction, multiplication, and division skills on the COLOR COM- 
PUTER. It has several features that make its use particularly attractive. 

•Up to 6 students may use the program at the same time. 

•Answers for addition, subtraction and multiplication are entered 
from right to left, just as they are written on paper. 

•Commas may be included in the answers. 

•Partial products for the multiplication problems may be com- 
puted on the screen. 

•Division answers that have a remainder are entered as a whole 
number followed by the letter "R" and the remainder. 

•There are ten, user modifiable, skill levels. 

•A "SMILEY FACE" is used for motivation and reward. Its size in- 
creases relative to the skill level. 

•Skill levels automatically adjust to the student's ability. 

•A timer measures the time used to answer each problem and the 
total time used for a series of problems. 

•After a problem has been answered incorrectly the correct answer 
appears under (above in division) the incorrect answer. 

REQUIRES 16K EXT BASIC $19.95 

WORD DRILL is designed to give a multiple choice vocabulary quiz. 
Words and definitions are entered into the program from the keyboard or 
from a tape file. The computer displays a randomly chosen definition 
and eight word choices. The student must enter his response before a 
built in timer reaches zero. 

REQUIRES 16K EXT. BASIC $19.95 



EDUCATIONAL PACKAGE - SPELLING TEST - 
WORD DRILL — MATH DRILL — ESTIMATE - 
ALL FOR — $69.95 



ESTIMATE is a program designed to help children to practice estimating 
the answers to addition, subtraction, multiplication and division 
problems on the COLOR COMPUTER. It has many features that make its 
use particularly attractive: 

•Up to 5 students may use the program at the same time. 
•There are 5, user modifiable, skill levels. 

•The acceptable percent error may be changed as a student's skill 
improves. 
•A timer measures the number of seconds used to answer each 
problem and the total time used for a series of problems. 
•If a problem has been answered incorrectly, the student is told the 
percent error and asked to try again. 

•If a problem is answered incorrectly a second time, the student is 
told the correct answer and the range of acceptable answers is 
displayed. 

•A report is given at the end of each set of problems that includes the 
number of problems done, the number of problems answered cor- 
rectly on the first try and the average percent error. 
•The (BREAK) key has been disabled so that a child will not in- 
advertently stop the program from running. 

16K EXT. BASIC $19.95 

TEACHERS' DATABASE is a program designed to allow a teacher to 
keep a computerized file of information about his/her students. There 
are many features that make this program particularly attractive. 

• Information on as many as 100 students (or more) may be in the 
computer at one time. 

• Each student may have as many as 20 (or more) individual 
items of data in his/her record. 

• The program will run from cassette or disk. 

• Cassette and disk files are completely compatable. 

• The program is menu driven. 

• Records may be easily changed, deleted, combined or 
added. 

• Information about students may be numerical or text. 

• Records may be quickly alphabetized. 

• Records may be sorted by various criteria. 

• Records may be reordered (ranked) based on test scores or 
other data. 

• Data displayed during a sort may be printed on a printer or 
saved on disk or cassette as a new file. 

• A full statistical analysis of data may be done and sent to the 
printer. 

• Student test scores may be weighted. 

32K EXT BASIC TAPE $39.95 DISC $42.95 



• ADD $1.00 POSTAGE & HANDLING • TOP ROYALTIES PAID • 
MICHIGAN RESIDENTS ADD 4% SALES TAX • LOOKING FOR NEW SOFTWARE 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 81 



300 IFLG*<>"Y" thencls:n=n+1:nex 
TX 

310 cls:printhi9, h log#: "; iprintu 
sing h **####. " ; x:print£64, "call-" 
;c$ (X) :print@78, "time-" :pokeh„ 83 

:LINEINPUTT* (X) :PRINT@96, "FREQ-" 

: PR I NT© 107, "NOTES-" IPOKEH, 101: LI 

NEINPUTF* (X) : PR I NT© 107, "NOTES-": 

POKEH, 1 13:LINEINPUTN*(X> : IFX>1 T 

HEN GOTO330 

315 '* SAVE DATA 

320 0PEN"0%#-1, "CONTEST" 

330 PR I NT#- 1,C$(X),T$(X),F$(X),M 

*(X) 

340 IPC* <X>="**" THEN600 ELSEIFC 

$(X)="2Z" THEN350 ELSE N=N+1 : CLS 

:nextx 

350 CLOSE#-l: GOTO 170 

355 7 * DUPE CHCK 

360 FORN=l TOX-i 

370 IFC$(X>=C*(N> THEN 390 ELSE 

NEXTN 

380 SOUND230,2:PRINT@166, "NOT A 

DUPE" : FORTH- 1 TO500: NEXTTM: G0T02 

30 

590 PRINTS 166. "DUPE! ! " : 3QUND50. 6 

:PRINT@64, n CALL- ,! ;C$<N) :PRINT©78 

, "TIME-" ;T*(N) :PRINT@96, "FRED- 11 ; 

F$(N> :FORTN=l TOl 600: NEXTTM: CLS: 

N^N-1 IGOTO220 







CGP1PUTER PROGRAMS 

TRS-90 MODEL 1/3 I 6K LEVEL II 

TRS-8e 16K COLOR 

*3 FROG RACE S3 
DEMO PROGRAM FROG RACE COMES ON CASSETTE WITH A 
REFUND COUPON TO USE ON YOUR NEXT ORDER. 
FROG RACE CASSETTE S3. WITH CATALOG 



DUO-PAKS ARE 



fl0 EACH. 



PROGRAM SIDE 1 

GONE FISHING 

CRAPS 

STARSHIP 

TRNK ATTACK 

NUMBER GUESS 

IN-BETWEEN 

SAFARI 

MORTAR BATTLE 

TEASERS 

PT BOAT 

CHEK-CHES 

THINK 

TREASURE ISLAND 
DUO-PAK-300 DC-OHMS LAW 
DUO-PAK-301 IC-TIMER-1 
******************************* 
SYSTEM PROGRAMS 



PAK NO. 

OUO-PRK-1 

DUO-PAK-2 

DUO-PAK-3 

DUO-PAK-4 

DUO-PAK-3 

DUO-PAK-6 

DUO-PAK-7 

DUO-PAK-B 

DUO-PAK-9 

DUO-PAK-10 

DUO-PAK-11 

DUO-PflK-12 

DUO-PAK-13 



PROGRAM SIDE 2 
CONCENTRATION 
SLOT-MACHINE 
SHERLOCK HOLMES 
ASSOCIATION 
DICE ROLL 
SHELL GAME 
STARSHIP-2 
PUZZLE 
MOUSE 

TURTLE RACE 
STARSHIP-3 
LUCK I LOGIC 
RESCUE 
FLC-FRC 
IC-TIMER 2 
**************** 
*10 EACH 



SU1 CASSETTE COPY • CASSETTE COPY 

***x*x**x**********x***x**********x**x********* 

ORDERS WILL BE SENT BY FIRST CLASS MAIL PPD. 

SORRY NO COD'S 

9E SURE TO SPECIFY UHICH COMPUTER YOU HAVE. 

B. ERICKSON P.O. BOX 11099 

CHICAGO, IL. 60611 



395 

400 

410 

T 1, 

420 

425 

430 

440 



? * LOAD TAPE 

CLS: OPEN" I " , #-1 , "CONTEST" 

PRINT@33 5 "REVIEW OR PRINT OU 

,2";r$ 

R$=INKEY*I IFR*="" THEN420 
? * REVIEW 

ifr$«" 1" then440 else 500 
forv=l ton: lineinput#-1 „ c* (v 
) :lineinput#-i „t*<v) :lineinput#- 
i,f$(v) :lineinput#-1 ,n$ (v) 
450 print'532, "call-";c$ (v) ; " tim 
e-";t*<v> ; " freq-";f$ (V) : print" n 
otes-";n$ (v) :print£486, "next cal 
l < enter:;"; 

460 IF EOF(-l) THENCLOSE#-l:GOTQ 

490 

470 IK*=INKEY$: IFIK$=" " THEN470 

430 IFIK*«CHR*<13) THENNEXTV: GOT 

0440 

4 90 FORTH- i TO 1600: NEXTTM: GOTO 17 



495 7 * PRINT FILE 

500 CL6:PRINT@161, "PRINTER READY 

HIT <. ENTER >"; 
510 R$=INKEY$: IFR*^ :,M THEN510 
520 IFR*=CHR$<13> THEN530 
530 F0RV=1 T0N:LINEINPUT#-1,C*<V 

) :line:input#-i,t* <v> :lineinput#~ 
1,f* (v) : lineinput#-1,n$ (v) 
540 print#--2, "call-"?c$ (v) 5 tab < 1 
8) "time-"; t$ (v) ; tab (32) "freq~";f 

t (V) : TAB (50) "NOTES-"; N* <V) 







560 
570 
190 
510 
590 



>0 

1 : SOUND 

"0170 

FCRTM=1 



IF EOF(-l) THEN 570 
PR I NT#-2 : NE X T V : GQT05 
FORTM= 1 T04 : SOUND200 
1 : NEXTTM: CL0SE#-1 : GO 
* * EXIT 
CLS: PR I NT© 174- "END" 

T0999: NEXT : CLS: END 

S95 '* SCREEN 15 

600 CLS:IFX>15 THEN620 

610 F0RZ=1 TOX:PRINTC$ (Z) ;TAB(B) 

T$ i 2 > ; TAB (14) F$ i I ) ; TAB ( 1 3 ) N* ( Z ) : 

NEXTZ:QOTO630 

620 FORZ-vX-15) TDK : PRINTC* < Z ) \ T 

AD(S>T$ (Z) ; TAB(14)F* (Z> ;TAB(1S)N 

$ (Z) :NEXTZ 

630 A*~INKEY*: IFA$<>CHR$ < 13) THE 

N630 ELSECLS:6OTO220 



Hint. ■ , 

You can double the speed at which CoCo operates with a 
simple POKE statement, entered either directly from the 
keyboard or within a program. The statement is POKE 
65495,0. This will speed up your CPU. You can return the 
computer to its normal speed again by POKE 65494,0. 



82 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



The Platinum 
worksaver 

...Programming Made Easy 

FULL SCREEN EDITING OF 
BASIC PROGRAMS 

With the PLATINUM WORKSAVER'S 
editor, there's no more counting the 
numbers of characters to delete or 
change, orwondering if you deleted 
too many or too few. You see the 
whole line as it's edited. Changes, 
deletes and inserts are automatic 
and the cursor can be moved any- 
where on the screen. 

FULL SCREEN EDITING OF 
NUMERIC AND STRING ARRAYS 

But that's only the beginning! The 
editor (Written in machine language) 
also comes with a short, two line 
BASICsubroutine that will allowyou 
to use the full screen editor on your 
numeric and string arrays. This is the 
springboard you need for develop- 
ing your own VisiCalc™ or word 
processor. 

SINGLE KEY ENTRIES OF 
BASIC WORDS 

So, the PLATINUM WORKSAVER 
makes it easier to write useful pro- 
grams and edit them, but that's not 
all! Entering programs is a breeze 
with single entry of over 80 basic 
words, on a beautifully designed 
KEYBOARD OVERLAY, color-keyed 
to function No need to memorize or 
consult a conversion chart to find a 
word. 

PROGRAM CHAINING AND 
DYNAMIC DEBUGGING 

Nowyou can write, enterand change 
programs easily, but what about de- 
bugging? This is the frustrating, time 
consuming aspect of programming 
and frankly, the Color Computer 
doesn't help you much . . . you have 
to start the program over each time 
you make a change. But not with 
the PLATINUM WORKSAVER!! With 
it you can change, delete, add and 
rearrange or join lines. The special 
reserved key is excellent for copying 
or moving parts of lines to other 
lines. . . plus, you can even LOAD 
A WHOLE NEW PROGRAM without 
disturbing the data you've created. 

NUMERIC KEYPAD 

We've solved another Color Com- 
puter weakness. Press a control key 
and letters J, K, L, U, I, O, P become 
number keys 1-7. Numbers 8-0 re- 
main in their normal positions. The 
key pad numbers are clearly labeled 
on the overlay. 

• Over 100 programmable keys • 

• Loads to Disk • 



A COLOR COMPUTER* MACHINE LANGUAGE ENHANCEMENT 
PACKAGE THAT PROVIDES: 

Dynamic full screen editing of BASIC programs. 
Dynamic full screen editing of numeric and string arrays. The ad- 
vanced user will be able to write VisiCalc™, word processor etc.! 
Single key entries for 80 commands and functions. /^^\ 
Functionally laid out plastic keyboard overlay. {ff^mSS 

RAINBOW 

Numeric Keypad conversion. cert^tk^ 

Automatic line numbering. 

Best value per dollarthananyotherenhancement package available. 

With the Platinum worksaver , programming time 
and hassle can be cut by 50%. You'll spend less time 
typing, more time being creative with your Platinum 
Enhanced 16K Color Computer! 



LOOK WHAT JUST $30 CAN DO FOR YOUR 16K COLOR COMPUTER: 


Platinum Enhanced 16K vs. 
Color Computer 




Regular 16K Extended 
Color Computer 


• Relocate, join, duplicate individual 
and unique sets of lines at the push 
of a button 


• 


Retype entirely any lines to be moved 
or joined 


• Create the following using only 31 
keystrokes: CLS:A$-Strings$ (15"") + 
MID$ (CL$, 6, 2). To change the - 
symbol to = requires only 3 key- 
strokes!!!! 


• 


Type that line using 47 keystrokes. To 
change the symbol, Backspace and 
retype using 33 more strokes! 


• Retain thesequence of commands in 


• 


Retype lost lines! 


temporary memory with special re- 
served key 






• One keypush and the right side of the 
keyboard converts to a numeric 
Keypad 


• 


Stretch those fingers! 


• Correct bugs while your program is 
running, without losing data. 


• 


Oops! Lost data! Retype, Reload and 

Save data while swearing a lot. 


• Edit programs, data and strings using 
the full screen editor. 


• 


NO CAN DO! 



THE PLATINUM WORKSAVER INCLUDES: 

• Enhancement program, including a sample array Editor, on a high-quality 
Agfa Cassette 

• Fully labeled acetate keyboard overlay, NOT a cheap stick-on 

• Complete instructions 

• Loads in seconds, takes less than 2K 




The PLATI N U M WORKSAVER costs $30.00 plus 
$3.00 S&H (NY residents add tax). To order 
write: 

PLATINUM SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 833 

Pittsburgh, N.Y. 12901 

Phone orders: (518) 643-2650 

VISA, MASIfKCAKD ACCEPTFD. WRSONAl CHECKS TAKI 
2-i WlrKSTO PROCESS 

16 K min. required 
Includes cassette merge 



platinum 

VOftUKIfO 

You're Serious About 
Your Color Computer? 
SO ARE WE, 



ogi*.U*rt»d trademarks of T.innY Corp. 



Hardware Review 



The Expressive, Expeditious, 
Exhilarating X-Pad! 

by Paul S. Hoffman 



Shortly after purchasing my Extended Basic Color 
Computer, I started exploringwaysin which 1 could expand 
its already marvelous graphics capabilities. One major 
question was, "What about other ways of entering 
information into the computer?" I could write programs to 
have CoCo ask me for X and Y coordinates; I could have it 
transfer joystick coordinates to the screen; but what if I 
wanted to quickly duplicate a piece of flat artwork? I 
obviously needed some sort of digitizer. (A digitizer is any 
piece of hardware which converts a hunk of the real world 
into numeric information.) 

I knew of graphics tabletsfrom demonstrations I'had seen 
of some sophisticated graphics software on an Apple. But 
the least expensive tablet available cost $700.00 and was also 
in kit form: assemble it yourself! There was also no 
indication that I would be able to interface it properly with 
my Color Computer. Why not get Radio Shack's Digitizer 
(model 26-1195) for $449.00? Well, this was about 10 
months before that product was announced, and even so, 
the price tag still seemed high. The product is also not 
specifically matched to the unique qualities of the 80C. 

Enter the X-Pad! (Wouldn't "X-Y Pad" be a more 
accurate name?) This is a full-fledged graphics tablet 
designed specifically for the Color Computer, and comes 
with an appropriate price tag ~ $350.00, one-half the lowest 
price I could find elsewhere! I ordered mine as soon as I had 
even an inkling that the product would soon exist! 

Briefly, I am more than pleased with my X-Pad: it's 
fantastic! Biggest disappointment: lack of good software 
support and some extremely touchy potentiometer 
adjustments. 





























































































































































































- 


- ^ i 










' h 


1 .' - _,. 












1 1 * 


bj 1 ' 














m 






■fk 



So, what exactly did I get for my $350.00? A silver-grey 
plastic box, W/i" by 13" by !/2"thick, with two cords coming 
out of one side. One cord goes to a controller pack indentical 
in size and shape to a TRS-80 Color Disk Controller. The 
other cord leads to a pen. An8!/2"by I T'area in the center of 




& 


9SBE 


End 


»2 


01F5 


End 


#3 


01 A4 


End 


#4 


0257 


End 


#5 


01DF 


End 


#6 


029D 


End 


#7 


020A 


End 


#8 


00B6 


End 










»•»• 






mk 



-.-ri»<;|-|fHllliH|rM||||llll 



the silver-grey box is recessed slightly to hold a standard 
piece of typing/ writing/ drawing paper. The box itself 
contains a rectangular grid which acts as a receivingantenna 
for signals sent by a transmitter in the pen. The received 
signal is decoded into an X-value and a Y-value. The grid 
network matches precisely the 256 by 192 Pixel coordinates 
of the Color Computer's high resolution screen. In addition 
to the transmitter in the pen, there is a spring-loaded switch 
which triggers if the pen point is pressed down on a surface. 
The writing implement is a ball-point pen, which is refillable 
(it uses a Fisher Space Pen refill). 

The hardware is really quite simple, and designed to be 
extremely easy to use if you can handle a little bit of 
programming. Three signals are sent to the computer: X- 
value, Y-value, and Pen Status. They are stored in three 
memory locations reserved by the SAM-chip for "future 
control registers or special I/O," 65376 (X), 65377 (Y), and 
65378 (S or Status). The X and Y locations can store a 
number from to 255. This obviously makes sense for the X- 
value; Y numbers beyond 191 represent positions outside 
the "drawing" area of the pad. The first four bits of the 
Status byte each have a different meaning. Together, they 
can represent a number from zero to 15. 

Bit = Pen Down 

Bit I = Proximity (pen within receiving range of the pad) 

Bit 2- X- Margin (pen off to the left or right of the drawing 
area) 

Bit 3 = Y-Margin (pen off above thedrawingarea — top of 
screen) 

In practice, the computer is constantly updating all three 
values (X, Y and Status), until you read them. As soon as you 
"PEEK(65376)," the other two values are held where they 
are (so you can get an accurate X, Y reading). Status may be 
read by itself at any time, however, so you can look for a 
particular pen position before checking X and Y. 

Now then, what can you do with all this? Just about 
anything you can imagine, if you can work out the necessary 
program! As I indicated earlier, the biggest drawback to the 
X-Pad is the lack of sophisticated (or even well-structured) 
software support. Part of the problem seems to be the 
inherent flexibility of the machine — what kind of program 
do you provide so that the X-Pad will do all things for all 
people? Early models of the X-Pad came with programming 
examples in the instruction book, but no demonstrations on 
cassette. There is now a free cassette with a demo program 
on it (#700-21 14) which should be supplied to every owner. 

By far, the hardest part of programming for the X-Pad is 
setting-up and reading a menu. Border areas around the 
active drawing area on your paper can be used as a selection- 
menu for various commands or values. The actual active 



84 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



ONLY THE BEST 

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AT THE BEST PRICE 

(under 75 cents a program 



***** 



Get 1 2 tapes a year containing over 75 colorful programs — and give 
your typing fingers a vacation. 

A subscription to CHROMASETTE Magazine consists of 6 to 8 
ready-to-load programs on tape delivered by First Class Mail every 
month. Programs like Blockade, Drawer, Mansion Adventure, CK 
Monitor, Append, Germ, and Cataloger. 

Give yourself an extended holiday — Get a subscription to 
CHROMASETTE Magazine. Or just take a break and try a back 
issue (your fingers may never work again) . . . 



1 year [ 1 2 issues) 
6 months (6 issues) 
Single Copies 



The Bottom Une: 

$45.00 Calif, residents add 6% to single copies. 

$25.00 North America — First Class postage included 

S 5.00 Overseas — add $10 to subscriptions and SI 

to single copies. Sent AO rate. 



The Fine Print: 

All issues from July 1981 available — ask for list. 
Programs are for the Extended BASIC models and occasionally for disks. 



*€hfcamaie±t& 



MAGAZINE 



P.O. Box 1087 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 (805) 963-1066 

MasterCard/ Visa 



RAINBOW 

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area is 7" high by 9" wide. This leaves approximately 3 A"top 
and bottom and 1" on each side for menu space. A coloful 
cardboard menu is provided with the X-Pad, with 
commands which match the demonstration program on the 
cassette. I found two drawbacks to this menu: the surface is 
not plasticized, and quickly gets lots of pen marks on it; and 
the Pad had trouble reading the pen signal through the 
thickness of cardboard. You'd be much better off creating 
your own menu area on a sheet of drawing paper. 1 drew up a 
black menu sheet and had a ream of paper printed-up at a 
local quick-print shop, as well as doing a ream of the 
specialized menu which matches my basic program. (See the 
accompanying sample.) 

A big disadvantage to Tandy's demonstration program is 
that it is a supreme example of UN-structured 
programming! Tracing the program's flow (in order to learn 
from it or make changes) is a real nightmare. The 
accompanying listings, if you work your way through them, 




The 

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THE HOME PURCHASER'S 

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COLOR COMPUTER 



• Program Projects up to 40 Years, and Computes: 

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• Displays Year of Purchase & Year of Sale Figures 

• Automatically Adjusted Federal Tax Schedules in Program 

• Considers Balloon (Variable Rate) Mortgages 

• Detailed Documentation Booklet Provided • Graph Results 

• Stores Input for Future Runs • Printer/Monitor Output 



• Requires Extended Basic 

• Printer Optional 



• Cassette - 32K Required 

• Disk- 16K Required 



PRICE $34.95 CASSETTE or $39.95 DISK 

Send Check o r Money Order (N.J. Residents Add 5 % Sales Tax) to: 

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(Dealer Inquiries Invited) 



should give you a much better handle on how to get the most 
out of your X-Pad, while building a structured program in 
the process. 

LISTING I sets up the beginning of a menu program. 
Initially, it will allow you to DRAW in Orange lines on a 
Buff screen, or CLEAR the screen to Buff. Notice that the 
program is completely organized in subroutines. The main 
loop, which will change very little as we add functions, is 
lines 20 through 50. Lines 5 and 10 initialize the basic 
graphics values (PMODE, COLOR, SCREEN). These are 
referred to through variables so that we can change them 
later in the program. The first major subroutine used is at 
line 600. Here, we get the current X-Pad values. This routine 
can also be entered at line 610 to update only the status byte. 
In line 30, the S (Status) value is incremented because we 
intend to use "ON S GOSUB," which would generate an 
error if S were equal to 0. Line 45 allows us to change the 
display page through hitting the appropriate key on the 
keyboard. 

The central routine to look at in this listing is from lines 
400 through 440 — this is where we read the top menu area. 
The program goes to this routine only if the pen is down in 
the upper menu area — i.e. you select a function by pressing 
the pen in one of the upper boxes. The computer then waits 
until you lift the pen, and then checks the X-coordinate of 
your location. A variable called "MENU" is set based on 
which box youYe in (MENU = X. width of one box). To let 
you know that your command has been properly received, a 
tone is sounded. Then youYe sent to the appropriate 
subroutine. 

NOTE: THIS PROGRAM IS WRITTEN TO WORK 
WITH THE ACCOMPANYING MENU, NOT WITH 
THE MENU CARD SUPPLIED BY RADIO SHACK. 

Listing I 

5 M=3:P=1:FG=8:BG=5:SC=1 
10 PMODE M,P : COLOR FG,BG : PCLS 
: SCREEN 1,SC 

BEGINNING OF MAIN LOOP 

20 GOSUB600 

30 S=S+1 

40 ON S GOSUB ,80,80,100,200,80, 

80,80,80,80,80,80,400,80,80, 
80,80 
45 A*=INKEY* : IF A*>"0" AND 

A*<"5" THEN P=VAL(A*> : 

PLAY A* : PMODE M,P : 

SCREEN 1,SC 
50 GOTO 20 

END OF MAIN LOOP 

? **BEGINNING OF SUB-ROUTINES 
RETURN: "NO ACTION 



70 
80 
90 



**PEN CLOSE TO PAD — FLASH 
CURSOR ! 
100 GOSUB600: 'READ CO-ORDINATES 
1 10 PS=PPOINT(X,Y) 
120 FOR CU=0 TO 8 

: NEXT 
130 PSET(X,Y,PS) 
140 RETURN 



PSET(X,Y,CU) 



86 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



190 '^TOUCHING DRAWING SURFACE** 

**GO TO PROPER SUBROUTINE** 
200 ON MENU GOSUB 80,80,1300, 

80 , 80 , 80 , 80 , 80 , 80 , 80 
210 RETURN 
390 ' ***READ TOP MENU AND***** 

*SET THE APPROPRIATE FLAG* 
400 GOSUB 610 : IF (S AND 1)=1 

THEN 400 : 'WAIT FOR PEN UP 
410 MENU=INT(X/25.6)+l: 'MAXIMUM 

X-VALUE (256) DIVIDED BY THE 

NUMBER OF SPACES IN THE TOP 

MENU (10) 
420 PLAY STR*(MENU) : 'LETS YOU 

KNOW THAT YOU'VE SELECTED A 

MENU ITEM. 
430 ON MENU GOSUB 80,80,1300,80, 

80,80,80,80, 1900,80 
440 RETURN 

590 '***READ THE X-PAD **** 
600 X=PEEK (65376) :Y=PEEK (65377) 
610 S=PEEK (65378) 
620 RETURN 

1290 ' *****DRAWING MODE******** 
1300 GOSUB 100 
1310 GOSUB 610 : IF S<>3 THEN 

RETURN 
1320 PSET(X,Y,FG) 
1330 GOSUB 610 : IF S<>3 THEN 

RETURN 
1340 XX=X : YY=Y : GOSUB 600 
1350 LINE(XX,YY)-(X, Y) , PSET 
1360 GOTO 1330 

1890 '*****CLEAR SCREEN******** 
**TO BACKGROUND COLOR***** 
1900 PCLS(BG) 
1910 RETURN 

Once youVe explored the sketching possibilities, expand 
the program by adding LISTING 2. This involves a change 
in step 430, and the addition of lines 1990 to 2130. What 
youVe added is the ability to select foreground and 
background colors. Press "COLOR" on the top menu and 
then TWO different color selections in the bottom menu, 
one for foreground, the second for background. Now if you 
press "CLEAR" the screen will clear to your new 
background color. 

Listing 2 

430 ON MENU GOSUB 80,80,1300,80. 

80,80,80,80, 1900,2000 
1990 '***SET FOREGROUND AND*** 

♦♦♦♦BACKGROUND COLORS**** 
2000 GOSUB 610 : IF (S AND 1)=1 

THEN 2000 r'WAIT FOR PEN UP 
2010 GOSUB 2100 : PLAY STR*<C+1) 
2020 FG=C 

2030 GOSUB 2100 : PLAY STR*(C+1) 
2040 BG=C : IF BG>4 OR FG>4 THEN 

SC=1 ELSE SC=0 
2045 SCREEN 1 , SC 



2050 COLOR FG,BG 

2060 RETURN 

2090 '**BOTTOM MENU SELECTION** 

2100 GOSUB 600 : IF S<>3 THEN 

2100 r'WAIT FOR PEN DOWN ON 
DRAWING SURFACE OR BOTTOM 
MARGIN 

2110 IF Y<192 OR Y>200 THEN 2100 

2120 C=INT(X/28.334) : ' 256/9 

2130 RETURN 



-~^ 



ml* 



feFfc^c: 



w. 



11 Iff A r ' N — v- 

Xl 1 J ^ 

LISTING 3 adds "PAINT" and "ERASE" functions. 
With PAINT you will need to select two colors, as in 
COLOR. The first color is the painting color, the second is 
the border color which will limit the painting. Then you 
position your pen in an area to paint. When you press the 
pen down, the area will be painted. THIS FUNCTION 
STAYS ACTIVE UNTIL YOU SELECT ANOTHER 
MENU FUNCTION. In other words, youcan keep painting 
areas the same color until you decide to change colors or 
functions. To get new paint colors, you need to re-press 
PAINT. 

Listing 3 

200 ON MENU GOSUB 80,80.1300, 
1450, 1500,80,80,80,80,80 

430 ON MENU GOSUB 80,80,1300, 

1400, 1500,80,80,80, 1900,2000 

1390 ' *******PAINT************* 

1400 GOSUB 2100 : PLAY STR$(C+1) 

1410 PC=C 

1420 GOSUB 2100 : PLAY STR$ (C+l ) 

1430 BC=C 

1440 RETURN 

1450 PAINT(X, Y) ,PC,BC 

1460 RETURN 

1490 ? *******ERASE*#*********** 

1500 GOSUB 100 : GOSUB 610 : IF 
5<>3 THEN RETURN 

1510 PSET(X,Y,BG) 

1520 GOSUB 610 : IF S<>3 THEN 
RETURN 

1530 XX=X : YY=Y : GOSUB 600 

1540 LINE(XX, YY)-(X,Y) , PRESET 

1550 GOTO 1520 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 87 



Supe 



r "Color" Writer ll_ 

A "ROLLS ROYCE" FOR YOUR COLOR COMPUTER rainbow 



CEJTTIfKaTON 

SCAi 



If you are contemplating buying a word processor -for your TRS-B0C 
Color Computer or TDP System 100 Personal Computer, look no further'! 
The Suger " Col_q_r" Mri_ter is the most powerful and most versatile word 
processor available- This user- friendl y program gives you many times 
the power and speed „ and MORE MEMORY than any other word processor for 
your computer. The Suger "Col_or" Writer does it all! 

No other program lets you fully use every capability built 
into your printer, AND H1TH EASE/ Emphasis, italics.. double 

strike, normal mode, compressed, el ongated -compressed mode, and 
El L. C*MG>£* TB1Z? E:MF*H£ZS Z ZBliy Z T &L. Z CS are at 

your fingertips, all within JUSTIFIED text. Underlining is a 
breeze! All the parameters for proper page formatting (margins, 
page length, etc.) are fully alterable. Yet, without changing a 
single thing you can print text perfectly the first time. 

Don't think for a minute that the Super "Color" Writer II 
won't work with your letter quality printer. There's-^no reason 
you can't give H^O its proper name or have footnotes. As for 
bold print, underlining ; proportional spacing, super bold or any 
other printer-controlled function - if your printer has it , the 
£UE£T "Color" Writer XI can do iti You can also freely exchange 
thimbles or daisy wheels to change to italics, or to a totally 
different typeface with the pause print feature. 

And the Sa£^r "Color" Hri_ter II has the exclusive WINDOW to make 
your formatting pleasant and perfect. Enter the window to view your 
whole text as it will be sent to the printer, whatever your margins, 
from 1 to 200 or more! No longer will you be tied to seeing only 32, 
51, 64 or whatever number of characters on a line. You can see that 
your text is centered, headers and footers are always properly placed, 
and your columns are correct. 

With the Sug&£ "Color" Mr iter I_I_ screen editing is a snap; the 
commands are powerful and hard to forget. You can edit all your BASIC 
PROGRAMS TOO! With all these features, you must surely agree that 
this is the "ROLLS ROYCE" of word processors. To learn more, refer to 
the Nelson Software Systems ad in this magazine. And don't forget 
that the Suger "Color" Ureter I_I_ is only one important part of the 
Super "Color" Library , which includes the Super "Color" Terminal , the 
Super "Color" Mailer, the Super "Color" Disk-ZAP and the soon to be 
released Super "Color" Calc and Super "Color" Database. No other 

company gives you such outstanding products and support. You can buy 
theirs now and ours later, OR you can save your money and get the best 
from the very start ! 

This document was prepared using a TRS-&0< TM > Color Computer , the 
Suger "Color" Mr Iter II, an Epson MX- 80 Graftrax Plus <TM>, and an NEC 
Spinnriter 3510 (TM) to illustrate the great flexibility in formatting 
allowed by the Suger "Color" Ureter II. 

Spinwriter is a tradeaark of NEC Inforaation Systeas, Inc. MX-80 Braftrax Plus is a tradeaark of Epson Aaerica f Inc. 
TRS-80 and TDP Systea 100 Personal Coaputer are tradeaarks of the Tandy Corporation. 



THE ULTIMATE IN COLORCOMPUTING 

For the TRS'BQ Color Computer and TOP System 100 Persona I Computer 

Super "Color" Writer IIS Super "Color" Terminal 

fly Tim Nelton |ggjjg g y Dfln Helton 

The Rolls Royce of Word Processors The Ultimate in Smart Terminals 



The Super "Color" Wrller is a FAST, machine code, full featured, 
character (screen) oriented word processing system for the TRS-BO™ 
Color Computer and ANY printer. The video display is styled after a 
professional phosphor (green characters on black background) display 
for hours of use without eye fatigue {optional orange on black). The 
unique print WINDOW frees you from 32, 51 or 64 character lines 
FOREVER! This window can be moved anywhere in the text file, up, 
down, left or right to display the text as it will be printed without wasting 
paper. You can create or edit Super "Color" Terminal files. ASCII files, 
BASIC programs or Editor/ Assembler source listings. It's simple enough 
for beginners with 4K and ... for the professional writer with a 32K disk 
system and a lot to say, there's plenty of room to say it! 

COMPARISON CHART SUPER COLOR WRITER THE COMPETITION 

System Sjze 4K 16K 32K 4K 16K 32K 

TAPE: Te*t space N/A 7K 23K N/A 2K 18K 

ROMPAK: Teat space Z.EK 16K 31K KM N/A N/A 

DISK: Text space N/A 5.5K 21.5K N/A 0-5* 16.SK 

mghl Justify YES NO 

Video Window YES NO 

Edit any ASCII File YES NO 

Programmable Function YES NO 

The figures speak for themselves and with professional features like 
PROGRAMMABLE function string commands to perform up to 28 
commands automatically. PROGRAMMABLE text file chaining, 
PROGRAMMABLE column insert & delete, end right hand 
JUSTIFICATION with punctuation precedence, the choice is clear but 
there's still more! In their September '82 issue. "BO MICRO" says, "The 
Color Computer has finally come of age. Nothing illustrates that coming 
of age better than this offering {SUPER "COLOR" WRITER) by Nelson 
Software". The Super "Color' 1 Writer takes full advantage of the new 
breed of "smart printers" with Control codes 1-31 20 Programmable 
control codes 0-255 for special needs. Works perfectly with all Epson, 
Radio Shack, Ok i data, NEC. IDS, Centronics, Citoh, Smith Corona, 
Diablo Etc., Matrix, or Letter Quality Printers. 

CHECK THESE FEATURES!! 
User friendly • Easy commands * 32K Compatible * Window ■ Key beep • 
HELP table ■ 128 character ASCII & graphics * Mem left and Mem used * 
Full cursor control • Quick paging * Scrolling * Word wrap around * Tabs 
* Repeat all functions * Repeat last command * Insert character & line * 
Delete character, delete to end cf line, line to cursor, line & block * Block 
move, copy & delete ■ Global Search, Exchange & Delete * Merge or 
Append files • Imbed Control Codes in text • Underline • Superscripts * 
Subscripts • Headers. Footers & 2 Auxiliary footnotes on odd, even or all 
pages definable position • Flush right • Non-breakable space ■ 4 
centering modes: 5. 8.3. 10 & 16 .7 (CPI) * Full page & print formatting in 
text ■ Single sheet pause • Set Page length • Line length, Line specing. 
Margins. Page numbers * Title pages • Printer baud: 1 10, 300. 600, 1 200, 
2400 ■ Linefeeds after CR * Soft & hard formfeed • Works with S bit 
printer fix ■ and more! 

Super "Color" Writer II Disk 

The Disk version of the Super "Color" Wrller works with the TRS-SOC 
Disk System and hes all the features listed above plus many more! Use 
with up to four Disk Drives. Includes an extended HELP table you can 
access at any time. Call a directory, print FREE space, Kill disk files and 
SAVE and LOAD text files you've created all from the Super "Color 
Wrller Print, merge or append any Super "Color" Terminal file, ASCII 
file. BASIC program or Ed iter/ Assembler source listing stored on the 
Disk or tape. The Super "Color" Writer Disk version has additional for- 
matting and print features for more control over your printer and 
PROGRAMMABLE chaining of disk files for "hands off operation. Print 
an entire BOOK without ever touching a thing! Includes comprehensive 
90 plus page Tutorial manual. 

TAPE $49.95 ROMPAK $74.95 DISK $99.95 

Tutorial only $15.00 (Refundable with purchase) 

ORDERING INCLUDE $3.00 for shipping in the U.S. & Canada, 
$6.00 for Foreign orders. C-O-D. add $2.00. 



NELSON 

SOFTWARE 

SYSTEMS 



FAST, machine code, full featured, The Super "Color" Terminal turns the Color Computer into a Super-smart 

d processing system for the TRS-80 1 " terminal with all the features of VIDEOTEX 1 " plus much more, 

sr. The video display is styled after a COMMUNICATE with Dow Jones & CompuServe and with computers like 

aracters on black background) display the TRS-S0™ MODEL l F II, III, APPLE etc, via moden or RS-232 direct! 

Igue (optional orange on black). The Save the date to tape or print ft! Reduces ON-LINE cost to a minimum! 

>u from 32, 51 or 64 character lines FEATURES 

i moved anywhere in the text file, up h 10 buffer size settings from 2-30K • Buffer full indicator • Prints buffer 

ext as it will be printed without wasting contents • Full 128 ASCII keyboard * Compatible with Super "Color" 

iper "Color" Terminal files. ASCII files, Writer files * UPLOAD & DOWNLOAD ASCII files. Machine Language & 

ibler source listings. It's simple enough Basic programs • Set RS-232 parameters * Duplex: Half/Full • Baud Rate: 

the professional writer with a 32 K disk no. 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4600 • Word Lengths 5. 6. 7 or 8 • Parity: Odd. 

plenty of room to say it! Even or None • Stop Bits: 1-9 ■ Local linefeeds to screen ■ Tape save £ 

:OLOR WftfTER THE COMPETITION t0atI * 0r ASCII files, Machine code & Basic programs * Unique clone 

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LISTING 4 adds LINES, CIRCLES, and BOXES. The 
core of these routines is the subroutine from lines 1805 to 
1835. In this routine the cursor flashes until a point is 
selected, then the same thing for a second point. For LINE, 
the line will be drawn between the two selected points, using 
the current foreground color. For BOX, select the upper-left 
corner of the box position, then the lower-right corner. In 
drawing a CIRCLE, you first set the center position, then 
any point on the perimeter. Again, as in the other 
commands, the function will stay active until a new menu 
selection is made. 

Listing 4 

200 ON MENU GOSUB 80,80,1300, 

1450, 1500, 1600, 1700, 1800,80, 

80 
430 ON MENU GOSUB 80,80,1300, 

1400, 1500, 1600, 1700, 1800, 

1900,2000 
1590 * *******LINES************* 
1600 GOSUB 1805 
1630 LINE(XX,YY)-(X,Y) , PSET 
1640 RETURN 

1690 ' ****DRAW CIRCLES********* 
1700 GOSUB 1805 
1750 PRESET (XX, YY) 

1760 R=SQR(ABS<X-XX)^2+ABS<Y-YY> 
^2) 

1770 CIRCLE(XX, YY) ,R,FG 
1780 RETURN 



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1790 


* *****DRAW BOXES********** 


1800 


GOSUB 1805 : GOTO1840 




1805 


GOSUB 100 : GOSUB 610 
S<>3 THEN 1805 


: IF 


1810 


PSET(X,Y,FG> : XX=X : 


YY=Y 


1815 


GOSUB 610 : IF (S AND 
THEN 1815 


1 ) = 1 


1820 


GOSUB 100 : GOSUB 610 
S<>3 THEN 1820 


: IF 


1830 


GOSUB 610 : IF (S AND 
THEN 1830 


1) = 1 


1835 


RETURN 




1840 


L I NE ( X X „ YY ) - ( X , Y ) , PSET 


\B 


1850 


RETURN 





Now comes the gravy! (Or is it the stuffing?) LISTING 5 is 
for the COPY routine. In very sophisticated computer 
graphics systems, this is called a "PAINTBRUSH" 
function. It will allow you to "pick up" a section of the 
screen, and then "draw" with that image. You can, of course, 
simply plop the image back down somewhere for the 
purpose of repeating a motif, but the fun comes in the 
fascinating fat or fuzzy lines you can doodle with! After 
entering the listing, try this: select foreground and 
background COLORS, CLEAR the screen, then create a 
little squiggly doodle in one or two colors (using DRAW). 
Now select COPY. Position your cursor to the upper left of 
your squiggle, press down, then do the same at the lower 
right of the squiggle. You have just picked up the squiggle 
and can now draw with it wherever you press your pen. 
How'd we do it? The secret is in the use of the -OR" in the 
PUT command in line 1150. 

Listing 5 

7 DIM C0<15, 15) 

200 ON MENU GOSUB 1120,80,1300, 
1450, 1500, 1600, 1700, 1800,80, 
80 

ON MENU GOSUB 1100,80,1300, 
1400, 1500, 1600, 1700, 1800, 
1900,2000 
? ********COPY************* 
**SETS UP PAINT BRUSHES*** 
FG=0 : FL=0 : RETURN 
IF FG=1 THEN 1150 ELSE IF 
FL=1 THEN 1135 
1125 GOSUB610 : IF (S AND 1)=1 
THEN 1125 
AX=X : AY=Y : 
GOSUB610 : IF 
THEN 1135 
1140 BX=*X : BY=Y : 
X,BY),CO,G : FG^l 

1 150 PUT ( X , Y ) - ( X+BX-AX , Y+BY-AY ) 
CO, OR : RETURN 



430 



1090 

1100 
1120 



1130 
1135 



FL=1 : 
(S AND 



RETURN 
1)=1 



GET(AX, AY)-<B 
RETURN 



If you're still with us after that bit of magic, type in 
LISTING 6 so you can play around with different 
PMODES and also save/load your creations to/from 
TAPE. As in theselectionofpagenumbers in the main loop, 
you must type the number of the mode you want on the 
keyboard. I have tried using the left menu for inputting 
numeric information, but found that any slight 



90 the RAINBOW January, 1983 



misadjustment in the Y-circuit caused errors in 
differentiation between boxes. Both my X-Pad and the 
demo model in the local computer center are prone to 
getting out of adjustment in the Y direction -- so I felt it wise 
to avoid the need for precision in reading the side menus. 

Listing 6 

40 ON S GOSUB 80,80,100,200,80, 
80, 80, 80, 80,80,80, 400,80, 80, 
80,500 
495 ' ******UPPER CORNERS******* 
500 GOSUB 610 : IF <S AND 1 ) =1 

THEN 500 : 'WAIT FOR PEN UP 
510 IF X<225 THEN 550 : 'RIGHT 
520 PLAY STR*<11> 
530 M*=INKEY* : IF M*=" " THEN 

530 ELSE IF M*<"0" AND M*> 

"4" THEN 530 
535 PLAY M$ : M=VAL(M*> 
540 PMODE M,P : SCREEN 1 , SC : 

RETURN 
545 ? ******RIGHT CORNER***-*-*-*-** 
550 PLAY STR*<12> : CLS : PRINT 

IPRINT "SAVE OR LOAD <S,L>?" 
555 I*=INKEY* : IF I*=" "THEN 555 
560 IF I*<>"S" AND I$<>"L" THEN 

SCREEN 1,SC : RETURN 
565 PRINT : INPUT "FILE NAME" ; F* 
570 PRINT : PRINT"POSITION TAPE 
- ANY KEY TO CONTINUE -" 
575 I$=INKEY* : IF I*=" "THEN 575 
580 IF I$="S" THEN CSAVEM F$, 

1536,1535+6144,380 : 

SCREEN 1,SC : RETURN 
585 SCREEN 1 , SC : CLOADM F* : 

RETURN 

BUT, we don't want to ignore the existence of these side 
menus, so LISTING 7 will direct the computer to places in 
the program where you can insert your own routines. Left 
menu selection would be in lines 315 through 339, right 
menu in lines 350 through 444. In both cases, the item 
selected would be determined by the current Y-value. We 
need to loop through this area in order to access the lower 
corners, one of which is reserved for a call to your favorite 
screen dump routine. I personally use the other corner to call 
my adaptatin of the "TEXTURES" program by George 
Fraser from the June, 1982 issue of Tandy's TRS-80 
MICROCOMPUTER NEWS. 

Listing 7 
40 ON S GOSUB 80,80.100,200,80, 
80, 80, 300, 80, 80, 80, 400, 80, 80, 
80,500 
290 ' ******LEFT AND RIGHT****** 
*******MENU SELECTION****** 
300 GOSUB 600 : IF S<>7 THEN 300 
: 'WAIT FOR PEN DOWN ON L OR 
R MARGIN 
305 IF Y>192 THEN 450 : 7 LOWER 

CORNERS 
310 IF X<225 THEN 350 : 'RIGHT 



MENU 
315 RETURN 

340 ? ******RIGHT MENU********* 
350 RETURN 

445 * *****LOWER CORNERS******** 
450 IF X<25.6 THEN 700 : 'LOWER 

RIGHT CORNER 
460 'INSERT HERE A CALL TO YOUR 

FAVORITE SCREEN DUMP ROUTINE 
470 RETURN 

690 '***LOWER RIGHT CORNER***** 
700 RETURN 



p jjgW 




LISTING 8 simply fills out the program by accountingfor 
one all-but-forgotten box in the upper menu, the one 
marked "TEXT." If you have 32K, you will have enough 
room left in memory to add a subroutine at 1200 to draw 
letters and numbers on the screen. Try using M.H. Endres' 
"Graphic Screen Character Set" from the Rainbow, May, 
1982, or Ron VanDyke's "Hi-Res Character Generator" 
from TRS-80 MICROCOMPUTER NEWS, April, 1982. 

On my 32K machine, I call the final program (with 
TEXTURE, PRINTER, and TEXT) "Superpad. "This little 
combination of CoCo, X-Pad and the right programming 
makes a package which rivals almost any graphics system 
available for any micro out there. 

One final note: If you have Tandy's MICROPAINTER 
cartridge, the pictures on the micropainterdatatapeandany 
pictures saved on tape from Micropainter are loadable and 
modifiable with this program, and VICE VERSA! My only 
criticism of Micropainter is that freehand drawing is 
extremely tedious (pixel by pixel). Try doing a line drawing 
with the X-Pad, saving it to tape, power down, insert 
Micropainter, load your saved picture, and PLAY AWAY! 

Listing 8 

200 ON MENU GOSUB 1120,1200-1300 

, 1450, 1500, 1600, 1700, 1800,80 

,80 
430 ON MENU GOSUB 1100,1200,1300 

, 1400, 1500, 1600, 1700, 1800, 

1900,2000 
1190 S, **DRAWING ALPHANUMERICS** 
1200 RETURN 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 91 



Education Notes.. 



j 



"User Friendly" 
Requires Friendly Users 

By Steve Blyn 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



(Mr. Blyn, who leaches both exceptional and gifted children, holds 
two Master 's degrees in the field of education and has won an award 
for the design of a computer program to aid handicapped children. 
He and his wife, Cheryl, own Computer Island.) 

"User friendly" is the term that describes whether a 
program interacts in a social manner with its user. All 
educationalprograms should be as user friendly as practical. 
It is not wise to go overboard, however, even with something 
as good as "user friendly," as too much of a good thing can 
always become a turn-off. As a rule of thumb, all 
educational programs should give a nice, friendly greeting, 
and then ask for the player's name. In the case of a child, this 
not only gives the child a personal feeling about the 
program, but it also "alerts" the computer to the child's 
name. This useful information may be used again at various 
strategic times in the program. 

Let's call the INPUTted name NN$. The computer may 
answer immediately with a "HELLO, NN$,"or it may later 
tell NN$ if each answer is correct, or it may use NN$ in a 
report card or in any other part of the program. Once the 
computer picks up the information for NN$, it will 
remember and can, of course, use it until the computer is 
turned off, or another NN$ is INPUTted. 

One large pitfall that may be encountered with this 
technique is the diversity of responses that may be 
INPUTted by children. There is no way of knowing 
beforehand the possible responses to the question — "What 
is your name?" You must be prepared to receive answers 
such as Sue or Suzanne Angelina Washington or even Susie 
the Magnificent. Each of these are real responses that I have 
received from the same child at different times. Surprise or 
unpredictable responses are normal when dealing with kids. 
Out of natural curiosity, children will often INPUT weird 
answers, merely to see the computer's reaction. There really 
is no problem with long, elegant responses except that they 
will mess up your carefully-designed video displays. 

Let's consider the simple statement— INPUT'WHAT IS 
YOUR NAME";NN$. The semi-colon (;) indicates that the 
name will be printed on the same line as the question. This, 
however, only leaves 14 spaces for the name on that line. If 
the name does beyond 14 letters, the child will see his name 
split up in an inappropriate and unattractive manner. This 
would be unsound, both educationally aesthetically. The 
problem can become worse later on in the program in a 
circumstance such as— PRINT"CONGR ATULA- 
TIONS";NN$;"YOU WIN." Unless the length of NN$ is 
known and controlled, the congratulations message may be 
broken up almost beyond recognition at the end of the line, 
and the user friendly intent will be completely lost. 

There are two solutions to this problem. The first is to 
simply print NN$ on a new line every time it is used. This 
works well when the child is first asked to INPUThis name, 
but will not work well later on for the computer's messages 
to the child. Short names appearing alone on a line may 
seem as inappropriate as the extra long names. 

A much better idea is to have the computer read the first 
ten or so letters of NN$ as a separate string "N$." Most first 



names do not exceed eight or nine letters. We will therefore 
have the computer create a more usable string celled N$ — 
N$=LEFT$(NN$,10). This will limit the video output of the 
name to the first ten letters. If the child's name is shorter, 
there will be no problem. If the name is longer, then only the 
first ten letters will be printed when the program formatting 
calls for it. 

This program makes use of three INPUTs from the child 
to create an endless amount of stories about him, a friend, 
and his choice of any verb. Although the story line is very 
controlled, it does have much randomness included for 
variety. Lines 50-200 pick random words. You may, of 
course, change or increase the choices in your own version of 
this program. Lines 260 and 290 ask for the child's and a 
friend's name. Lines 270 and 300 convert possible long 
INPUTs to a controllable maximum of 10 letters. This is 
necessary to keep the story readable at all times. Line 320 
asks for any verb to be INPUT. Lines 380-420 print out the 
actual story. If you have a printer, then create additional 
lines here using PRINT #-2, to give hard copy output as a 
bonus. Line 440 asks if you want another story. If the answer 
begins with a "Y" (some children are not content with a 
simple yes, but type "ya" or "yessiree"), then another story 
will immediately appear for additional reading practice, or 
enjoyment. An unlimited amount of stories can thus be 
created from the original three INPUTs. 

After you'f eel comfortable with this program, try altering 
the story line to a new theme. Be careful to control the 
INPUTs by string manipulations to keep exactly the string 
lengths you want on each line. We at Computer Island look 
forward to hearing of your problems and successes. 

The listing: 

********************* "!&/^ 

'STORIES 

'STEVE BLYN 

'COMPUTER ISLAND, N.Y. 

GOTO220 



QhtA 



VB=RND<5> :C=RND(3) : J=RND(2) 
IFVB=1THENVB$= ,, DANCE" :PL$="PA 





10 

20 

30 

40 

50 

60 

RK" 

70 IFVB=2THENVB*= ,, SKIP" :PL*="BEA 

CH" 

80 IFVB=3THENVB*="RUN":PL*="W00D 

S" 

90 IFVB=4THENVB*="JUMP":PL*= ,, ST0 

RE" 

100 IFVB=5THENVB*="H0P ,, :PL*= ,, M0V 

IES" 

110 IFX=1THENX*=" 

120 IFX=2THENX*=" 

130 IFX=3THENX*= M 

140 IFX=4THENX*=" 

150 IFX=5THENX*=" 

160 IFC=1THENC*=" 

170 IFC=2THENC*=" 

180 IFC=3THENC*=" 

190 IF J=lTHENT$="EARLY n 

200 IF J=2 THEN T*="LATE" 

210 RETURN 

220 CLS8 : PR I NT : PR I NT676 , " st or i es 

" ; : FORX=0TO63 : SET ( X , 7 , 7 ) : SET ( X , 8 

,7) :nextx 

230 PRINT@192," THIS IS A PROGR 



End 



PARK " 
BEACH " 
WOODS " 
STORE " 
MOVIES " 
MORNING. " 
AFTERNOON. 
EVENING. " 



92 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



ESCAPE 

A 3-D GRAPHICS ADVENTURE WITH SOUND 

(Machine Language for Fast Action) 
This is NOT the usual "find the treasure" adventure. In 
ESCAPE, you are trapped on the top floor of a 
skyscraper and the only way out is by using a very 
unusual elevator. You must give the elevator the 
correct code or else the ride down is a real killer. The 
maze-like halls seem to cometolifeduetothefantastic 
3-D graphics. Search the hallsforrooms which contain 
clues to the correct code. Clues must be deciphered to 
learn the elevator's secret code. Game times depends 
on the skill of the player, but it is typically 8-10 hours. 
ESCAPE is suitable for group play. A mentally 
stimulating experience. 
16K BASIC $18.95 




RECIPE FILE 

A CASSETTE BASED STORAGE AND 
RETRIEVAL SYSTEM 
This program permits storage of your favorite recipes 
for retrieval by your computer. Once a recipe has been 
recalled, then the computer can adjust the ingredient 
measure for serving the desired number of persons. 
Each recipe can contain special comments on 
preparation aswell asthefull instructionsforusingthe 
recipe. Included is a line oriented text editor for 
creating and editing the variable length files. 
Completely menu driven and very user friendly. Easily 
modified by theuserfor use in keeping track of record, 
coin or stamp collections or whatever your interest. 
Screen or printer output. 

16K Ext. BASIC $21.95 

SPECIAL: A collection of 30 recipies covering main 
meals to snacks. Only $3,95 with program. 



SQUIRE 

SQUIRE is a challenging game of 
asset management. The player must 
manage a country estate and contend 
with crop failure, investment losses, 
taxes and other such headaches. The 
object of the game is to increase the 
estate's value while providing for the 
peasant workers. The starting assets 
are computer selected so that each 
I game offers different challenges. 

I Great experience for the kids or 
aspiring executives. 



16K Ext. BASIC 



$14.95 






HOUSEHOLD EXPENSE 
MANAGER 

This menu driven program package is 
designed for creating and 
maintaining a data file on cassette of 
30 household expense categories for 
a 12-month period. It also keeps 
cumulative totals and a separate total 
of tax deductable expenses. A 
comparative analysis program 
provides a graphic presentation of 
relative expenses between any two 
months during the year. The user can 
change categories by modifying 
program code. Screen or printer 
output. 
16K Ext. BASIC $19.95 



FLIPPER 



■B 



A fun and challenging version of the 
Othello™ type board games. This 
version includes options for play 
solely by the computer, one player 
against the computer, or two players 
against each other. The computer 
can play on four skill levels. Very 
colorful with plenty of sound. Fun for 
kids and challengingfor adults. Great 
for parties. 



16K Ext BASIC 




$16.95 




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PLAYED IN THE AOVEN 



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IN THIS PARTICULAR MISADVENTURE THE PLAYER HAS IO MAKE 
HIS WAY FROM THE SLEAZY DESERTED WHARFS. GAIN ADMITTANCE 
TO THE ANCIENT SPEAKEASY. AND ATTEMPT TO DISCOVER THE 
HIDDEN PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE POLITICIANS BEAUTIFUL DAUGHTER 1 
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WINO PREFERS CHEAP 80O2E' ABOVE ALL TRY TO ESCAPE WITHOUT 
NEEDING ANY INJECTIONS OF PENICILLIN!!! 



IIS AD VENTURE 



-SHIRT CONTEST 

AUGHTY. MISADVENTURE THE PL«"lB 

A LOUD POUNDING ON THE DOOB' 

HAT YOU PAY THE BOSS THE MONEY 



AWAKENS ONE MORNING 
THUGS ENTER AND IEUA 
fl*EP 1C HIM r D H i G m T ■ ■ • 

YOU MUST SURVIVE THE MANY INTERESTING SITUATIONS 

FOUND IN 1 HE OVER 100 LOCATIONS' THE SCIENTIST MAY HAVE A 
WAY 1 Li * f> I V I VfJllH Pft^UKFk* - IF ¥flU &01VE Ml* PfcOiLlM 1 
PERHAPS THE PRIZE MONEY FOR THE WET T-SHIRT CONTEST 

win H I f n i:. 1 1 f, n 

although very challenging this is a fun game, so be 

PREPARED TO ENJOY YOURSELF'' 

MISADVENTURE N9 3 SEWER OF MOSCOW 

IN I HIS PARTICULAR MISADVENTURE THE PLAYER SMISSIDh 

REGARDLESS OF WHETHER HE ACCEPTS IT OR NOT IS TO ELIMI- 
NATE THE IMMEDIATE POSSIBILITY OF W W HI • BEWARE OF THE 
TREACHEROUS SEWER' WATCH OUT FOB THE SWIFTSUBWAV VEHI- 
CLES' AVOID THE LOYAL COMMUNISTS! THERE ARE OVER 70 LOCA- 
TIONS. SO BE VERY CAREFUL NOT TO GET LOST OR KILLED IN 
luiS »Uf'AlWI Nl U*l 

THE BEAUTIFUL SPY YOU FIND TIED S P R E A O - E A G L E D TO A 
BED HOLDS HIE KEY TO THIS MISADVENTURE. BUT BE VERY 
CAREFUL WHAT YOU DO TO HER 

THIS IS DIE HARDEST MISADVENTURE YET' 

MISAOVENTURE N? 4 CASINO OF PLEASURE 

CASINO OF PLEASURE MISAOVENTURE IS AN EXCELLENT 
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FORT-230TG2005TEP-2: SOUMDT. 1 : MEX 

T 

250 PRINT6389, "PRESS ENTER TO GO 

ON"; : INPUT H* 
260 CLS: PRINT 18 WHAT IS YOUR 

NAME": INPUTNN* 
270 N*=LEFT*(NN$, 10) 
2S0 GOSUB4S0 

290 PRINT" NAME ONE OF YOUR FR I 
ENDS": INPUT A A* 
300 A*~LEFT* <AA$, 10) 
310 GOSUB480 

320 PRINT" NAME AN ACTION WORD 
THAT ENDS IN y INS' " 

: INPUTO$ 
ZZ0 GOSUB480 

340 CLS5:PRINT@0, » HERE IS "?N 

$; ,,? S STORY" :FORT=1TO600: NEXT! 
350 SQ3LB50 

360 fort =1 to 10: sound 100, 1 :nextt 
370 forx*0to63: set (x, 3, 8) :next 
380 prints97, "it was "st-*;" in t 
he ! ?c^:for t= i to 600: next t 

390 PRINT@160 ? N$! " AMD "SA*? iE W 

ERE": FOR T= I TO 600: NEXT T 
40& Pf*2NT©224.0*; " ON THEIR WAY 
TO THE": FOR T^ 1 TO 600: NEXT T 
410 PRINTQ288. PL*; " . THEN THEY 3 
TARTED TO": FOR T- 1 TO 600: NEXT 

T 
420 PRINT8352, VB*5 " AND HAD A LO 
T OF FUN. " 

3 30 FORT=1TO5:SGUND220, l:NEXT 
4-40 PRINT@448, "do you want anoth 
er story ( Y/N) M ; : INPUT OS 

450 CLS : SOUND200 , 4 : SOUND 1 70 , 4 : SO 
UNIDi50, 4 

4 60 IF LEFT* <Q«, 1 >= M v^ THEN 340 
470 PRINT "BYE FOR NOW": END 

480 PR I NT : PR I NT " - - ~ - 

»; :FORT«100TO200 

STEPS: SQUNDT, 1 : NEXT: RETURN 



FIVE EXCITING GAMES 

LINE DANCE 

COSMIC TRASH COLLECTOR 

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I6K Ext. BAS IC requ ired. 
Some games need Joystick. 
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P. 0. Box ¥016 

Cherry Hill, NJ 0803</ 



94 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



Assembly Corner... 



Let's End Those Typing Errors 
Once And For All 



By Dennis S. Lewandowski 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



(Mr. Lewandowski, an experienced assembly language programmer 
and teacher, is president of DSL Computer Products.) 




One of the biggest problems that face people who try to 
type in Basic language programs is the infamous ? SN 
ERROR. Good old ? SN ERROR occurs when you type in 
PRENTfor PR1 NTot any of a number of other such things 
that make command words into something they are not. 

Hey, let's face it. Typing these things in isn't exactly the 
easiest thing in the world! You are often confronted with a 
whole bunch of lines of code that simply boggle the mind. 
Typing these lines is slow and tedious. And the possibility 
for error is great. 

And, who among us hasn't finished typing in a long, long 
listing of something we really wanted and then found out 
that it wouldn't run. Usually it's our fault! We just missed a 
line, typed a FUR for a FOR or, after answering the phone, 
forgot that there was an ELSE A-33 at the end of the line 
and just went on along. 

I really wanted to give all of you a little Christmas present, 
but got all wound up in the graphics game we were 
constructing for last month. So, for January now, let's take a 
little time out to present this little utility, RBOWCHEK, 
that should solve a lot of your typing problems. 

RBOWCHEK works on a principle called a Checksum 
that actually counts the number of characters in a Basic 
program. Because of the way Basic works, it does not 
actually count all the characters. Let me explain. 

First of all, your CoCo pads in three zeros into a Basic 
program to help the Basic interpreter locate the start and 
end point. Two of those zeroes are counted by the 
Checksum, so they are also counted by RBOWCHEK. All 
that means is that if your computer is "empty" — doesn't 
have any program in it — you will get a reading of 2. That is 
because two of the zeroes are counted. It's not to worry. 

Second, Basic tokenizes its command words. So, no 
matter how longtheyare, they count the same. After loading 
in RBOWCHEK, try typing in the following: 

1 PRINT "HELLO" 

Press the down arrow, and you will see the figure 0010 at 
the top left-hand corner of the screen. Now, just type in a 1 to 
clear out the line and type this line: 

1 IF "HELLO" 

Yes, I know this line doesn't makeany sense, but press the 
down arrow anyway. As you will see, the same figure, 0020 
appears again (or does not change) in the upper left-hand 
corner of the screen. 

This is because Basic reads its tokens as essentially the 
same. Although IF is three letters shorter than PRINT, it is 
still read as the same. 

How To Use RBOWCHEK 

There are two versions of RBOWCHEK listed with this 
article. The first is a machine language program which you 
can directly type in and assemble with an editor/ assembler. 



The second is a Basic program which will POKE the 
machine code into memory. 

Note Line 2 in the Assembly Language listing. It sets the 
origin to $3FB0. That is for 16K machines. Those of you 
with 32K should change this origin to S7FB0. 

The Basic program works a little easier. It reserves 
memory, checks for 16K or 32K (sorry, no 4K version) in 
Line 10. Line 20 clears memory for the routine (since 
executing a CLEAR resets all variables, Line 30 just repeats 
Line 10. 

The Basic program is also built to trap errors by setting up 
its own error trappingf or Checksum mistakes on the DA TA 
statements. So, if you mistype one of the DA TA statements, 
Line 70 should catch it. 

The program is position independent, which means it can 
be loaded anywhere in memory. Before the Machine 
Language version of the program is loaded, you must 
CLEAR 25, 16303 for 16K or CLEAR 25, 32687 for 32K. 

EXECule the program. Now, all you need to do is press 
the down arrow and the Checksum for your Basic program 
is shown on the screen. 

This Checksum from RBOWCHEK is shown in 
hexadecimal numbers. To convert to decimal (if you wish 
to), just type in PRINT &Htttttttt. The screen will display the 
decimal equivalent of the hexadecimal number. 

It is a good idea to NEW the Basic program out of 
memory at this point. Then start typing the program you 
want to load into memory. At the end of any line, simply 
press the down arrow and the Checksum for that program 
will appear on the screen. 

Now The Good News 

The good news is really good — a nice way to start out the 
year. 

Beginning this month, all Basic programs of any size 
published in the Rainbow will have a count from 
RBOWCHEK published with them. Longer programs will 
have a couple of "benchmarks" so that you can check your 
progress along the way. 

If you get a number different than the RAINBOW 
CHEK™ (a Trademark of Falsoft, Inc.), you will know you 
have made a typing error. Because the longer programs will 
have several RAINBOW CHEKpoints, you will be able to 
spot your errors more easily and quickly. 

Now, a few hints: 

1. Spaces count as a character, so be sure you follow 
the listings exactly as they appear in the Rainbow. All 
listings, as you know, are formatted to 32 characters, to 
match the CoCo screen. 

2. This program will not distinguish between incorrect 
command words. So, if you mistype PAINT rather than 
PRINT, the RAINBOW CHEK will not alert you to the 
error. 

3. By the same token (pardon the pun), if you mistype a 
variable there is no way for RBOWCHEK to catch it — 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 95 



unless you type the variable A as A A. But, RBOWCHEK 
reads only the characters — it has no way to evaluate the 
letters. 

Even with these three exceptions, RBOWCHEK should 
be a great help to you in typing in programs from the 
Rainbow. And, please note that while this program is 
copyrighted by the Rainbow, it is available to any other 
publication or program author simply by written 
permission. 

We hope others will adopt this system, too, to make it 
easier to type in programs. Those wishing to use it need only 
write to the RAINBOW. Copyright and trademark 
identification should accompany any use. Please write 
Lonnie Falk, the editor of this magazine, for details. 

So, we hope you will feel that incorporation of this little 
goodie is more than worth a slight departure from the 
Assembly Corner. We'll be back on track next month and 
we're looking forward to a lot of good offerings in 1983. 
Hope you'll be with us! 

The Listings: 

RBOWCHEK 
Assembly Language Listing 

NAM RBOWCHEK 



0003 3FB0 B6016A 

0004 3FB3 A78D0044 

0005 3FB7 867E 

0006 3FB9 B7016A 

0007 3FBC BE016B 



START 



ORB $3FB0 
LDA $016A 
STA RETURN,PCR 
LDA #$7E 
STA $016A 
LDX $016B 



$7FB0 FOR 32K 



0008 3FBF AF8D0039 


VAR 


SH RETURN*!, 


PCR 


0009 3FC3 308D0004 




LEAX CHECK, PCR 


0010 3FC7 BF016B 




STX $016B 




0011 3FCA 39 




RTS 


BACK 


0012 3FCB 810A 


CHECK 


CMPA #$0A 


DOWN ARM KEY 


0013 3FCD 262C 




BNE RETURN 


NOT PRESSED 


0014 3FCF 3416 




PSHS X,D 


SAVE RESISTERS 


0015 3FD1 DCIB 




LDD ($1B 


TOP OF PRGM 


0016 3FD3 9319 




SUBD <$19 


START OF PRGM 


0017 3FD5 mm 




LDX #$400 


START OF SCREEN 


0018 3FD8 8D06 




BSR HEXOUT 


DISPLAY RESULT 


0019 3FDA 1F98 




TFR B,A 


PUT B INTO A 


0020 3FDC 8D02 




BSR HEXOUT 


DISPLAY RESULT 


0021 3FDE 2019 




BRA OUT 


FINISHED 


0022 3FE0 3402 


HEXOUT 


PSHS A 


SAVE CONTENTS 


0023 3FE2 44 




LSRA 


TURN BYTE INTO 


0024 3FE3 44 




LSRA 


NIBBLE 


0025 3FE4 44 




LSRA 


U tl 


0026 3FE5 44 




LSRA 


U 11 


0027 3FE6 8D04 




BSR 0UTA1 


SCREEN CORRECT 


0028 3FEB 3502 




PULS A 


RESTORE CONTENTS 


0029 3FEA 840F 




ANDA #$0F 


STRIP MSN 


0030 3FEC 8109 


0UTA1 


CMPA #$09 


9 OR MORE? 


0031 3FEE 2E04 




BBT AF 


MUST BE A-F 


0032 3FF0 8B70 




ADDA #$70 


MUST BE 9 OR < 


0033 3FF2 2002 




BRA OX 


SKIP ALPHA 


0034 3FF4 8B37 


AF 


ADDA #$37 


ALPHA OFFSET 


0035 3FF6 A780 


OX 


STA ,X+ 


PRINT NUMBER 



n^Dss 





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Ontario residents add 7% sales tax 



96 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



JARB 



SOFTWARE 
HARDWARE 



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MANSION OF DOOM 

by PAL Creations 

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by Bill & Debbie Cook 

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16KEXT $14.95 



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32K EXT Both for $ 14.95 

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by Faith Robinson Enterprises 

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DOODLE BUG 

by Computerware 

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COLORPEDE 

by Intracolor 

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Dealer/ Author Inquiries Invited 



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add 6^« saies tax. 



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16K Ext Both for $15.95 



SCORE-EZ 

From 1 to 6 people can play this excellent 
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C.O.D. ORDERS ACCEPTED 

NO CREDIT CARD ORDERS 



003^ 3FFC 0300 


FOB * 


5"GRE ADRS HERE 


m% 3FFE 


END START 




0036 3FF9 39 


PIS 


RETURN FROM SUB 


0037 3FF9 3516 


GUT PUIS X.D 


RESTORE RESS 


0038 3FFB 7E 


RETURN FCB $?E 

RBOWCHEK 
Basic Listing 


JUMP OPCODE 



180 DATA 15,129,9,46,4,139,112 
190 DATA 32,2,139,55,167,128,57 
200 DATA 53,22,126,0.0 



10 CLS: IFPEEK( 116) =127 THEN X=32 

688 ELSE X- 16304 

20 CLEAR25, X-l 

30 IFPEEK(il6)=12 7 THENX =32688 E 

LSE X=16304 

40 FORZ=-X TO X+7 7 

50 ready: w=w+y: PR int z , v : w 

60 POKE Z, Y : NEXT 

7r3 IFW«5718 THEN80 ELSE PR I NT "DA 

TA ERROR" : STOP 

80 EXEC X:END 

90 DATA 182,1,106.167,141,0,68 

100 DATA 134,126,183,1,106,190 

110 DATA 1,107,175,141,0,57,48 

120 DATA 141,0,4,191.1,107.57 

130 DATA 129,10,38,44.52,22,220 

140 DATA 27, 147,25, 142,4,0, 141 

150 DATA 6,31,152,141,2,32,25 

160 DATA 52,2,68,68,63,68 

170 DATA 14 1,4,53,2,132 



About Your Subscription 

Your copy of the RAINBO W issent third class mail 
and, for subscribers in the United States, the date of 
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You must notify us of a new address when you 
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This applies to everyone except those whose 
subscriptions are through our distributor in Australia. 



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A SIMPLE TO USE PROGRAM FOR YOUR COLOR COMPUTER 



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RAINBOW 



98 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



BASIC AID 



AT LAST! Help for the BASIC programmer. BASIC AID is an indespensable addition to the Color 

Computer. It will save you valuable time and effort. If you write or modify BASIC programs, 

you need BASIC AID. 

You get 43 Common BASIC commands available as single Control Key inputs. Greatly 

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Redefine any or all keys! Put in your most 
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MERGE MOVE ON/OFF 



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93-15 86th DRIVE 
WOODHAVEN, NY. 11421 



(212)441-2807 (VOICE) 
(212) 441 3755 (DATA) 



Check Out Our Color BBS' At (212) 441-3755 & 1212) 441-3766 24 Hours Every Day ^ 

DEALER/CLUB INQUIRIES WELCOME «= 



New York State Resident* add appropriate taxes 



Tired of plugging and unplugging 
devices from the RS232 port of your Color 
Computer? Make your life easier. Buy our 
RS232 expansion cable and connect two 
devices at the same time. Just right for 
printers, modems, etc. Anything that plugs 
into the Color Computer will plug into this 
high quality cable. 

RS232 Cable $20.00 



COLORCOM/E BONUS! Order 
COLORCOM/E and get the RS232 cable 
for only $15.00. Save $5.00 

32K RAM Button $2.99 

Nanos System Reference Card . $3.99 

16K Chips $16.00/set 

64K Chips $64.00/set 




Basic ROM 1.1 
6821 (PIA) Chip _ 
6847 (VDG) Chip. 



6883 (SAM) Chip with heat sink _ 

6809E 

CoCo First Aid Kit (Be Prepared) 
(2 682 1's, 6809E, & 6883) 



_$36.00 
_$9.95 
_$17.95 
_$29.95 
_ $29.95 



Color Computer Tech Manual 

"Color Computer Secrets Revealed" 

Parallel Printer Interface (Serial I/O Port) 
CoCo Cooler (Internal Cooling System) 

The Extension Interface 

Extended Basic ROM Kit 

Color BBS Software 



RS Disk Interface (with manual) 

64K Color Computer w/Extended Basic 



$7.95 

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STINGER IS HERE! The ultimate maze game. 
Cassette $24.95 Disk $29.95 ROMPak $34.95 



SMART TERMINAL PACKAGE 



WE DIDN'T WAIT for the competition to catch up with us! We've added even MORE 
features to COLORCOM/E, our superb Smart Terminal program for the Color 
Computer. Compare before you buy. NOBODY offers you more! 



Complete Upload and Download Support * 

Online Cassette/Disk Reads and Writes * 

110, 300, 600, or 1200 Baud • 

Full or Half Duplex • 

Preenter Data Before Calling (Saves $$'s) * 

Offline and Online Scrolling * 



Automatic Capture of Files 

Send All 127 ASCII Characters From Keyboard 

Word Mode Eliminates split Words 

7 or 8 Data Bits (Including Graphics Support) 

Efficient Data Storage S-t-r-e-t-c-h-e-s Memory 

ROM Pack or Disk 



COLORCOM/E $49.95 

AND, our efficient storage and easy editing of received data 
makes printing to your printer offline a snap. Select any portion of /5$\ 
the received data for printing. No need to print everything. /LsoS 



Add $2 for Shipping and Handling 



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TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

'Donkey King _ 

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'Protectors 



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" Requires 32K 



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93-15 66th DRIVE 
WOOOHAVEN, N.V. 11421 



(212)441 -2807 (VOJCE) 
(212) 441-3756 (DATA) 



Color Haywire 

Space Raider's 

ILLUSTRATED MEMORY BANKS 

Star-Trench Warfare $18,95 

LARRY BANKS SOFTWARE 

64K Disk Utility Package S21.95 



Check Out Our Color BBS' At (212) 441-3755 _ (212) 441-3766 24 Hours Every Day 

DEALER/CLUB INQUIRIES WELCOME 

New York State Residents add appropriate taxes 



PERSONALITY 



ADVERTISMENT 



Build a better bulletin board and the world will beat a path to your door. 

Bob Rosen— 

A Colorful Success Story 



Reprinted with permission of 80 Micro, © 1982 



by Kerry Leichtman 
80 Micro Staff 



When forming an opinion of the Color 
Computer's success, it would be best 
to consider the story of Bob Rosen. Bob's 
claim toColorComputer fame is his bulletin 
board — Connection-80 of Woodhaven, NY. 
It is the only bulletin board exclusively serv- 
ing the Color Computer. 

It didn't start out that way. Bobbegan his 
bulletin board in March of 1981 on a Model I 
providing information on TRS-80 Models I 
and III. Then he bought a Color Computer. 
Bob's fascination with the Color Computer 
is similar to that of many other computer- 
ists. He was amazed by its power, ease and 
versatility. 

"I was kind of surprised there was no sup- 
port from Radio Shack — very little, like the 
Pocket Computer," Bob told 80 Micro. "I 
started putting things on about the Color 
Computer and all of a sudden I was getting 
a lot of out-of-state calls. 

"It just mushroomed; it's amazing. I can 
be here any time of the day and get a call 
from just about anywhere. I've gotten calls 
from England, Israel, Alaska, Puerto Rico, 
Canada, Mexico, Switzerland and all over 
the United States. 

Bob was a Radio Shack employee for 
seven and a half years. He enjoyed working 
for Radio Shack and. apparently, Radio 
Shack liked employing Bob. For four 
straight years, as a retail salesman, he was 
their area's number one man behind the 
counter in total sales. Is running a bul- 
letin board a profitable business 9 To leave 



behind the salary a number one salesman 
earns should lead to some positive conclu- 
sions. 

To be a good salesman you have to be- 
lieve in what you are selling. Bob was oneof 
the first, if not the very first, New Yorker to 
buy a Model I TRS-80. His sales receipt is 
dated August 5. 1977. At the time he wasat- 
tending New York City Community College 
as an electrical technology major. 

"I was always fascinated by computers. 
One thing led to another. I met a gentleman 
by the name of Tom Vande-Stouwe of B.T. 
Enterprises at a computer user's group. 
He started what I believe was the first bul- 
letin board service in the New York City 
area. He told me all you need is a Model I, 
two disk drives, an auto-answer modem 
and a software package. So I bought the 
package and set up my Model I. At the 
time it was mainly a hobby." 

The package is called Message 80, writ- 
ten by Richard Taylor of Programs Unlim- 
ited with enhancements by Vande- 
Stouwe. It consists of a 1K machine-lan- 
guage driver program and a 15K Basic pro- 
gram. The bare-bones system requires a 
32K micro and two disk drives. 

But let's back up a little more, to where 
Bob Rosen and the wonderful world of 
electronics collide. "It's all because of 
Roger Maris and Mickey Mantle," Bob 
confessed. (For the younger hobbyists: 
Maris and Mantle were not Radio Shack 
salesmen. They were the driving forces 
behind an almost unstoppable New York 
Yankee baseball team in the 1960s.) 

"I was a sports fan. I was always a 
Yankee fan. I got intrigued by listening to 
the AM radio at night trying to pick up 
Yankee games when they were on the road. 
I got interested in that and started reading 
articles about short-wave listening. I got in- 



to shortwave DXing, I got my amateu r radio 
license (K82HKO), and that got me into elec- 
tronics." 

Connection-80 has been in existence 
slightly more than one year. Some of its fea- 
tures are electronic mail, bulletins, down- 
loading, a products section a merchandise 
section, user log and chatting with the 
system operator— Bob Posen. "If I'm 
around a caller can chat with me on line. Ac- 
cessing the chat feature sends the control 
G to my MX-80 which sounds a little bell to 
get my attention." 

Connection-80's hardware consists of 
three 80-track, double-headed drives and 
one 40-track, double-headed drive, a 48K 
Model III, an auto-answer modem and an 
MX-80 printer. 

The bulletin board is accessed more tor 
electronic mail than anything else. "What 
happens is a lot of peopie put on fixes, hints 
and general information that they have 
found out for themselves about the Color 
Computer that you can't get anywhere else. 
People go on the board asking for a solu- 
tion to a problem, or something about a 
software bug. 




Bob Rosen— one of the first TRS-80 pur- 
chasers with the Connection-80 hardware. 



ADVERTISMENT 



"What we have here is a central point 
now where people can call in and reason- 
ably get an answer, instead of calling Radio 
Shack's 8Q0 number in Texas and getting, 
'We don't know.'" 

For users accessing Connection-80 for 
help, there is one aspect to Bob's service 
that might remind them of Radio Shack—a 
busy signal. At present Connection-80 can 
only handle one caller at a time. "If I get 40 
callers a day, I might have had 200 attempts 
td get on." Corrective measures are in the 
works. "I have plans to go multi-user in the 
near future Maybe I'll purchase a Model 16. 

"I'm also looking at getting a 10-mega- 
byte hard-disk system with DOSPLUS from 
MTI. The only reason I didn't have one be- 
fore is that there wasn t any software for 
the Model III. Now there is." 

Even with his one-caller-at-a-time limita- 
tion, Connection-80 is enjoying financial 
success and gaining itself a reputation as a 



"When Bob Rosen dreams he sees 

a multi-user bulletin board with a 

toll-free 800 number, no errors and 

no disk or memory crashes. " 



Color Computer resource. "Color Computer 
gurus, such as Alfredo Santos, Cal Rasmus- 
sen, Syd Hahn, Wayne Day and Jorge Mir 
started calling Connection-80 with all kinds 
of Color Computer secrets not yet released 
by Radio Shack. For example, to speed up 
the GPU, all you have to type is a POKE 
65495,0. Or to get 6K more memory, POKE 
25,6 POKE 27,6:POKE 29,6:POKE 31,6." 

To access Bob Rosen and Connection-80 
users need a TRS-80, a full-duplex, 300-baud 
modem and the phone number: (212) 
441-3755. There is no charge, other than 
what Ma Bell requires. To download from 
the system users need a ROM pack called 
ColorCom/E for $49.95. available either 
from Bob or Eigen Systems. 

"If someone calls me from my same area, 
with the same message rate, they could be 
on 10 hours and it would only cost them 
eight cents. That's it." 

Bob. through his company Spectrum Pro- 



jects, runs the bulletin board full time He 
makes his living by mail order selling many 
of the products listed on the board's mer- 
chandising section and by selling advertis- 
ing. Bob gets calls on a daily basis from 
businesses requesting space on Connec- 
tion-80. With all this instantaneous success 
attributable to the Color Computer's popu- 
larity, Bob finds Radio Shack's s!ow-to-sup- 
port attitude puzzling. 

"It's still amazing to me that after all this 
Radio Shack still does not do anything. 
They say it's in the works. I can believe 
some of that, but I can remember waiting 
eight months to get Level II chips when I 
first got my Model I." 

Connection-80's future looks bright. 
When Bob Rosen dreams he sees a multi- 
user bulletin board with a toll-free 800 
number, no errors and no disk or memory 
crashes. And everyone who calls up will be 
able to access it ■ 



COLOR BBS SOFTWARE— Requires 32K CoCo, an Auto-Answer 
Modem and two drives. Become a SYSOP and run your own bulletin 
board service to sell CoCo hardware and software $149.95 

COLORCOM/E— The Smart Terminal program you need to access 

the Rainbow Connection* at (212) 441-3755. ROMPak or 

Disk $49.95 




COMPUTERS 
VIDEO 



SPECTRUM PROJECTS 



93-15 86th DRIVE (212) 441-2807 (VOICE) 

WOODHAVEN, N.Y. 11421 (21 2) 441 -3755 (DATA) 



DC MODEM I-300 baud, Full Duplex Modem $149.95 

Purchase COLORCOM/E with a DC Modem I and get a RS232 
Expansion Cable and Serial Interface Cable FREE!! 



Add $2 for Shipping and Handling 
N.Y. State Residents Add Appropriate Taxes 



'Formerly Connection-80 of Woodhaven 



ffPELCNE 



mistake was ours, not theirs. 



WE DID IT AGAIN, and forgot to 
mention the name of our cover 
photographer/ artist from the 
December issue. Now, let's say that we 
apologize to Craig Hannah of Los 
Angeles for forgetting to give him 
proper credit in the December issue. We 
hope you'll agree with us that Craig's 
picture of CoCo under the Christmas 
tree was a fitting one for our December 
issue. 

But, the Pipeline is supposed to be a 
place for "inside" news, not apologies. 
So, we think the story of how that cover 
came to be might be of interest. Craig 
reports that most of his friends "find me 
a little crazy" because of the time he 
spends with his own CoCo. But, he said, 
the evening he actually took the 
photographs for the cover "it was 101 
degrees in L.A. and no one could figure 
out why I wanted a Christmas tree. 
Then, when I turned up the air 
conditioning full blast and lit a fire in 
the fireplace, they knew there was 
something wrong with me!" 

Never to mind, Craig. It was a 
beautiful cover. 



WE UNDERSTAND THAT the 

earlier models of the TDP-I00 may 
have some problem showing up with 
some of the proper colors in PMODE4. 
This, by the way, only happens when the 
program that is being run uses pseudo- 
colors in PMODE4 — as used by some 
of the high resolution arcade games. 

There's a way to fix it, of course. Ron 
Krebs of Mark Data says that one of the 
ways is to add a 33K one-quarter watt 
five percent resistor between pins 2 and 
12 of IC U6. The IC number is printed 
on the circuit board. 

The other fix is a little more 
complicated. What you need to do is set 
up three components in a line: a 33K 
ohm resistor, a 75 Picofarad resistor 
and a 27 microhenry inductor. These 
should be hooked up between the 
emitter of transistor Q3 and IC U9, pin 
33. 



have a new printer and experience 
trouble. 

SPEAKING OF PRINTERS, Radio 
Shack is out with a new daisy wheel 
model, the DWP-410, that could be 
interfaced with CoCo. This is a big boy, 
$1495 list price, but it offers 300 
characters a minute and a host of other 
features. Of course, being a daisy wheel, 
it prints with letter quality and features 
interchangable print wheels. Too, 
because most of its features are in the 
printer itself, you would only need to 
use character codes (as offered in a great 
many CoCo word processors) to access 
these features. It does require a serial to 
parallel converter to work with CoCo, 
though. 



IS THIS A 'PRINTER 'column this 
month? Maybe so. Because rumor has it 
that there will soon be a "new"family of 
printers from Epson America. Aside 
from Radio Shack, Epson printersseem 
to be the most popular with CoCo 
owners — so this might be interesting 
news for a lot of you. We have not heard 
much about additional features, but we 
suspect increased print speed (from the 
80 characters per second now available) 
would be one of them. 



READERS SHOULD NOTE that 
usually we do not mention other 
products which we have previously 
reviewed when we give the lowdown on 
a product. There would be a lot of space 
problems if we did. The exception to 
this is usually word processing 
programs, which usually refer to one 
another in reviews — primarily because 
of the large number on the market. An 
example of our not making reference, 
however, is last month's takeout on the 
language FORTH, which did not 
mention COLOR FORTH by 
Armadillo International Software. 
That program was reviewed in the 
Rainbow several months ago. 



WITH MORE AND MORE people 
getting into personal computing, there 
will be an ever-increasing need for ways 
to educate them how to use their new 
machines. One answer would be a 
school, such as The CompuServe 
Computer School which has opened in 
Columbus, Ohio, and will open in 
Chicago, Dallas and St. Louis shortly. 

Schools aside, what's the best piece of 
advice you can give a new CoCoist? It is 
to read the manual which comes with 
his machine. We've seen lots and lots of 
"first timer" manuals for computers, 
and there is little doubt that those 
produced by Tandy are the best! The 
problem most people have is 
enthusiasm — they want to rush right to 
the back of the book (or to the 
Rainbow) and start keying in programs. 
Not being familiar with syntax, they can 
make more than the usual number of 
typing errors. And, when the first ? SN 
ERROR shows up, they don't know 
what to do. A healthy dose of the 
excellent Tandy manuals (which come 
with the TDP-I00, too) will cure a lot of 
their problems. 



AND NOW THAT it really is 1983, 
we thought you would be interested to 
know something about our plans for the 
Rainbow. With your support, it will 
continue to grow and provide you with 
ever more information and enjoyment 
for the next 12 months (and the 
foreseeable future). 

We plan more "theme" issues in the 
coming year, but, frankly, our size 
means that we will not have to stint on 
other material as well. While we will 
have some emphasis on specific themes, 
there will also be plenty of this and that 
every month. So, stay tuned. 

By the way, some of our "themes" 
may be a little off the wall, so to speak. 
What we mean is that we view CoCo as 
a special computer and to that end we 
may be a little more free-wheeling with 
themes than some others. We hope 
you'll agree that they will be interesting 
and, in many cases, enjoyable. 



SOME OF THE NEW Radio Shack 
printers, the DMP-I00 and the DMP- 
200, are reported to have a bit of trouble 
when being used with the 1.0 ROMs 
found in earlier versions of CoCo. The 
solution is a simple one: Get the 1.1 
ROM. Radio Shack will replace your 
1.0 ROM with a 1.1 ROM forfree if you 



WE MADE A couple of mistakes in 
prices in the December issue and want 
to set the record straight. It seems some 
little pieces of paper fell off one of the 
ads for Color Software Services and 
messed up the price for their Flipper 
program (really $16.95) and their 
Escape program (really $18.95). The 



Look For 



The. 



/5^v 

RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



104 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

Authorized TDP-100 Dealer 

PRESENTS 
SIX GREAT TDP-100 PACKAGES 



Buy a 16K with regular Basic 
and get two RS joysticks, two 
Spectrum paddles, Super 
Bust-Out ROMPACK, 96 
cassette tape storage 
holder and a year's 
subscription to the Rainbow! 
AS150 Value !!! 



Buy the Color Graphic Printer 
and get five sets of color 
pens, 15 rolls of paper, five 
sets of black pens and a 
four-pin to four-pin serial 
cable. A $60 value !!! 



Buy a Mini-Disk Drive 
system and get 20 diskettes, 
a Disk Drive Extender Cable 
and a three-foot Disk 
Interface extender cable. A 
$125 Value! 



Buy a Line Printer I (DMP-100) 
and get a printer stand with 
shelf, 500 sheets of paper, 
two ribbons and a four pin to 
four pin serial cable. An $80 
value! 



Buy a D.C. Modem I with 
ColorCom/E for $199.95 and 
get an RS232 expansion 
cable and a four pin to four 
pin serial cable. A $25 value !! 



Buy over $100 of ROMPACK 
software and get a three- 
foot ROMPACK extender. A 
$30 value !!! 



SYSTEM 100 COMPUTERS: 

10-1000 16K Basic Personal Computer $379.95 



10-1010 



16K Extended Basic Personal Computer $479.95 



PERIPHERAL EQUIPMENT: 



10-1100 
10-1130 
10-1150 
10-1250 
10-1290 
10-1101 
10-1103 
10-1102 
10-1131 
10-1132 
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10-1200 
10-1210 
10-1251 
10-1252 
10-1270 

SOFTWARE 

10-1300 
10-1301 
10-1302 
10-1303 
10-1304 
10-1305 
10-1306 



Color Graphic Printer I .', $249.00 

Line Printer I $399.00 

Mini-Disk ,.. $CALL$ 

Computer Cassette Recorder $59.95 

Modem I \ $149.00 

Plotter Pens (3 Black) for 10-1100 $2.95 

Plotter Pens (1 ea. Red, Green Blue) for 10-1100 $2.95 

Paper 4% inch (3 rolls) for 10-1 100 $4.95 

Paper 914 inch - Line Printer I (500 sh./unit) $7.95 

Ribbon - Line Printer I $8.95 

Diskette 5 1 /4 inch $3.99 

RS Joystick $12.95 

Computer Dust Cover: $4.95 

Computer Cassette Tape (10 Minute) CT-10 $1.79 

Computer Cassette Tape (20 Minute) CT-20 $3.69 

Cable 4 Pin to 4 Pin $4.95 



Super Bust-Out ..$29.95 10-1307 

Space Assault $29,95 10-1308 

Project Nebula $39,95 10-1309 

Polaris $29,95 10-1310 

Micropainter ....$39,95 10-1311 

Microbes $29.95 10-1312 

Shooting Gallery $29.95 10-1313 



Personal Finance $39.95 

Color File $29.95 

Spectaculator $39.95 

Color Scripsit $39.95 

Learning Lab ...$49.95 

Videotex $29.95 

Chess $39.95 



BUY DIRECT AND GET: 

90 Day Warranty Parts and Service 
52 Nationwide Service Centers 
No Out Of State Sales Tax 
Free Shipping and Handling 



SPECTRUM PROJECTS 

93-15 86th DRIVE 
WOODHAVEN, NY 11421 



UtfiMi 



M 



Graphics.. 



Achieving Motion with PUT and GET 



By Don Unman 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



This is the fourth part of a series of articles on the graphic 
capabilities of Extended Color Basic on the TRS-80 Color 
Computer. Portions of this article are taken from the book 
TRS-80 Color Computer Graphics, copyrighted by Reston 
Publishing Company, Inc. 

The past two articles have discussed methods of "turning 
pages" to achieve the effect of movement of figures on the 
video screen. This time, we'll turn our attention to a different 
technique. The PUT and GET statements of Extended 
Color Basic provide a fast method for moving objects about 
the video display, provided you observe certain limitations. 
The major consideration is the size of the objects to be 
moved. The objects should be kept quite small because of 
the inherent nature of the actions performed by both PUT 
and GET. 

THE THREE ACTS OF PUT AND GET 

First, the objects must be drawn. This may be done on the 
display screen or on a page (or pages) that is not being 
displayed. We will discuss both methods. 

Second, the information used in the drawing is treated as 
a two-dimensional array by the GET statement. The GET 
statement stores this information in an array that has been 
properly dimensioned. 

Third, the PUT statement places the information, 
acquired from the array stored by the G£Tstatement, back 
on the video screen at the specified location. 

We'll go into the details of these three acts with a simple 
example. 

ACT 1 - The Drawing 

In this example, we'll draw a very simple and very small 
airplane which will fly across the screen from left to right. 
We'll represent the ground with some simple line drawings 
that will not move. When we move the plane, we must 
provide some method to erase the previous position of our 
plane. This can be done by choosing appropriate boundaries 
for the array in which the plane is stored. Since the plane will 
move from left to right, we'll include a blank area to the left 
of the plane. 

The ground: 

DRAW "BMI,150;E25R50FI0RI 14EI5R40" 

The plane: 

DRAW "BMI2,10;D2R5FIRIHIR4" 

DRAW "BMI2,I0;FIR7" 

LINE (20,11) -(22,12), PSET 

DRAW "BMI6,II;HIRIFI" 

The screen: 




The plane's array: (8,10) - (22,13). 
(8,10) 



• upper left and 
lower right 
coordinates 



I 



J A\. 



(22,23) 



.blank area to provide erasing 
the previous position 



ACT II - GET 

Since the plane was originally drawn in the screen area 
defined by the coordinates 8,10 and 22,13, the first GET 
statement must specify this area. Each movement in our 
demonstration will be four unites to the right (positive X 
direction). Therefore, each successive GET statement must 
change by four X units. This can be accomplished neatly in a 
FOR-NEXT loop. 

FOR X = 8 TO 22 STEP 4 

GET (X,10)-(X+14,13), A,G 



t. 



L get all details of the array 

we'll assign the variable A 
to the airplane array 



NEXT X 



ACT III - PUT 

In each movement, the plane will be placed four units to 
the right of the positio used in the GET statement. This can 
be accomplished in the same FOR-NEXT loop used to GET 
the plane. 

FOR X = 8 TO 220 STEP 4 
GET(X,10)-(X+14,13), A,G 
PUT (X+4,10)-(X+18,13), A, PSET 

/ t 

/ PSET # all points in array 

the same array as in GET 
NEXT X 

PUTTING IT TOGETHER 

We now have the basic ingredients to write the program 
that will fly the plane. However, we are using an array and 
must dimension the array properly before we can access it. 
There are two ways to do this: 



1) DIM A(14,3) 

2) DIM A(l) 



use a two-dimensional array 
• use a one-dimensional array 



106 the RAINBOW January, 1983 



the parameter (I) is derived from: 

length times width divided by Z, 

where Z = 40 for PMODES 3 and 4 

= 80 for PMODES I and 2 

= 160 for PMODE0 

14*3/40 = 1.05 which rounds off to I 



LOSING BATTLES WITH A 

GLOOMSTICK? 



PUT THE JOY BACK IN 
COLOR COMPUTING 
WITH A NEW 



SPECTRUM 
STICK 

Features include: 

■ Power on/off LED 
indicator 



Ball joint components for 
a true feel of control H 



Extra long cables 
Sturdy construction 



Hair trigger response 



Dealer/Club Inquiries Invited 




"More like arcade joy- 
sticks than anything 
we've yet encountered" 
Rainbow review October 
1982, Page 112 




please send( ) SPECTRUM STICK(s) at 
$39.95 each plus $2.00 shipping to 

name 

| address 

! city,state,zip 



N.Y. Residents Add Appropriate Taxes 



| SPECTRUM PROJECTS 
[93-15 86th DRIVE 
W000HAVEN, N.Y. 11421 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 



We will use the second method since it uses less memory. 
We'll also add a second array (an empty one) to erase the last 
position of the plane. 

FLY BY Program 



100 

110 

120 

130 

140 

150 

160 

170 

5R40" 

180 ' 

190 * 

200 ' 

210 

220 

230 

240 

250 

260 

300 

310 

320 

330 



'DRAW 

DIM A(l), B(l) 

PMODE 4,1: PCLS: SCREEN 1,0 

DRAW"BM12,10;D2R5F1R1H1R4" 

DRAW"BM12,105F1R7" 

LINE (20, 11) -(22, 12),PSET 

DRAWBM16, 115H1R1F1" 

DRAW " BM 1 , 1 50 ; E25R50F 1 0R 1 1 4E 1 

^ —the ground 



1 

:he pli 

J 



H 



fi 



'FLY 

FOR X=8 TO 220 STEP 4 
GET(X,10)-(X+14, 13), A, G 
PUT(X+4, 10)-(X+18, 13) ,A,PSET 
NEXT X 



'BLANK PLANE 

GET (10, 50) " (24, 53) , B, G ^ blank array 

PUT(224, 10)-(238, 13),B,PSET -*-| 

GOTO 330 erases last PUT 




Btmnnm 



Chattanooga Choo Choo Software 




Intellectronics 

Dunkey Munkey (32K) 
$2^5 $22.95 

Mark Data Products 

"Astro Blast, Cave Hunter 

and Color Berserk 

$24.95 



Spectral Associates-Trilogy 

(3 games on 1 tape) 

Ghost Gobbler, Cosmic Invaders and 

SpaceWar 

$5?t4*> 20% off $4795 

others available at 10% off 

b^H ' Planet Invasion and Defense 

$2>05 $19.75 



Prickley-Pear Software 15% oft 

-Viking, Football $1^»S $16.95 
Preread 1,2 and 3 $2>^5 $21.20 



Tom Mix Software 

^e^ *' 'Protectors (32K) $24.95 
Katerpillar Attack $24.95 




"Also available on disk (32K) 
All programs 16K on cassette unless otherwise stated. 

1 983 Video Game Lovers Calandar 

with a different arcade cartoon each month $4.95 

37 Different Games and Adventures Available. 

Send for free complete catalog and descriptions! 

We pay postage within the U.S. - TN residents add 6.25% sales tax 

C.O.D orders add $1.00 

Call Anytime! 



(615)875-8656 

P.O. Box 15892 
Chattanooga, TN 37415 






mm 

ABB. 



SKttttttl 




STORING ON SEPARATE PAGES 

Using PUT and GET directly on the displayed graphics 
pages works fine when the display is small and simple. If you 
have numerous figures and/ or more complex displays, you 
can draw your figures on non-displayed pages. You then 
GET them from the non-displayed pages and PUT them on 
the displayed pages. We'll add to the FLY BY program to 
illustrate this second method. 

The program will start in a similar way. Midway through 
the flight, well drop a parachutist from the plane. There will 
be a free-fall period. Then the chute will open, and the 
chutist will glide to the target area. 

The drawing section of the program becomes: 



100 'DRAW 
110 DIM A(l) 
120 PMODE 4, 
PCLS 

130 DRAW M BM1 
140 DRAW M BM1 
150 LINE(20, 
160 DRAW'BMl 
170 CIRCLE (1 
180 DRAW M BM1 
L1U7E2F1D4L1 
190 CIRCLE (1 
LE(15,50) ,5, 
200 CIRCLEd 
IRCLE(11,50) 
210 CIRCLEd 
220 DRAWBMl 
L1U7E2F1D4L1 
230 LINE(10, 
240 LINE(16, 
250 PAINT (13 
260 PMODE 4, 
270 DRAWBMl 
5R40" 

280 LINE (110 
290 LINE (119 
300 SCREEN 1 
310 FOR W=l 
Four arrays are 



,B(3),C(4),D(4): CLS 
l: PCLS: PMODE 4,5: 

2,10;D2R5F1R1H1R4" I 
2,10;F1R7" plane 

11) -(22, 12),PSET 
6, 115H1R1F1" 
2,23) , 1 
1,29;L1U4E1F2D7L1NU4 



chutist 



3,46) ,3, , 1, .5,0:CIRC 

, 1 , ■ 6j , ■ dj 

3,50) ,5, , 1, -65, -85: C 

, 5 , , 1 , ■ OJ , ■ DJ 

3,56), 1 

2, 625 L1U4E1F2D7L1NU4 



46) -(11, 55) ,PSET 

46) -(15, 55) ,PSET 

,45), 1,1 

1 

, 1505E25R50F10R114E1 



chute and 
chutist 



, 145)-(130, 145) ,PSET 
, 140)-(119, 150) ,PSET 

,0 

TO 500: NEXT W 

used as shown in Figure I: 



land and 
target 



J 



A is the plane as in FLY BY 
B is the chutist before the chute opens 
C is the chute and chutist after the chute opens 
D is the blank array used to erase the chute and the plane 
at the end of the flight 

The plane, the chutist, and the chute and chutist together 
are drawn on pages 5,6,7, and 8. We will GET them from 
there. The land and the target are drawn on pages 1 ,2,3, and 
4. The screen display (land and target only) are turned on at 
line 300. 



(8,10) 

r- 



::_^e* 



A moves right to left, 
blank area on the left 



(22,23) 



108 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



**NEW** ADVANCED 
**NEW** ADVANCED 
**NEW** ADVANCED 




STAR*TRENCH 

Even if you've tried our short sasple version of this game, 
you will have to cm this advanced, highly graphic version 
of STAR*TOCH WARFARE. This High-Res Color 6a* has the 
iost elaborate graphics of any Color Computer Bare created 
to date. We thought it would take 32K to give you the 
detail of this dazzling simulation, but we've actually 
craned it into 16K and added the iost remarkable speed and 
flicker free animation found in ANY Extended asic program. 
(You will not believe this program is really in asici plus 
you can always list our prwai to learn the programming 
techniques that make our software stand out from ALL the 
other basic programs available.) 
ADVANCED STAR*TiENCH WARFARE includes a moving trench, 
cockpit perspective, on screen rapid scoring, energy and 
ship gauges, automatic high score tally, joystick control, 
and a recharge and crash sequence you'll have to see to 
believe. Pop on a pair of 3D glasses and WOW!!!, your Color 
Computer will jump to life with an even greater sense of 
depth with 3D-Iike color graphics. (3D glasses are not 
included, and are not required for you to enjoy this fine 
game.) You'll surely want this remarkable game as part of 
your software collection. Buy it and you'll see that color 
software doesn't have to be Machine Language to be the 
best!!!!! 

ii WARFARE 



ADVANCED STAR*TRENCH WARFARE AVAILABLE AS 
****16K EXTENDED BASIC GAME ON CASSETTE *1B. 95**** 
=====================OLSD TRY 



WORDCCDNE 




Color Word Clone makes word processing simple. This program can be used with 
tape or disk and provides you with real UPPER and LO WER CASE letters with 
descenders. PLUS ... 50 letters by 23 lines on the screen at one time! Why pay more 
when this is all you need? JUST SI 8.95 supplied on tape (minimum system 16K 
Extended Basic). USER MODIFIABLE! ! ! ! 

16K Extended Color Basic Tape Programs 

CREATAVADER — Create your own targets or choose from a menu of 
predesignated four-color targets. 

GA TOR ZONE — Battle against alien "preppy gators" before they eat your 
shirt! An 1MB original. 

KOSMIC KAMIKAZE — Our best-selling high-res, deep space arcade game 
which the RAINBOW called "...the best spaceship graphics we have seen in a 
non-machine language program." 

MANY MORE TITLES available, including STAR SIEGE PLUS, GAL- 
LOPING GAMBLERS, SELECT -A -GAME, STARBASE ATTACK, 
METEOR STORM, plus new releases coming. 

illustrated memory banks 

P.O.BOX 289 

WILLIAMSTOWN, MA. 01267-0289 
VISA AND MASTERCARD ACCEPTED 
CALL (413) 663-9648 3-7 P.M. EST 

SPECIAL OFFER: Merit ion this magazine ad and select 
s FREE prooram for every two programs you order- • ! 





RAINBOW 



(10,18) 



r% 



(14,33) 




B moves downward, 
blank area above figure 



C moves downward, 
blank area above figure 



(16,66) 



450 PUT(X, 10)-(X+14, 13),A,PSET J 
460 NEXT X 

Section 3 - Airplane and 'chutist 

500 'PLANE AND FREE-FALL 

510 Y=10 

520 FOR X=104 TO 160 STEP 4 

530 PMODE 4,5 "1 

540 GET(8,10)-(22,13),A,G GET from "^j 5 " 8 

550 GETU0, 18)-(14,33),B,G J 

560 PMODE 4,13 SCREEN 1,0 m ™> A ™ y l * 

570 PUT(X, 10)-(X+14, 13) ,A,PSET I 

580 PUT(116,Y+2)-(120,Y+27) ,B,PS J 

ET 

590 Y=Y+4 

600 NEXT X 

Section 4 - Airplane and Chute Open 

700 'OPEN CHUTE 

710 Y=58 

720 FOR X = 162 TO 220 STEP 2 *- slower drop 

730 PMODE 4,5 

740 GET(8, 10)-(22, 13) ,A,G 

750 GET (10, 40) -(16, 66) ,C,G 

760 PMODE 4,1: SCREEN 1,0 

770 PUT(X, 10)-(X+14, 13) ,A,PSET 

780 PUT(116,Y+2)-(122,Y+28),C,PS 

ET 

790 Y=Y+2 

800 NEXT X 

Section 5 - End of Flight 
900 'END 

<?10 GET (10, 170) "(22, 182) , D, G^ get blank area 

920 PUT(116, 120)-(122, 132) ,D,PSE 

T -* PUT over chute 

931? PUT(224, 10)-(236, 13),D,PSET «n 

940 GOTO 940 PUT over plane 



Section 2 - Airplane Only 

400 'AIRPLANE ALONE 

410 FOR X=8 TO 100 STEP 4 

420 PMODE 4,5 

430 GET(8, 10)-(22, 13) ,A,G 

440 PMODE 4,1: SCREEN 1,0 



GET from pp. 5, 6. 7. 8 

J 

PUT onto pp. 1.2,3.4 
with display on 



SUPER GAME VALUE 
TWO GAME CASSETTE FOR ONLY $6.95 



***** COAL BINE ADYENTl r R£ ***** 

EXPLORE AN ABANDONED COAL MINE WITH 2k ROOMS OP TREASURE 
AND DANGER. THE LONGER YOU SURVIVE THE HIGHER YOUR SCORE. 
A GREAT BEGINNERS ADVENTURE. 16K EXTENDED BASIC REQ. 



BLOCK- MAN ***** 
COLOR BASIC VERSION OP PAC-MAN LIKE ARCADE GAME. COLOR 
GRAPHICS AND SOUND. PUN POR ALL AGES. JOYSTICK REQUIRED. 



Free U.S. Postage 
Can. #1.00 No COD 
No Charge Cards 



STARSHIP SOFTWARE 
P.O. BOX 776 
ALLENTOWN, PA. 18105 



One last addition is necessary to prepare for the use of all 
eight pages of graphics memory. Add: 

90 GOTO 1000 

« 
■ 

1000 PCLEAR 8: CLEAR 50: GOTO 11 



Cartridge to Tape Back-up 



RELOCATOR makes automatic tape copies of the Color 
Computer cartridges. Allow changes to be made to the 
program such as (Print-out "Videotex, change band rate in 
♦Scripsit, etc.) Requires either 64K mod. or 4 to 8K of 
cartridge memory expansion in the address range of 
&COOO to &DFFF (64K requires some program changes.) 



Requires 16K min 
Cassette $29.00 
plus $1.00 shipping 

•Trademark of Tandy Corp. 



Transition Technology 

1458 W. Birchwood Ave. 

Chicago, IL 60626 



110 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



Education 




Keying Learning to Fun 
-^That's Mathpal's Answer 



by Dave Hooper 'few 

Mathpal is a program designed for children in grades one 
through five. This program brings color, sound, high 
resolution graphics, and fun into the art of learning 
mathematics. The numerals used are bright yellow on a blue 
background, making the visual appearance of the problem 
itself much more attractive than the age-old black-on-green 
style we are used to seeing in this type of program. To break 
the monotony of this type learning process, there is a reward 
given for each problem completed successfully. There is also 
an intermission following the completion of every set of five 
problems, thus giving the student a short break at specified 
intervals. This is a program that combines an arcade-style 
game with a learning experience to produce hours of fun and 
education for your children. 

Key this program into your 80C, then type CLOAD 
"MA THPAL" and hit the ENTER key followed by typing 
RUN and ENTER once again. Following the introduction 
you will find a page of instructions explaining the use of the 
control keys for Mathpal. You may use these keys anytime 
the computer is waiting for an answer to a problem. For 
example, let's say the screen displays the problem " 10 + 4." If 
you would like to see the answer, just press the letter"A"and 
the correct answer will be displayed for a short period of 
time. Then that problem is erased and a new problem 
appears. NOTE: You will not be credited with a correct 
answer in this case. 

The second option you have at this point is to press the "I" 
key, which will display the instruction page for a review of 
the control keys. After you review, press the space bar and 
you will return to your original problem. Please note that 
anytime you return to a problem from the instruction page, 
two zeros appear in the answer block. This brings us to the 
next option. Pressing the "C" key will clear any unwanted 
answer you may have in the answer block. So, Press"C"for 
clear and those zeros will go away. 

If you should decide that the problems you have selected 
are too easy, or too difficult, just press the up-arrow key. 
This will return you to the main menu, where you can re- 
select a grade level consistent with your ability. Each time 
you return to the main menu your total score of correct 
answers is returned to zero, and starts over. Your score will 
continue to accumulate, however, regardless of how many 
times you go to the instruction page. 

The only remaining option is the "E" key, but first let me 
explain how to enter your answers. Your answer must be 
entered from the right to the left, digit by digit. For example, 
let's assume that your answer is 976. First you would press 
the numeral "6" and you would see a "6" displayed in the 1 's 
column. Then press the number "7" to see a "7" displayed in 
the 10's column. Finally you would press the number "9" 
and watch the "9" be displayed in the 100's column. If you 
are satisfied with your answer, press the "E" key to enter 
your answer. You'll know by the sounds and display if your 
answer is correct or not. 

Press the space bar, and progress into the program. 
Displayed before you now is one of two decisions you must 
make. The first is your grade level. The three choices 
determine the degree of difficulty by setting up the top and 
bottom numbers equal to higher or lower variables. Choice 
A sets a variable of RND(IO) for the top and bottom 
numbers of all the problems, except for multiplication 
which is a RND(9) for the top number and one for the 



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bottom. Choice B sets the variables to a RND(50) for the top 
and bottom numbers and a RND(9) for top and bottom 
numbers in multiplication. Finally, choice C produces a 
RND(99) in top and bottom numbers. In mode C, the 
multiplication numbers are RND(99) for the top and 
RND(9) for the bottom. In all three grade levels the top 
number will always be greater than the bottom number in 
the subtraction mode. 

Make your selection of a grade level and press ENTER. 
Then select addition, subtraction, multiplication, or all the 

January, 1983 the RAINBOW 111 



above. Press ENTER once again, and you will be off to a 
world of education through entertainment. 

If you have a 16K machine then you will be interested in 
the following program changes. You will lose the option of 
seeing an instruction page, but you can always refer to this 
issue of theRainbow if you forget. You will also lose the final 
subroutine which simply commends you on your good work 
and then asks you if you want to practice any more. So make 
the following changes and you, too, will be having fun with 
Mathpal. 

DEL 1-2 
DEL 10-12 
DEL 146 
DEL 765 
DEL 3100-3130 
LINE 406 should read: 
LINE 760 should read: 
300 

LINE 665 DELETE THE WORDS: GOSUB 10: 



406 IF TT=15 THEN GOTO 720 
760 SCREEN I,0:PCLS3: GOTO 



*^ 



End 
765 



1 'MATHPAL I 

2 'COPYRIGHT 1982 BY DAVE HOOPER 

9 GOTO500 

10 CLS : PR I NT6489 , " I NSTRUCT I ONS " : 
PR I NT : GOSUB2600 : GOSUB2600 : PR I NT " 

PRESS 'E' TO ENTER YOUR ANSWER" 
IGOSUB2600: PRINT" PRESS *C* TO C 
LEAR YOUR ANSWER" : GOSUB2600 

11 PRINT" PRESS 'A' TO DISPLAY A 



NSWER":GOSUB2600:PRINT" PRESS * A 
' TO RETURN TO MENU" : GOSUB2600: P 
RINT" PRESS *I* TO RETURN HERE": 
PRINT" ENTER ALL ANSWERS FROM RI 
GHT":GOSUB2600: PRINT" TO LEFT":P 
RINT: GOSUB2600: PRINT: GOSUB2600: P 
RINT" PRESS SPACE BAR TO CON 
12 IF PEEK ( 345) =247THENSCREEN 1,0 

:returnelsei2 

21 put(a,b)-(c,d) , j, pset: return 

22 PUT(A,B)-(C,D),A,PSET:RETURN 

23 PUT (A, B) - (C, D) ,B,PSET: RETURN 

24 PUT (A, B) - (C, D) ,C,PSET: RETURN 

25 PUT (A, B) - (C, D) ,D,PSET: RETURN 

26 PUT (A, B) - (C, D) ,E,PSET: RETURN 

27 PUT ( A, B)-(C,D),F,PSET: RETURN 

28 PUT (A, B) - (C, D) ,G,PSET: RETURN 

29 PUT (A, B) - (C, D) ,H,PSET: RETURN 

30 PUT(A,B)-(C,D) , I, PSET: RETURN 
35 PLAY " V3 1 ; T255 ; L255 ; 04CDEFG ABO 
5CDEFGABC" 

40 PUT(0,G)-(24,V) ,M,PSET 

45 G=G-40 : V=V-40 : RETURN 

50 PCLS(3) :G=172:V=192 

55 ZT=INT(TT/10) : Z 1=TT-ZT*10: ZZ* 

= RESTORE 

60 FOR X=l TO 10 
62 READ B* 



Find The 
COLOR COMPUTER INFORMATION 

YOU NEED 

INDEX TO ARTICLES, PROGRAMS, LETTERS 

HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE REVIEWS 

IN MAGAZINES 

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American Library and Information Services 

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Gentlemen: 

□ Yes! Send me COLOR COMPUTER INDEX 1980-1981 at $5 (Canada and Mexico $6) 

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Name 

Address — 

City - - 



/!^\ 



State 



Zip 



112 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



64 IF X=ZT THEN ZZ*=B*+ZZ* 

66 IF X=Z1 OR (X=10 AND Z1=0) TH 

EN ZZ*=ZZ*+B* 

68 NEXT X 

69 DRAW "S45BM 104, 144"+ZZ*: PAINT ( 
118, 146), 2, 2 

70 IF ZT>0 THEN PAINT ( 162, 146) , 2 
,2 

75 DRAW " S4 5 BM72 ,12" +SC*+SD* 

80 F0RH=18T0225STEP16 

85 PUT(H-14,80)-(H+30,96),L,PSET 

:FORX=1TO100: NEXT: PLAY" V3l;L255; 

T2555 01D" 

100 PSET(H-12,96,2) 

105 NEXTH 

1 10 a*="v31 5 t305 04cl2del1cp1cl2d 

el 1 cp 1 l2cdecdecdel 1 cp2 " 

1 1 5 b*= " v3 1 ; t30 ; 04fl2g al 1 fp 1 fl2g 

al 1 fp 1 l2fgafgafgal 1 fp2" 

120 playa*+b*:playa* 

1 25 c*= " v3 1 5 t255 ; l255 ; o 1 cdefgabo 

2cdefgab03cdefgab04cdefgab05cdef 

GAB" 

130 playc*+c*:playc* 

135 RETURN 

137 ON KK GOSUB 21,22,23,24,25,2 

6, 27, 28, 29, 30: RETURN 

140 t=0:x=0:y=0:w=0 

143 IF PEEK(341)=247THENPCLS(3): 
G0T0718 

145 Q*=INKEY*:IF Q*=" "THEN 143 

146 IFPEEK(339)=253THENGOSUB10 

147 IF PEEK(341)=247THENPCLS(3): 
G0T0718 

150 IFQ*= ,, E ,, THENMS=W+<X*10) + <Y*1 

00) : RETURN 

155 IFQ*="C"THENT=3:G0T0175 

157 IFQ*="A"THENGOTO3000 

160 IF T=0 THEN W=VAL <Q*> : A=134: 

B=140:C=162:D=176: IF W=>0 THEN K 

K=W+l: GOSUB 137 

165 IF T=l THEN X=VAL <Q*> : A=90: C 

=118: IF X=>0 THEN KK=X+l: GOSUB 1 

37 

170 IF T=2 THEN Y=VAL <Q*> : A=46:C 

=74: IF Y=>0 THEN KK=Y+l: GOSUB 13 

7 

175 IF T=3 THEN LINE (46, 140) -< 16 

2, 176) , PRESET, BF: W=0: X=0: Y=0: T=0 

: GOTO 145 

180 T=T+l:G0T0145 

200 F0RT=1T07 

205 PLAY " V3 1 ; T255 ; L255 ; O 1 CEGBGEC 

EGBGEC" 

210 NEXT 

215 LINE(46, 140) -( 162, 176) , PRESE 

T,BF: RETURN 

300 TN=RND(TI) :BN=RND(BI) 

302 I FM=2ANDCH*= " A " THENTN=RND ( 9 ) 

: BN= 1 ELSE I FM=2 ANDCH*= " B " THENTN=R 

ND ( 9 ) : BN=RND ( 9 ) ELSE I FM=2 ANDCH*= " 




An exciting new game from 
the company that is setting 
the standards. Colorful, high 
scoring, fast action play with 
arcade quality sound effects. 
High resolution, multicolored 
characters on a black back- 
ground. Smooth accurate joy- 
stick control. Demonstration 
mode. Pause feature. 1 or 2 
players. 100% machine lan- 
guage. Requires 16K color 
computer with joysticks. 



Cassette— $29.95 Disc— $34.95 
Add $1.50 for shipping; $3 outside 
U.S.; 4% tax in Mich. VISA, Master- 
card or Money order. Please allow 2 
weeks for checks. 



DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED. 




January, 1983 the RAINBOW 113 



C " THENTN=RND ( 99 ) : BN=RND ( 9 ) 

305 IF M=l AND TN<BN THEN 300 

306 IF M=2 AND TN<BN THEN 300 

307 IF M=0 THEN S=TN+BN 

308 IF M=l THEN S=TN-BN 
310 IF M=2 THEN S=TN*BN 

315 E=INT(TN/10):F=INT(BN/10) 

320 IF E>0 THEN H= (TN-E*10) ELSEH 

=-1 

325 IF F>0 THEN 1= <BN-F*10> ELSEI 

=-1 

330 IF E<1 THEN A=134: B=28: C=162 

:d=64:kk=tn+i:gosub 137 

335 IF E>0 THENA=90:B=28:C=118:D 

=64 :KK=E+1: GOSUB 137 

340 IF E>0 THEN A=134:C=162 

345 IF H=>0 THEN KK=H+1: GOSUB 13 

7 

350 IF F<1 THEN A=134: B=80: C=162 

: D= 1 1 6 : KK=BN+ 1 : GOSUB 1 37 

355 IF F>0 THEN A=90: B=80: C=l 18: 

D=l 16: KK=F+l: GOSUB 137 

360 IF F>0 THENA=134:C=162 

365 IF I=>0 THEN KK=I+1: GOSUB 13 

7 

370 DRAW"S4;BM46, 123R1 16D1L1 16D1 

R116" 

375 IF M=0 THENDRAW"S8;BM64, 104" 

+P* 

377 IF M=l THEN DRAW " S8 ; BM64, 104 




TEXT PROCESSOR FEATURES 



• Character Fill 

• Programmable Footer 

• Right Justify Line 

• Multiple Footnotes 

• Three Indent Modes 

• Three Programmable Headers 

• Ten Programmable Tab Stops 

• Margin Justification Left and Right 

• Decimal Align, Center, Leftand Right 
Justify On Tab Column 

• Display and Input From Keyboard 

• Change Formatting During Processing 



TEXT EDITOR FEATURES 

• Single Keystroke Edit Command 

• Append Files From Tape Or Disk 

• Fully Integrated Disk FileJHandler 

• Edit Or Process Files Larger 
Than Memory 

• (No Conversion Required) Fully ASC II 
Compatible 

• Full Featured Line Oriented 
Screen Editor 

• Search And Repalce Any 
Character Pattern 

• Copy, Move or Delete Lines 
OrBlocksof Text 

• Edit Basic, Text, Or Assembler Files 



TEXT PRO !! Features Over 70 Connmands In All! 

Key In Format Command Or Text At Runtime! 

Compatible With All Major Printers On The Market! 

Multiple Copy or Repeat All Of Or A Portion Of The Text! 



/^ 



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Add *2.50 Postage 



"+M* 

378 IF M=2 THEN DRAW"S8; BM64, 104 

"+MM* 

380 GOSUB 140 

385 IF MSXS THEN GOSUB 200: GOTO 

380 

390 IF MS=S THEN TT=TT+ 1 : P=P+ 1 : G 

0SUB35: LINE (46, 28) - ( 164, 180) , PRE 

SET,BF 

TO 75STEP5 

THEN GOSUB 50IGOTO4 



395 


FOR LL=5 


400 


IF TT=LL 


06 




404 


NEXTLL 


405 


GOTO300 


406 


IF TT=15 



114 



OR TT=30 OR TT=45 O 
R TT=60 OR TT=75 THEN3100 
407 I FPG*< > " AL " THEN : PCLS ( 3 ) : P=0 : 
GOTO300 

410 IF M=0 THEN M=l : PCLS (3) : P=0: 
GOTO300 

412 IF M=l THEN M=2: PCLS (3) : P=0: 
GOTO300 

413 IF M=2 THEN M=0: PCLS (3) : P=0: 
GOTO300 

415 GOTO300 

500 PCLEAR4 : PM0DE3 , 1 : PCLS ( 3 ) : CLE 
AR300:DIMA<27) ,B(27) ,C(27) ,D(27) 
,E(27),F(27),G(27) ,H(27), I (27) ,J 
(27) ,L(20) ,M(14) 
505 C0L0R2,3 

515 DRAW " S4 ; C2 ; BM40 , 60BD8D3R 1 E 1 R 
3F4R9E4R3F2R 1 U5L3D 1 L 1 1 H 1 U3E 1 R6H3 
L13G2D5G1L1BD5BR2E1R1F1D1G1L1H1U 
1BR20E1R1F1D1G1L1H1U1" 
520 PAINT (48, 64) , 2, 2: GET (24, 60) - 
(68,76),L,G 

525 LINE(76, 108)-(74, 114) ,PSET:L 
INE-(66, 114) ,PSET:LINE-(72, 119) , 
PSET:LINE-(70, 126) ,PSET:LINE-(76 
, 121) ,PSET:LINE-(82, 126) ,pset:li 
NE-(80, 119) ,PSET:LINE-(86, 114) ,P 
SET:LINE-(78, 114) ,PSET:LINE-(76, 
108), PSET: PAINT (76, 118), 2, 2 
530 GET(64,108)-(88, 128) ,M,G 
535 PCLS(3):GOSUB1015:SCREEN1,0 
635 A=18:B=6:N=1 
640 FORX=1TO20 

643 IF X>10 THEN C=A+28: D=B+36: K 
K=N:GOSUB137:GOSUB2600:GOTO655 

644 READ B* 

645 DRAW " S4 ; BM " +STR* ( A ) + " , " +STR* 
(B)+B* 

650 PAINT (A+14,B+2) ,2,2: GOSUB260 



653 ON N GOSUB 670,675,680,685,6 

90,695,700,705,710,715 

655 N=N+l:IF N>10 THEN N=l 

660 A=A+44:IF A=238 THEN A=18:B= 

B+42 

665 nextx:forx=itoi0:screeni,0:g 

OSUB2600 : FORY= 1 TO50 : NEXT Y : SCREEN 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



1 9 1 : GOSUB2600 : FORY= 1 TO50 : NEX TY : N 

EXTX: SCREEN 1 , 0: PCLS3: GOSUB10: GOT 

0720670 GET (18, 6) -(46, 42) , A, G: RE 

TURN 

675 GET(62,6)-(90,42),B,G:RETURN 

680 GET (106, 6) -(134, 42) ,C,G:RETU 

RN 

685 GET (150, 6) -(178, 42) ,D,G:RETU 

RN 

690 GET(194,6)-(222,42),E,G:RETU 

RN 

695 GET(18,48)-(46,84) ,F,G:RETUR 

N 

700 GET(62,48)-(90,84),G,G:RETUR 

N 

705 GET (106, 48) -(134, 84) ,H,G: RET 

URN 

710 GET (150, 48) -(178, 84) , I, G: RET 

URN 

715 GET(194,48)-(222,84), J,G:RET 

URN 

718 TT=0 

720 CLS:PRINT@487, "WHAT GRADE LE 

VEL? " : GOSUB2600 : PR I NT : PR I NT " 

a. GRADE 1 THRU 2": GOSUB2600 
: PRINT: PRINT" b. GRADE 2 
THRU 3" :GOSUB2600: PRINT: PRINT" 

c. GRADE 3 THRU 5":G0SUB26 
00: F0RD=1T04: PRINT: GOSUB2600: NEX 
T 
725 INPUT" ENTER CHOICE N 



OW" 5 CH*: IFCH*=" "THEN725 
735 IFCH*="A"THENTI=10:BI=10ELSE 
IFCH*="B"THENTI=50:BI=50ELSEIFCH 
*= " C " THENT I =99 : B I =99ELSEGOTO720 
740 CLS:PRINT@483, "DO YOU WISH T 
PR ACT I CE : " : GOSUB2600 : PR I NT : PR I 
NT" a. ADDITION" : GOSUB2600 
: PR I NT: PR I NT" b. SUBTRACT I 
ON " : GOSUB2600 : PR I NT : PR I NT " 

c. MULTIPLICATION":GOSUB2600:PR 
I NT: PR I NT" d. ALL THE ABOV 
E" 

743 F0RD=1T03: PRINT: GOSUB2600:NE 
XT:G=172:V=192 

745 INPUT" CHOOSE ONE NOW 

" ; SL*: IFSL*=" "THEN745 
755 IFSL*=' , A' , THENM=0:PG*=' ,,, ELSEI 

FSL*="B"THENM=1 : PG*= ELSEIFSL* 

= " C " THENM=2 : PG*= " " : ELSE I FSL*= " D " 
THENM=0: PG*=" AL"ELSEGOTO740 
760 IFNA*=""THENCLS:PRINT@483, "W 
HAT IS YOUR FIRST NAME?" : F0RLC=1 
TO8:GOSUB2600: PRINT: NEXT: INPUT" 

";na*: ifna*=""THEN760 

765 SCREEN 1,0:GOTO300 

1000 DATA "BR12NR4G4D4R4D24L12D4 

R28U4L12U32BR28" , "BR4NR20G4D4R4E 

4R12F4D4G4L16G4D12F4R24U4L20H4U4 

E4R16E4U12H4BR20" , "BR4NR20G4D4R4 

E4R 1 2F4D4G4L 1 2D4R 1 2F4D4G4L 1 2H4L4 

D4F4R20E4U28H4BR20 " 






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January, 1983 the RAINBOW 115 



1005 DATA "BR12NR8G12D8R16D16R4U 

1 6R8U4L8U 1 6BG4L2G 1 0D2R 1 2U 1 2BU4BR 

28" , "NR28D16R20F4D8G4L20D4R24E4U 

16H4L20U8R24U4BR16" , "BR4NR20G4D2 

8F4R20E4U 1 2H4L 1 6G4BD5D3F4R 1 2E4U3 

H4L 1 2G4BU5U 1 2E4R 1 2F4R4U4H4BR20 " 

1010 DATA "NR28D4R24D32R4U36BR16 

" , "BR4NR20G4D8F4D4G4D8F4R20E4U8H 

4U4E4U8H4BD8H4L 1 2G4D3F4NR 1 2BD6NR 

1 2G4D3F4R 1 2E4U3H4BU6E4U3BU8BR20 " 

, " BR4NR20G4D8F4R20D20R4U32H4BD7D 

2G4L 1 2H4U2E4R 1 2F4BU7BR20 " 

1015 DATA "BR4NR20G4D28F4R20E4U2 

8H4BG4L 1 2G4D20F4R 1 2E4U20H4BR24BU 

4 " : P*= M NU4NL4ND4R4 " : M*= " NL4R4 " : S 

C*= " D8R 1 6D8NL 1 6BU 1 6NL 1 6BR8NR 1 6D 1 

6R 1 6BU 1 6BR8NR 1 6D 1 6R 1 6U 1 6BR8 " 

1 020 SD*= " NR 1 6D8ND8R8NF8R8U8BR8N 

R 1 6D8NR8D8R 16": MM*= " NE4NF4NG4H4 " 

1025 RETURN 

2500 FORX=1TO1000:NEXT 

2505 GOSUB2600 

2510 PCLS( 3): RETURN 

2600 PLAY" V31 5 T2555 L255; 03BF" : RE 

TURN 

3000 a=0:b=0:c=0:d=0:ll=0: j=int< 
s/100) :k=<s-j*100) 

3005 L=INT(K/10) 

3010 IF L>0 THEN LL=<K-L*10> 

3015 IF S<10 THEN A=134: B=140: C= 

162: D= 176: kk=s+i:gosub i 37: goto 



3030 

3020 IF S>9 AND S<100 THEN A=90: 

B=140:C=lia:D=176:KK=L+l:GOSUB 1 

37:A=134:C=162:KK=LL+l:G0SUB 137 

: GOTO3030 

3025 IF S>99 THEN A=46: B=140: C=7 

4:d=176:kk=j+i:gosubi37:a=90:c=i 
18:kk=l+i:gosubi37:a=134:c=162:k 

K=LL+ 1 : GOSUB 1 37 : GOTO3030 
3030 FORT=1TO1500:NEXT:LINE(46,2 
8) - ( 164, 180) , PRESET, BF: GOTO300 
3 1 00 CLS : PR I NTQ484 , N A* " , " : FORLC= 
1T012: GOSUB2600: PRINT: NEXT: PRINT 
@ 129," IT SURE IS GREAT TO SEE YO 

u M :print@161, m are working on: m 

3105 IFSL*="A"THENPRINT@264, "ADD 

I T I ON " ELSE I FSL*= " B " THENPR I NTQ264 

, " SUBTRACT I ON " ELSE I FSL*= " C " THENP 

R I NTQ264 , " MULT I PL I CAT I ON " ELSE I FS 

L*= " D" THENPR I NT@264," ALL YOUR MA 

TH" 

3110 FORSR=1TO3:GOSUB2500:NEXTSR 

: F0RLC=1T015: GOSUB2600: PRINT: NEX 

T 

3115 PRINTQ482, "WOULD YOU LIKE M 

ORE PRACT I CE? " : GOSUB2600 : PR I NT : P 

RINT" SELECT (Y/N)":FOR 

LC=1T04: GOSUB2600: PRINT: NEXT 

3 1 20 QE*= I NKEY* : I FQE^= " " THEN3 1 20 

3125 IFQE*="Y"THEN720 

3130 END 



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Charlie's Machine... 



Speed Up Basic 
With ML Injections 

By Charles J. Roslund 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 



(Mr. Roslund is the author of War Kings and many machine 
language utilities for the 80C.) 

One very good use of machine language programming is 
the incorporation of machine language subroutines in a 
Basic program to gain speed, or to perform a function that 
Basic is not capable of. Once the machine language program 
is written, you must incorporate it into the Basic program. 
There are three methods for accomplishing this. 

The first, and most straight-forward method, is to REA D 
the object (machine language) code from DA TA statements, 
one byte at a time, and POKE it into memory as it is read. 
An example of this method is: 

10 CLEAR 200,15000:' reserve high memory 

20 FOR 1=15000 TO 15005: READ A 

30 POKE I,A: NEXT I 

40 EXEC 15000:' sample call of routine 

50 DATA 134,1,183,5,16,57 
This program will put a machine language program in 
memory and execute it (in line 40). This sample machine 
language program is only six bytes long and all it does is put 
a reverse video "A" near the middle of the screen. The 
SOURCE code for this short machine language program 
looks like: 

8601 LDA #1 

B70510 ST A $0510 

39 RTS 

The main disadvantage to this method of incorporating 
machine language subroutines into Basic programs is the 
tremendous waste of memory. For each byte of object code 
we needed to get into memory, there are several bytes in the 
basic DATA statement plus the memory used by the 
FORI NEXT loop, the READ statement, and the POKE 
statement. Also two variables (I and A) were defined, and 
these each consume seven bytes of memory. If you have lots 
of free memory and can afford this waste, this method is 
perfectly adequate. In many cases, however, you do not 
want to waste memory, and a more memory-efficient 
method of getting the object code into memory is needed. 

The second method, which is much more memory 
efficient (but has a few drawbacks) involves embedding the 
object code into a Basic program line. This is typically 
accomplished by creating a Basic program line that looks 
like this: 

10 ML = PEEK(47)*256 + PEEK(48) + 31 :REM 

***************** 

Locations 47 and 48 contain the address of the beginning of 
the line the Basic interpreter is currently running. In this 
example, they point to the beginning of line 10 at the time 
the PEEK'S are done, and ML is assigned this value + 3 1 . By 
adding 31 to this beginning-of-line pointer we have ML 
pointing to the first "*"i n the R E M at the end of the line. 1 1 is 
important to enter this line exactly as it appears, or the 
number 31 will have to be re-calculated. The next step is to 
locate these *'s in memory and move your machine language 
program into the area where the *'s are located. This can be 
accomplished as follows: 

1. Load a monitor such as MINI-MON (see October 
Rainbow). 

2. Display the memory locations $0019,5001 A. These two 



bytes form an address that points to the beginning of the 
Basic program area in memory. (MINI-MON command D 
0019) 

3. Start displaying memory from the beginning of the 
Basic program area, looking for a series of *'s. The asci value 
of "*"is $2A. Note the address of the beginning of the series 
of *'s. 

4. Put you machine language program into memory, 
starting at the address of the first "*." You could enter the 
object code, one byte at a time, using the monitor. The 
MINI-MON command would be S (address of first"*"). If 
you have a tape or disk copy of the machine language 
program, you can load it into unusued memory and use the 
Block Move function of the monitor to copy the object code 
into this area (MINI-MON command M). 

5. Exit the monitor and you have embedded machine 
language in a Basic program. 

If the first byte of the machine language program is also 
the EXECute address, you may call this machine language 
program by EXEC ML. You may also define a user function 
: DEF USR0=ML. The six-byte program in the first 
example may be embedded for a trial of this method. Note 
that you need to enter at least as many *'s in the REM as you 
have bytes of code to embed. This is one drawback of this 
method, since Basic program lines cannot be longer than 247 
characters. This means you cannot easily embed a machine 
language program of more than about 220 bytes in length. 
Another restriction of this method is that the program you 
embed cannot contain any "0" byte values. This restriction 
stems from the fact that the basic interpreter recognizes a 
zero byte as an end of line marker during one of the routines 
called when a Basic program is loaded from tape or disk. 

After embedding a machine language program with this 
method, the listing will look very strange because of the 
Basic interpreter untokenizing byte values in the REM 
statement when it lists to the screen. One further restriction 
is that you must never EDIT the line with the embedded 
code, or you will destroy the code. This is due to the Basic 
interpreter untokenizing the line when listing it, but not re- 
tokenizing past the REM statement after EDITing. 

The third method I will describe has none of the 
drawbacks of the previously described methods, and I feel it 
is the best technique for embedding machine language in 
Basic programs. I will describe this technique in greater 
detail than the first two methods discussed for this reason. 

The use of this method requires an understanding of a few 
pointers Basic uses in low memory, specifically: 
$0019 & $00 1 A - Beginning of Basic program pointer 
$00 IB & $00 1 C - End of Basic program/ Beginning of 
variable storage area pointer 

The memory between these two pointers is reserved by the 
Basic interpreter for Basic program storage. Also, when you 
CSA VE, or save to cassette or disk, these pointers define the 
memory area that is written to tape or disk. Theidea behind 
this method is quite simple once you know how these 
pointers function. All we need to do is change the pointer at 
$001 B, $001 C to make room for the machine language 
program to be embedded right in the Basic program storage 
area. For example, if we had a six-byte-long machine 
language program to embed, we add six to this pointer. 
Then put the object code to be embedded into this area that 
has been opened up. Your Basic program can find the 
beginning of your machine language program by counting 
back from the modified end of program pointer ($00 IB, 
$001 C) . For this six-byte example you would insert the 
Basic line: 

10 ML=PEEK(&HIB) *256+PEEK(&HIC)-9 
The value of M L will be the address of the beginning of the 



118 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



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embedded machine language program. You may call this 
program, as in the second method described, by EXEC ML 
or DEF USRO^ML. 

As I earlier stated, this method of embedding carries no 
restrictions on program length or non-zero byte values. 
Since the object code is not in a Basic program line, it can be 
as long as desired. The use of zero byte values is allowed 
because the routine mentioned in method two, that is called 
when a Basic program is loaded from tape or disk, stops as 
the true end of the Basic program, as it finds three 
consecutive zero's there. It does not even look at your 
embedded machine language. Another nice feature of this 
method is that the embedded object code is invisible on 
program listings. The listings stop at the three zero's 
defining the true end of the Basic program. 

Following, is a step by step procedure for embedding 
machine language with this method. I will embed the six- 
byte program earlier mentioned as an example. 
STEP 1 — Load the Basic Program you wish to embed a 
machine language program into. My example will be the 
two line program: 

10 ML=PEEK(&HlB)*256+PEEK(&HIC)-9 

20 EXEC ML: REM sample call of machine language 
program 

STEP 2 — Load a monitor (such as MINI-MON, see 
October Rainbow to make the rest of the job much easier. 
Note: Be sure to load the monitor into a memory area that 
will not overwrite your Basic program. High memory 
(Reserved with a CLEAR statement is a safe spot. If you use 
MINI-MON, enter these commands: 

CLEAR 200,&H3D00 (ENTER) 

CLOADM"MINIMON",&H2D00 (ENTER) 

EXEC (ENTER) 
STEP 3 — Using the monitor, examine and record memory 
locations $00 IB and $00 1 C. The original contents of 
locations $00 IB, $00 1 C will be referred to as "original 
address." Treating these two locations as an address, add the 
length of your object code +3 to them. I'll explain these three 
extra bytes later. (Remember this is a 16-bit hexadecimal 
number.) The result of this calculation will be referred to as 
"new-address." If you're not sure about your hexadecimal 
math you may do the following: 

Record the values of locations $00 IB, $00 1C. The MINI- 
MON command is D 001 B (ENTER). This value should be a 
four-digit hexadecimal number (262B was the number on 
my disk Basic computer). 

Exit the monitor, MINI-MON command G. 

In Extended Basic, ENTER the command 
?HEX$(&H262B+6+3) (ENTER). These sample numbers 
would yield the result 2634. 262B should be replaced by the 
"original address" obtained in the previous step. Six is the 
length of our sample program. The number returned will be 
referred to as "new address." 

Enter the monitor again. If using MINI-MON, just 
EXEC (ENTER) 

STEP 4 — Store the "new-address" in location $00 IB, 
$001 C. MINI-MON command is: 

S 001 B (ENTER) 

26 (ENTER) high byte for my example 

34 (ENTER) low byte for my sample numbers 

/ (ENTER) 
STEP 5 — Exit the Monitor and enter the basic command 
CLEAR (ENTER). This is required to move some: other 
Basic pointers that point to array variable storage and start 
of free memory. When the CLEAR statement is executed, 
the Basic interpreter looks at the contents of $001 B, $00 1C 
and modifies these other pointers relative to this one. 
STEP 6— Enter the monitor again {EXEC (ENTER) and 



now we can install our object code beginning at "original 
address." If using MINI-MON, ENTER the following: 

S 262B (ENJER) (original address) for my sample 
numbers 

86 (ENTER) 

01 (ENTER) 

B7 (ENTER) 

05 (ENTER) 

10 (ENTER) 

39 (ENTER) 

00 (ENTER) 

00 (ENTER) 

00 (ENTER) 
I (ENTER) 

At the end of the object code, you must put three zero-byte 
values in memory as shown above. This is required because 
the Basic interpreter wants to see three zero's in memory 
immediately preceding the address $00 1 B, $00 1 C points to. 
STEP 7 — That completes the embedding operation. You 
may now exit the monitor and save a copy of your program 
on tape or disk. You could also try running it, if you're 
brave. Before running the program for the first time, it's 
usually a good idea to add one more Basic line, temporarily: 
15 ?HEX$(ML),HEX$(PEEK(ML)):STOP 
This will display the address you are about to execute, 
followed by its contents. If the content is not the first byte of 
your machine language program, (in this example $86) you 
made a mistake somewhere. In that case you may want to 
examine memory near the address "ML" and see if you can 
find where your machine language program does start. If all 
checks out okay, you may delete this temporary line and run 
the program. 

You may EDIT any lines of the Basic program, or add 
new lines with no adverse effects when using this method for 
embedding machine language. One important note on 
writing machine language programs that will be embedded 
is that you must write position independent code. This is an 
obvious requirement since the object code is being located at 
the end of your Basic program, and this location will change 
if you edit your Basic program. If you are embedding a large 
machine language program, rather than entering it by hand 
as I did in this example, you could do the following: 
LOADM the machine language program into a 
reserved memory area, and, using a block memory move 
command from a monitor (such as MINI-MON), move the 
object code into your basic program. 

CHARLIE METHOD1 

10 CLEAR 200, 15000 

20 FOR 1=15000 TO 15005: READ A 

30 POKE I, A! NEXT I 

40 EXEC 15000 

50 DATA 134,1,183,5,16,57 

CHARLIE METHOD 2 

10 ML=PEEK<47)*256+PEEK<48)+31:R 
EM DATATR0N9** 
20 EXEC ML 

CHARLIE METHOD 3 

10 ML=PEEK<&H1B)*256+PEEK<&H1C>- 

9 

20 EXEC ML 

m 



120 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



Software Review... 

UP-1 Works 
(If You Know How) 

The UP-1 is a Color Basic program designed to allow 
purposeful peeks and pokes into memory. Data or machine 
language instructions can be manipulated in memory and 
stored or retrieved from cassette. The program is also touted 
as a mini word processor and as a potential editor for Basic 
programs. The software consists of nine subprograms 
selected from a main menu. 

Unfortunately, it required considerable effort and repeat 
readings of the supplied documentation to understand the 
purpose of this software. The documentation is not easily 
understandable. Several fairly knowledgeable computerists 
I know were unable to fathom the function of UP-1. 

It was finally determined what UP-1 is all about. Part of 
the problem is that the author makes reference to data 
contained in various memory locations which are different 
for 4K, 16K and disk-based machines. After deciding that 
this program was written for a 4K machine, the pieces fell 
into place. The author mentions correcting bugs in a Basic 
program by scanning memory with UP-1 and then 
POKEing a corrected byte here and there until the program 
functions. At first, I thought why bother with that? Just use 
Basic's £D/Tcommand to do the job. That's when I realized 
the author must be using a 4K machine, no £Z)/Tfunction. 

In summary, I must admit that UP-1 does what it says it 
does, although I found it extremely clumsy to use. I 
personally feel there are better ways of doing word 
processing, and better ways of doing memory PEEKs and 
POKEs. 

(DYNAMIC ELECTRONICS INC, P.O. Box 896, 
Hartselle, AL 35640. $14.95 on tape, $29.95 EPROM.) 

Laurence Preble 



Free Shipping UPS Ground 






Back Issue Availability 




Back copies of many issues of the RAINBOW are still 
available. 

All back issues sell for the single issue cover price — which 
is $2 for copies of numbers 1-8 (through February, 1982), 
$2.50 for numbers 9-14 (through August, 1982) and $2.95 
for numbers greater than 14. In addition, there is a $3.50 
charge per order for postage and handling if sent by United 
Parcel Service and $6 for orders sent U.S. Mail. UPS will 
not deliver to a post office box or to another country. This 
charge applies whether you want one back issue or all of 
them. 

Most back issues are available on white paper in a reprint 
form. All back issues now available (Issues out of print 
include August, September, October and December, 1982) 
would be $31.45, plus shipping and handling — a total of 
$34.95 UPS or $37.45 U.S. Mail. VISA and MasterCard 
accepted. Kentucky residents please add 5 percent state sales 
tax. 

Due to heavy demand, we suggest you order back iss«es 
you want now while supplies last. 

In addition, copies of the cover only of the July, 1982, 
Anniversary Issue are available separately for $1 each, plus 
50 cents snipping and handling. These are suitable for 
framing. 




■j^i^a disk drive for 
/M>ur COCO thats better 
and saves you money!! 

TANDON DISK DRIVES 

TM 100-1 Single Sided $199. 
TM 100-2 Double Sided $299. 
Case A Power Supply $49.95 
2 Drive Cable $24.95 



Serial Printers 

all prices include a serial interface for your Color Computer 

C. Itoh Prowriter $6 19. 

Epson Mx80 $599. 

Epson Mx80F/T $659. 

Okidata 82 $459. 



Verbatim SS/DD Diskettes $25.95box 
set of 8 41 16's $14.95 
Hays Stack Smart Modem $239. 
Kraft Joy Stick $49.95 

Model III 48K 2 Drives $ 1695. 

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COMPUKIT 

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visit our show room at 16206D 
tory Knoll Houston, Texas 

7-6000 




I 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 



121 



Game... 



Running From Ores 
Can Be "Hobbit-Forming 



59 




By David Sweet 




Uifflow 



If you were a Hobbit, wandering through the woods on an 
important Hobbit errand, and suddenly found yourself 
surrounded by (shudder) dreaded ores, what in middle-earth 
would you do? 

Since you have in your possession the magical CoCo (a 
gift from Gandolf, perhaps?) you need only to strike the "N" 



MONEY " 



14 $ 



** OO 

10$ 



fl PROGRAM TO TEACH CHILDREN TO COUNT COINS 



1* 



LEUEL 3 



Cassette $19.95 

TRS-80 Color Computer 

Requires 16K Extended Basic 

Ohio Residents Add 5V2% Sales Tax 'Trademark of Tandy 



APPEALING GRAPHICS. FUN REWARDS AND SOUND 
Used Successfully In Classrooms and In Homes 



ALSO AVAILABLE— CASSETTES 
Clock $24.95 Mathfact 

Add-Carry $19.95 ABC's 

Subtract/Borrow $19.95 Spelling 

Question $19.95 Hangword 



$16.95 
$ 9.95 
$16.95 
$14.95 



WRITE FOR FREE DESCRIPTIVE BROCHURE 

DEALER INQUIRIES WELCOME >»t 

B5 SOFTWARE ™ 

1024 Boinbridge PI. Columbus, OH 43228 

(614) 276-2752 



key to be whisked to safety — at least for the moment. But 
you need to be careful, for stroking the "N-Amulet" only 
works once! 

The object of this engaging game is for the "Hobbit" (the 
player) to escape from the ores, which resemble a popular 
arcade-game character. 

After typing R U N the player will be asked how many ores 
he thinks he can escape from. Pick five this time and hit 
ENTER. The screen will then be cleared and five ores, quite 
a few trees, and a pair of flashing eyes (that's the Hobbit) will 
appear. If you are in a bad position (surrounded by four 
ores, or cornered) you may hit "N"and receive a new screen. 
As we said, you may only do this once, and after you have 
moved you cannot use this option at all. To eliminate the 
ores, you must guide them into the trees. Ores are not very 
intelligent! 

Movement is like this: 



4-* 




*-6 



For example: typing a "2" will move you one position up 
and a "9" will move you one position right and one down. 

A "5" cannot be typed twice in a row. Once you move by 
typing the appropriate number, the ores will begin moving. 
This will continue until all the ores are eliminated or you are 
caught! 

The game includes a three-round scoring system which is 
self-explanatory. 

The listing: 

^ — 



10 PCLEAR 4 

20 GOSUB 1020 

30 'NEW GAME 

40 NR=0:TS=0 

50 PLAY "T302L24GP2403CP24EP24L1 

2GP 1 2L24EP24L3G " 



60 

70 

80 

NO 

90 

100 

110 

120 

130 

140 

150 

160 

170 

1 

180 

190 

200 

90 



'NEW 

CLS 

INPUT 



SCREEN 



"HOW MANY 0RCS<5,25) 



IF N0<5 OR N0>25 THEN 80 
CLS 

PMODE 1,3 
SCREEN 1,0 
NT=0 

FOR 1=1 TO 14: FOR J=l TO 10 
BD ( I , J ) =0 
NEXT J, I 
X=RND ( 14) : Y=RND ( 10) : BD ( X , Y> = 

FOR 1=1 TO NO 

BX ( I ) =RND ( 14) : BY ( I ) =RND ( 10) 

IF BD(BX(I),BY(I) )<>0 THEN 1 



122 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



210 BD(BX(I),BY(I) )=3 
220 NEXT I 
230 FOR 1=1 TO 33 
240 TX=RND(14):TY=RND(10) 
250 IF BD(TX,TY)<>0 THEN 240 
260 BD(TX,TY)=2 
270 NEXT I 
280 'SCREEN 
290 P=0 
300 PMODE 1 , 1 

305 IF CL=0 THEN CL=1 ELSE CL=0 
310 SCREEN 1,CL 
320 PCLS 3 
330 FOR TX=0 TO 15 
340 FOR TY=0 TO 11 

350 ON BD(TX,TY)+1 GOTO 380,380, 
360,370 

360 PUT<TX*16,TY*16)-<TX*16+10,T 
Y*16+10) ,TR:GO TO 380 
370 PUT(TX*16,TY*16)-(TX*16+10,T 
Y*16+10),MN 
380 NEXT TY,TX 

390 PUT<X*16,Y*16)-<X*16+10,Y*16 
+10), HB 

400 FOR 1=1 TO 250IA*=INKEY*: IF 
A*<>"" THEN 430: ELSE NEXTI 
410 PUT(X*16,Y*16)-(X*16+10,Y*16 
+10),HB,NOT 
420 GOTO390 

430 IF A*<>"N" THEN 450 
440 IF NT=0 THEN NT=l:FOR P=l TO 
211 STEP 15: SOUND P, UNEXT P:PM 
ODE 1,3: SCREEN 1 , 1 : GO TO 140 
450 J=VAL<A*> 

460 IF J<1 OR J>9 OR (J=5 AND P= 
5) THEN SOUND 100, 1 : GOTO390 
470 P=J 

480 PUT<X*16,Y*16)-(X*16+10,Y*16 
+10), BL 
490 BD(X,Y)=0 

500 ON J GO TO 510,520,510,540,5 
70, 540, 550, 560, 550 
510 X=X+J-2 
520 Y=Y-1 
530 GO TO 570 
540 X=X+J-5:G0 TO 570 
550 X=X+J-8 
560 Y=Y+1 

570 NT=NT+l:ON BD(X,Y)+1 GOTO 58 
0,580,860,870 

580 BD(X,Y)=l:PUT<X*16,Y*16)-<X* 
16+10, Y*16+10),HB 
590 'THEIR TURN 
600 J=0 

610 FOR 1=1 TO NO 
620 IF BX(I)=0 THEN 830 
630 BD(BX(I),BY(I))=0 
640 XT=BX<I)*16:YT=BY<I)*16 
650 PUT(XT,YT)-(XT+10,YT+10) , BL 
660 IF BX(I)>X THEN BX(I)=BX(D- 
1 



670 

1 

680 

1 

690 

1 

700 

710 

720 

730 

740 

750 

760 

770 

780 

790 



IF BY(I)>Y THEN BY ( I ) =BY ( I ) - 



IF BXdXX THEN BX(I)=BX(I) + 



IF BYdXY THEN BY ( I ) =BY ( I ) + 



XT=BD(BX(I),BY(I))+1 

ON XT GOTO 810,720,820,820 

FOR P=l TO 3 

SCREEN 1,0 

FOR XT=1TO150:NEXT XT 

SCREEN 1 , 1 

FOR XT=1 TO 150: NEXT XT 

NEXT P 

PLAY T* 

PRINT "GUESS WHAT IS FOR DIN 
NER": PRINT "TONIGHT?" 
800 GO TO 880 

810 BD(BX(I),BY(I))=3: J=l:PUT(BX 
<I)*16,BY<I)*16>-<BX<I>*16+10,BY 
<I)*16+10),MN:GO TO 830 
820 BX(I)=0 
830 NEXT I 
840 IF J=l THEN 390 
850 PLAY W*: PR I NT "YOU LUCKY HOB 
BIT!":PRINT "YOU HAVE CLEARED TH 
E FOREST OF ORCS ! " : GO TO 880 
860 PLAY T*:CLS: PR INT "SILLY HOBB 
IT YOU RAN INTO A TREE ! " : GO 
TO 880 
870 PLAY T*:CLS: PRINT" YOU RAN SM 




■a 



PREMIUM SOFTWARE 
FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER 

SISI (16KEXT. BASIC) $9.95 

Sisi the fortune telling computer uses data 
that you input to determine a character 
reading for you. 

COLORHYTHM (16K EXT. BASIC) $9.95 
Plots your biorhythm in hi-res graphics 
for 15 days. 

PRESCHOOL PAK (16K EXT. BASIC) $8.95 
Two preschooler learning drills. Contains 
ALPHABET & COUNTER. Makes use of 
hi-res graphics and sound. The kids think 
it's a game! 

MONEY MINDER II (16K) $14.95 

A cassette based personal finance pro- 
gram. Up to 56 user definable budget 
categories. Printout capability. Menu 
driven— easy to use. 

DISK MONEY MINDER 
(32K plus disk) $19.95 

Similar to MONEY MINDER II but for use 
with disk. Easier and faster to use. 



HARMONYCS 

P O. BOX 1573 
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84110 



/^ 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 123 



ACK DAB INTO AN ORC ! " 

880 PR I NT: PR I NT "SCORE FOR THE RO 

UND: " 

890 NJ=0:FOR 1=1 TO NO: IF BX(I)< 

>0 THEN NJ=NJ+1 

900 NEXT I 

910 print:print using f*;no-nj;: 
print " # of orcs killed" 

920 IF NJ=0 THEN PRINT " 10 PTS 
FOR CLEARING THE FOREST" : RS=10:E 
LSE RS=-5: PRINT " -5 FOR GETTING 

EATEN" 
930 PRINT " " 

940 rs=rs+no-nj: print using f*;r 
s;: pr i nt " total for round" ;nr+1 

950 TS=TS+RS 

960 NR=NR+l:lF NR=3 THEN 990: ELS 

E PRINT "YOUR SCORE SO FAR IS "5 

TS; ". " 

970 PR I NT "HIT ANY KEY TO CONTINU 

E."; 

980 A*=INKEY*:IF A*<>"" THEN 70 

ELSE 980 

990 PRINT "YOUR FINAL SCORE IS " 

5TS5 ". " 

1000 PRINT: PRINT "HIT ANY KEY TO 

PLAY AGAIN. " ; 
1010 A*=INKEY*:IF A*<>"" THEN 40 

ELSE 1010 
1020 F*="###" 




PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 



r\ 



QUALITY PROGRAMS FOR YOUR 80C 

PROGRAMS REQUIRE 16K EXTENDED BASIC FOR 
*>*> „■<-< TAPE, AND 32K DISK UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED. 

Flight 

If you'd like to fly a plane then this is what you've been 
waitingfor. A really good graphicsoriented flight simulator 
in high resolution. Four difficulty levels let you go from 
student level to a difficult instrument-only landing. In front 
of you on the screen are your instruments, and above 
them are two representations of your plane in relation to 
the flight path (top and side views). At the higher levels all 
youhavetogo byaretheinstruments. Canyouputit down 
on the runway to hear the synthesized voice from the 
tower say "perfect landing"? It's tough! You use your 
joystick just like the control stick on a plane, and the action 
is realistic indeed. This program was written by a pro- 
fessional flyer— a pilot for a major United States air carrier, 
and the high standards of professionalism really show. 
Just CLOADM and take to the skies!! Requires 32K 
extended. TAPE is $1 9.95 - DISK is $24.95 /^ 



v 



124 



Your Personal check is welcome - no delay. Include 
$1.50 shipping for each program ordered. (Shipping 
free on $50.00 or largerorders). Az. residents add 4% 
sales tax. Orders shipped within two days. 

Stocked by Quality Dealers, or send order to: 
PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

9822 E. Stella Road 
Tucson, Arizona 85730 
(602)886-1505 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



030 W*="T203L16CP1602L32GP32GP3 
2L8 AGP8L 1 6BP 1 603C " 

040 T*="T5L4FFL8FL4FG+L8GL4GL8F 
L4FL8EL2F" 
050 XT=RND (TIMER) 

060 DIM MN(9,9) ,TR(9,9) ,HB(9,9) 
BL(9,9),BD(15,11) , BX(25) , BY(25) 
070 PMODE 1 , 1 
PCLS 3 
SCREEN 0,1 
COLOR 1,3 



080 
090 
100 
110 
120 
130 
140 
150 
160 
170 
180 
190 
200 
210 
220 
230 
240 
250 
260 
270 
280 
290 
300 
310 
320 
330 
340 
350 



LINE (4,0)-(6,0),PSET 

LINE (2,3)-(8,3) , PSET 

LINE (2, 5) - (8, 5) , PSET 

LINE (2, 7) -(8, 7) , PSET 

LINE (0,9) -(10, 9), PSET 

PSET(4,5,4) 

PSET (9, 5, 4) 

PSET(7,7,4) 

GET(0,0)-(10, 10) ,MN 

PCLS 3 

COLOR 6,3 

LINE(4,0)-(6,0) ,PSET 

LINE(2,2)-(8,2) , PSET 

LINE (2, 4) -(8, 4), PSET 

LINE (2, 6) -(8, 6) , PSET 

FOR Y=8 TO 10 STEP 2 

FOR X=4 TO 6 

PSET(X,Y,4) 

NEXT X,Y 

GET(0,0)-(10, 10) ,TR 

PCLS 3 

GET(0,0)-(10, 10) ,BL 

PSET (4, 4, 4): PSET (8, 4, 4) 

GET(0,0)-(10, 10) ,HB 

FOR 1=0 TO 15:BD(I,0)=2:BD( 



id=2:nexti 



10:bd(0, d=2:bd( 



1,5 



360 FOR 1=1 TO 
5, I)=2:NEXTI 
370 PMODE 1,3 

PCLS 3: COLOR 

SCREEN 1 , 1 

LINE (16,36)-(16, 144), PSET 

LINE (50, 36) -(50, 144), PSET 

LINE (16,90)-(50,90) , PSET 

CIRCLE (78, 124) ,20 

LINE ( 104, 36) - ( 104, 144) , PSET 

CIRCLE (124, 124) ,20 

LINE(150,36)-(150, 144) , PSET 

CIRCLE (170, 124), 20 

LINE(199, 104)-(199, 144) , PSE 



380 
390 
400 
410 
420 
430 
440 
450 
460 
470 
480 



490 LINE (208, 36) -(208, 144) , PSE 

500 LINE ( 190, 70) -(226, 70) , PSET 
510 PUT (194, 88) -(204, 98) , HB 
520 RETURN 




PRODUCTS FOR THE 



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Macro conditional 
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program. It can handle any 
size source input file. 
Radio Shack disk. . .$49.95 
FLEX disk. . .$50.00 




DISK UTILITIES 
with REPAIR 

These time saving programs 
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FIND displays starting, 
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deletes all files per request, 
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RANDOM BASIC 
for FLEX 

Extraordinary file handling 
capabilities make this 
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ISAM, Random, & 
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Flexible user input 
commands and easy output 
formatting. Extended 
variable names. Line editor. 
FLEX disk. . .$75.00 

SCRIBE EDITOR 
for FLEX 

A complete program editor 
for serious programmers. 
Includes find, search, 
change, delete, insert 
commands for characters, 



COLOR ASSEMBLER COLOR MONITOR 




lines, or blocks. Macros and 
merge capabilities. Editor 
files larger than memory. 
Interfaces with text 
processor for word 
processing. Great with our 
Macro Assembler. 
FLEX disk. . .$50.00 

COLOR EDITOR 

This cassette package is 
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program editing. There are 
easy commands for search, 
change, delete, and move, 
copy, insert for single lines 
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letters or programs can be 
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attached to the RS232 port, 
cassette. . .$29.95 



This complete 6809 
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supports all 6809 
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modes along with standard 
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references. Learn assembly 
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cassette. . .$29.95 




PASCAL 

Dynasoft PASCAL makes 
this high level language & 
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programming available to 
small systems. Based on a 
subset of standard 
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but omits floating point 
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interpreter, program editor, 
supervisor, sample 
programs, & 2 manuals, 
cassette. . .$49.95 
disk. . .$59.95 



DIAGNOSTICS 

Check the six major 
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FOXYGRAF 

A complete graphics 
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programmer. The very 
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covers the history of 
graphics, how the Color 
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details Radio Shack & 
Motorola would not tell. 
You can program with any 
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combination. Foxygraf is 
relocatable & includes 
callable routines, 
cassette. . .$29.95 
disk. . .$34.95 



TO ORDER: 

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air/Canada. Visa 
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accepted. 



Dealer Inquires Invited 




COMPUTERWARE 



Computerware is a trademark of Computerware. 



call or write 

® Box 668 

Encinitas, Ca. 92024 
(714) 436-3512 



—And Access The Gold 



By M.P. Wilson 



A Raind ex-created index 
to the Rainbow's first nine 
issues can be found on page 
184. 




16K 
ECB J 



JVly feelings upon reading my first copy of the Rainbow 
must have been similar to that of many first-time readers: I 
could not wait to get the back issues and have a full file of 
Color Computer information at my fingertips. A quick 
phone call to the friendly Rainbow staff got me the whole 
stack in just four days. 

I sat down to read and take notes, but by the time I got to 
Issue No. 10, 1 recognized that my pad and paper just could 
not keep up with the information I was trying to trace and 
sort out. I skimmed through some of the later issues and 
found no annual index. Thus, I wrote RAINDEX, an 
indexing, alphabetizing, note-ordering program that can be 
used to salt away a file of references for later use. 

RAINDEX could be used by anyone who needs to list 
notes alphabetically — and the features in the program can 
be employed in many different ways. For instance, if you 
look at the output listing, you will see letters in brackets 
attached to the numbers. These represent the kind of article 
referred to in the index, but when the Rainbow isn't peeking, 
I use that "tag" to identify the different magazines in which 
I've found articles, rather than the type of article. But we 
ought to look at the program to first find out what it does, 
before we start searching out novel ways to use RAINDEX! 

The program begins by CLE A Ring a lot of string space. 
As I only began programming this past summer, I am not 
sure if the CLEAR has to be so big, but it does work. 

While the array DIM'ed in Line 20 looks as though it has 
25 by 100 elements, the Color Computer (I found out 
through a typing error) actually sets up an array that is one 
dimension bigger in each direction than was asked for. In 
this case, the array is actually 26 by 101 elements: the first 
element being a$(0,0), the last a$(0,100). Anyway, I wanted 
to save memory space, so I was delighted to learn that I 
could stuff 26 letters in 25x array. 

The last part of Line 20 puts a "top of the file" marker in to 
tell the program when it has reached the end of a particular 
file. In this case, they are three up-arrows. 

Line 30 gives the first prompt by asking for the Issue and 
Date. I used LINE INPUT so that I could include 
Punctuation. You might like to change this statement to 
match your particular note-taking needs. 

Line 40 gives another prompt; this time asking for the 
"tag." The "tag" is a one-letter indicator note I can tag onto 
the page numbers to tell me what kind of article I am 
referring to. For instance, (R) means a review; (1), a letter; 
(P) a program; and (C) a correction. As I said above, if I 
were indexing more than one magazine or book at a time, I 
might use the "tag" to tell me which book or magazine the 
article came from. That is, under those circumstances, (R) 
might mean Rainbow, (C) Color Computer News, and (B) 
BYTE. You could use the tag anyway you wanted to. 



The next and most important prompt occurs on Line 80. 
The "descriptor" is the word that the program files the note 
under. Only words can be used; startingyourdescriptorwith 
a number, or some other character, will get you a bad input 
message and prompt you for a better descriptor. 

From here on, the program has lots of bells and whistles 
designed to make the filing of notes easier. After a good 
descriptor is entered, the program alphabetizes it, shows you 
a set of prompts, and lists the descriptors that come before 
and after your new one in the files. 

The prompts at the top of the screen indicate that the up- 
and down-arrows will move you through the part of the 
alphabet that your descriptor was filed in. To return to 
where your descriptor is supposed to file after using the 
arrows, simply input a "-"; I especially like that feature, as I 
have a very hard time putting things back in alphabetical 
order. 

If you decide that you don't want to file the note you have 
created, inputting a "?" cancels the whole thing and puts you 
back at the note inputting stage. Or, if you like the note, but 
decide after flipping through the file with the arrows that 
you should have used a different descriptor, the "/ " input at 
this point will prompt you for a new descriptor, thenrefileit 
for you. 

To actually put something in the file (so far we have only 
been seeing where in the file our note would go) input a "@." 
I decided to use the "@" instead of a simple ENTER because 
I kept butterfingering the wrong notes into the file. 

Speaking of wrong notes, if you do enter something into 
the file tht you don't want there, just enter an "V'You will 
be asked for a "D" and a "Q." These are the numbers to the 
left of the notes bracketing the current one: "D" is the first 
one and "Q" the second. The program will remove the note 
with those identifying numbers and return you to the note- 
taking point. Notice that there are no numbers next to the 
note you are trying to insert: that's because it's not yet in the 
file and you can't delete it. It's just not there! 

Finally, the occasion might arise where you know you 
used a descriptor, but just can't remember how to spell it 
(you might have said "GAMES"instead of "GAME."If you 
leave the note and tag prompts blank (just hit ENTER) and 
put "g" (or whatever letter you want to look under) in the 
descriptor; you will now be able to flip through all the entries 
in the file under "g" (or whatever) by using the up- and 
down-arrows. 

The program, by printing each note out as it is entered, 
permits you to also leaf through the printout to find the term 
you are looking for. I find both methods equally useful 
under different circumstances. 

By the way, the program will tack notes together that have 
been filed under the same descriptor. If you were trying to 



126 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



A\ 





NEW 

for your 
COLOR 
COMPUTER 



Release the potential 

of your Color Computer. . . 

Use up to 5 compatible Color Computer cartridges at the same 
time with the BT-1000 Expansion Interface Unit. 

• The BT-1000 is limitless combinations. Plug in your disk 
controller, memory boards, Real Time Clock/Calendar, 
printer interface, experimental boards— all at one time. 

• The BT-1000 is adaptable. Up to five functional peripheral 
cartridges, in your choice of combinations, will run with 
any configuration, any size memory of the Color Computer. 

• The BT-1000 is flexible. Four 24-pin sockets hold up to 
8K static RAM or EPROM (can be supplied with an 
extra 8K RAM). 

• The BT-1000 is safe. It will not overload, overheat or 
damage your Color Computer in any way. 

1. Has own built-in power supply. 

2. Effectively isolated by a buffered cable. 

That's not all Basic Technology has to offer. . . 

Record date and time on all programs, files, letters, with the 
accurate, programmable BT-1020 Real Time Clock/Calendar. 

• Plugs into your BT-1000 or directly into the Color 
Computer expansion slot. 

• Adds day, date, month, year, hours, minutes, seconds 
(12/24 hr.) 

• Includes internal NiCad battery, crystal controlled to 
0.001 % accuracy (charges when your computer is on) 

• Has 50 bytes of battery backed general purpose memory 



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• gold board-edge connectors 

• glass epoxy PC boards 



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BT-1020 Clock/Calendar $109 



BT-1000 incl. cable $270 
BT-1000 w/8K RAM $300 

Add $5.00 shipping & handling for BT-1000, $2.50 for BT-1020. 
Michigan residents add 4% sales tax. Shipping & handling for 
residents of Canada, Hawaii, Alaska is $10.00. Overseas 
orders add 15%. Check, money order, VISA, MC (give account 
no., expiration date, phone no.). Personal checks allow 2-3 
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money order). 

"Watch for more peripherals from Basic Technology." 

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(313) 627-6146 



TECHNOLOGY 



^^ 



keep your dates' phone numbers in order, you could put 
them under the person's name. Later, if you wanted to add 
some other information about your date (I won't say what, 
I'm not nosey), type the note and use the person's name as a 
descriptor again. The phone number and the other 
information will file together under the person's name. 

But retyping a long list gets wearysome, so the program 
lets you print out your file in alphabetical order, or record it 
on tape. Typig an up-arrow at the issue-page prompt gets 
you to the Print, Record, and Load from tape mode. 

In this mode, you will be asked what you want to do. If 
you want to Print, then theprogramoutputsan alphabetical 
list to the printer and returns you to the input mode without 
clearing the memory. To clear the memory, re-RUN the 
program. 

The Tape and Load function permit you to store your file 
in alphabetical order on tape, and to load it back in again. 
You are prompted in both cases to name the file. This 
feature permits you to use RAINDEX for many different 
types of files. 

That about does it for RAINDEX. I have asked the 
editors of the Rainbow if they would like a more complete 
index to the magazine than the one listed below. I might also 
consider, if there were enough, compiling a "Whole Color 
Computer Bibliography" listing articles about our favorite 
micro from many different magazines. If you would like to 
see it done, drop me a postcard (Box 794, Potsdam, NY 
13676) and I will try to get one together. 

The listing: 

10 REM RAINDEX=PEEK (RAINBOW) 
(C) 1982 BY M.P.WILSON 
BOX 794, POTSDAM, N.Y. 
13676 VER 1.4 

20 CLEAR 1 5000 : D I MA* ( 25 , 1 00 ) : FORX 

=0TO25: A* (X, 0) ='"^^» : NEXT: T$= 

: PRINT: PRINT 

30 D*="": PRINT" ISSUE. PAGE ";:LIN 

E INPUTZ*: IFMID$(Z$, 1, 1>="^"THEN 

330 

40 PR I NT "ANY TAG?" 

50 J2*=INKEY$: IFJ2$=""THEN50 

60 J2=ASC ( J2*> : IFJ2>13THENJ2*="< 

" + J2*+ " > " ELSE J 2$= " " 

70 PRINTJ2* 

80 PRINT"DESCRIPTOR":LINE INPUT 

Z2* 

90 T2=0:D*=Z2*+" : "+Z*+J2*:A3=AS 

C(D*):D=A3-65: IFD<0THEN T2=1ELSE 

IFD>25 THEN T2=l 

100 IFT2>0THENPRINT M BAD INPUT, T 

RY AGAIN" :GOTO30 

110 FORX=0TO100: IFA*<D, X)='"^^"T 

HEN E=l ELSE A=INSTR <D*, T*> : A2=I 

NSTR<A*<D,X> ,T*>:C2*=LEFT*<D*,A> 

:C*=LEFT*<A$<D,X> ,A2) : IFC*<C2*TH 

EN NEXT ELSE IFC$=C2* THEN E=2 E 

LSE IFC*>C2$THEN E=3 

120 Q=X:K3=Q 

130 CLS:PRINT"^-STRT DN^-END — R 

TN ?-CNC /-DES *-DEL" : IFK3<0THEN 

K3=0ELSEK3=K3 

140 ifk3>0Thenprintd; " , " ; K3-1 ; " 

"A*(D,K3-1> ELSE PRINT M start of 



file" 

150 IFK3<10THENK4=8ELSEK4=9 

160 C4$=C*: IFC4$=C2$ THEN170ELSE 

PRINTSTRING*<K4, " " ) ; D*: GOTO180 

170 1 FC4*= " " THENPR I NTSTR I NG* ( K4 , 

" " ) ; DSELSEPR I NTSTR I NG$ ( K4 , " * " ) 5 

D* 

180 IFK3<100THEND2*=A*<D,K3)ELSE 

D2*="end of file" 
190 IFD2$= ,, "THEND2*="past '""^ ma 
rker" 
200 printd; ■', M ;K3; " ";D2$ 

210 J*=INKEY*: IFJ$=""THEN210 

220 IFJ*="^"THENK3=K3-1 : GOTO130 

230 IFJ*=CHR*<10)THENK3=K3+1: IFK 

3>99THENK3=99ELSEK3=K3:GOTO130 

240 IFJ$="-"THENK3=Q:GOTO130 

250 IFJ*="?"THEN30 

260 IFJ*="/"THEN PR I NT "CORRECT D 

ESCRIPTOR": INPUTZ2*:GOTO90 

270 IFJ$="*"THENPRI NT "DELETE ITE 

M IN FILE. ": INPUT "ENTER D";D:INP 

UT"ENTER Q";Q:FOR Y=Q TO 99:A$<D 

9 Y) =A* <D, Y+l ) : NEXT: GOTO30 

280 IFJ*="@"THEN ON E GOTO 290,3 

00,310 ELSE 210 

290 A* (D, Q+l ) = »^^» : A* (D, Q >=D*: G 

OTO320 

300 C3*=RIGHT*<D*,LEN<D*)-A>:A*< 

D,Q)=A*(D,Q)+" "+C3$:GOTO320 

310 F0RX=99T0Q STEP-1 : A* (D, X+l )= 

a*<d,x> :next:a*<d,q>=d* 

320 PRINT#-2,A*<D,Q):GOTO30 
330 AUDIO ON: INPUT "R-TAPES L-LOA 
DS P-PRINTS ^-CANCL"5R$: IFR$="^" 
THEN30 ELSE IFR$="P"THEN430ELSEI 
NPUT"DATA FILE NAME <LIMIT IS 8 
CHAR > " ; G* : I F LEN ( G* ) >8THEN330ELS 
E I FR*= " L " THEN370ELSE I FR*= " R " THEN 
340ELSE330 
340 OPEN"0",#-l,G* 

350 FORX=0TO25:FORY=0TO100: IFA*< 
X , Y)< "^^"THENPRINT#-1 , A* ( X , Y) : N 
EXTY 

360 PRINT#-1,A*(X,Y) : Y=0:NEXTX:C 
LOSE#-l:GOTO30 
370 OPEN" I ",#-l,G* 
380 K=0:J=-1 
390 IF EOF (-1) THEN420 
400 INPUT#-1,G*:PRINTG*: J=J+1:A* 
(K, J)=G*: IFG*="^^"THEN K=K+1: J= 
-l:GOTO390 
410 GOTO390 
420 CLOSE#-l:GOTO30 
430 FORX=0TO25:FORY=0TO100: IFA*( 
X,YK"^^"THEN PRINT#-2, A*(X,Y) : 
NEXTY 

440 IFA*<X,Y) = "^^"THEN Y=0:NEXT 
X 
450 GOTO30 



128 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 




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Science... 



A Staggering Proposition 
(With Sobering Implications) 



by R. Delbourgo 



RAINBOW 



Picture to yourselves the following scene: a drunkard, 
having drained his last bottle, is standing under a lamppost 
in the middle of a park. He is full of alcohol and must now 
totter home (or to the nearest liquor store to acquire another 
bottle!) As you can imagine, his step is farf rom sure and he 
walks this way and that, quite randomly in fact. Each step 
that he takes moves him sometimes nearer, sometimes 
farther, from his starting-point and one wonders if he will 
ever reach his destination! After 100 steps, say, the effort is 
too much for him and he collapses on the ground in a 
drunken stupor. If, for the sake of argument, each stride of 
his is one foot in length, the question is, 

"How far away is he, on the average, from the lamppost?" 

This intriguing poser is met in many areas of science and 
mathematics, in different and fancier guises. It goes under 
the general heading of Brownian Motion or Stochastic 
Processes. (It was the botanist, Brown, who first observed 
this random motion microscopically by studying the 
behavior of pollen particles suspended in water and noticing 
how they were buffetted about by collisions with water 
molecules, themselves too small to be seen.) There are far- 
reaching scientific implications in the random walk 
problem, but it is not the object of this article to describe any 
of these. Rather, I hope to tempt you into experimenting on 
the problem yourselves to see if you can discover the 
practical answer to this question with the help of your 
friendly 80C. 

There is of course a classical theoretical answer; it is that 
the average distance traveled by the drunkard goes up as the 
square root of the total number of steps. Put more simply, he 
is likely to be only 10 feet from the lamppost after 100 
strides; eight feet after 64 strides, and so on. I will spare you 
the proof of this remarkable prediction ( you can find it in 
textbooks anyway) but you must appreciate that the 
theoretical answer refers to the probable distance covered. 
In any particular walk our sozzled fellow may actually cover 
more ground or less ground than the theoretical prediction. 
Therefore, before you reach any conclusions from your own 
experiments with the 80C, repeat the experiments several 
times to find out the drunkard's mean range. The 80C is a 
marvelous help this way. We will ask it at one and the same 
time to act as the drunkard, to show us where he is, to plot 
out the motion, to assess the results of successive 
experiments and to compare experiment with theory. What 
more can you ask of it? 

For our first experiment let us suppose that our drunkard 
has a sense of direction and that he is sober enough to move 
along an east-west path. Also suppose his stride is two feet 
instead of one foot as above (you will see the reason for this 
presently when we come to variations on the theme). We will 
ask the 80C to take 64 steps, measure out the distance and 
plot the results out nicely for our inspection. The drunkard's 
position can be set out as a PPOINT(X,Y) on the screen with 
X=128 being taken as the location of the lamppost. X 
increases or decreases randomly by two with each stride and, 
to make the location more visible, let us increase Y by three 
for every step. Listing I below shows how to program all of 



0372 
0388 



End 
End 



16K 



1 P0KE359, 13:SCREEN0, l:CLS(RND(9 
>-l> 

2 FORS=0TO3:PRINT@14+I+S*96, "THE 



130 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



NEW for the Color Computer TRS-60 

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" ; : I ■ I +4*RND ( 2 ) -6 : PR I NT646+ I +S*9 
6, "RANDOM"; : I=I+4*RND<2)-6:PRINT 
@78+I+S*96, "WALK"; : I=I+4*RND <2> - 
6INEXTS 

3 PRINTQ426, "r&d. delbourgo" ; :PRI 
NTQ456, "15,willowdene av. "; :PRIN 
T@481, "hobart, tasmania, austral i 
a7005"; 

4 S0UND2 18,1: S0UND227 , 1 : S0UND232 
, 1 : S0UND239, 1 : S0UND232, 1 : S0UND22 
7, 1IS0UND218, 1:FORT=1TO500INEXT 
10 N=64:POKE359,13ISCREEN0, 1ICLS 
(RND(9)-1) :INPUT"ENTER NUMBER OF 

WALKS" ; W: DIMP (256) : P0KE65495, 0: 
P0KE359, 126 

li form=itow:x=0:y=-3:pmode3, i:c 

0L0R5 , RND ( 3 ) + 1 : PCLS : SCREEN 1 , RND ( 
2) -l: LINE (128,0) -(128, 191) , PSET 

12 F0RS=1T0N 

13 X=X+4*RND(2)-6 

14 Y=Y+3:PSET(128+X,Y,5) INEXTS 

15 SOUND150,5IX=X+128:P(X)=P(X)+ 
1INEXTM 

16 PM0DE3, l: PCLS: SCREEN 1, RND (2) - 
1IC0L0R3, 5: LINE (128,0) -(128, 191) 
,PSET:LINE(0, 191)-(255, 191) , PSET 

17 F0RX=68T0188STEP4:C=X/4-2*INT 
(X/8) : FORI=0TO7: C0L0R2*C, 5 : LINE ( 

2*X-132+I, 191)-(2*X-132+I, 191-20 

0*P(X)/W) ,pset:nexti,x 

18 FORX=0TO255:L2=(X-128)*(X-128 
)*P<X)+L2:NEXTX 

19 CLS:PRINT"YOU HAVE WALKED A M 
EAN SQUARED DISTANCE"L2/W: PRINT 
PR I NT "(THE THEORETICAL ANSWER 

IS 256) " 

20 POKE65494,0:FORT=1TO5000INEXT 
TIRUN10 

The title Lines 1-4 give a flavor of the goodies to follow. 
Line 10 stipulates that the total number of steps (N) is always 
64 in this particular experiment. It also allows you to choose 
how many walks you want the drunkard to take. Make W 
bigger than five or so if you want meaningful statistics, but 
keep W less than about 50 unless you are not easily bored. 



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Lines 11-15 provide you with a picture of the drunkard's 

position with respect to the lamppost (the central line on the 

screen). Notice the combination 4*RND(2) - 6 in line 13 to 

give you +2 or -2 with equal chance. 

In Line 15 the computer counts how many times the 

drunkard, P(X), reaches the final location (X) where the 

poor man collapses. 

The purpose of Lines 16 and 17 is to graph the number of 

times a certain distance is covered after 64 steps, given your 

chosen number of journeys (W). SHIFT@ if you want to 

view the graph at your leisure and form your deductions 

about the random walk. 

Lines 18 and 19 tell the 80C to work out the average squared 

distance and compare the figure with the theoretical result 

256 (which equals 64 times the square of two). 

Line 20 repeats the whole enterprise; break when you tire of 

it all. 

One thought has probably crossed your minds already. 
What if the drunkard does not take steps of equal length? 
What effect will this have? Easy! Just change a couple of 
lines, or so. For instance suppose that the steps are likely to 
be 0,2,4 feet in length, in either direction. In that case simply 
change Line 13 to 

13 X=X+RND(5)-6 
and substitute 5 1 2 for 256 in the theoretical value in Line 19. 
(Why 512? Because it is 64 times the mean of 4*4, 2*2,0*0, 
2*2, 4*4, the squared distances of his possible strides.) 
Alternatively you might conceivethatthe drunkard can take 
integer steps from to 4, east or west. Use instead 

13 X=X+RND(9)-5 
and, because he now covers integer distances, change Line 
17 to 

17 FORX=66TO190:C=X-2*INT(X/2):FORI=0TO3:- 
COLOR2*C,5: 

ET: 

NEXTI,X 

Also, the theoretical answer in Line 19 is about 427; see if 
you can figure out why. If you want decent statistics here 
make him go 20 walks at least! 

Maybe you are wondering why the total number of steps 
(N) has to be fixed at 64 in line 10. Well, it does not need to 
be. You can make less than 64 to stay on the screen (or else 
you will need to radically alter some other lines in the 
program); and don't forget to change your theoretical value 
in Line 19 proportionately. 

A more interesting variation of the one-dimensional walk 
(yes, that's the jargon phrase for it) is to increase N 
systematically. This is what I have attempted in the next 
Listing (A). Lines I to 4 and Line 20 stay as they are, but the 
remaining lines are changed as follows: 

11 PRINT "THE COMPUTER WILL NOW C 
RRRY OUT FN EXPERIMENT,, IT WILL 
UNDERTRKERRNDOM WRLKS OF 8,16,24 
,64 STEPS FIND IT WILL PRINT 

OUT THE POSITION RS EACH WALK P 
ROCEEDS. THEN IT WILL. PLOT THE D 
ISTRNCE TRAVELLED D RGB INST THE 

TOTAL " ; 

12 PR I NT" NUMBER OF STEPS N. " •> I HP 
LIT "ENTER THE NUMBER OF TIMES YO 
U WANT THE EXPERIMENT TO BE DO 
NE".iE< PRINT"" : DIM PC E, 8 '> 

1 3 F0RM= 1 TOE '• F0RN« 1 TOS : X«0 ; FORS- 
1T08*N 

14 X*X+4#RND<2> 6 



132 



the RAINBOW Janu 



1983 



1 5 PR I N7>! j s NEXTS ; PR I NT M " = PC M , H >* 
flBS< X ) : PR I NT '» THE TOTRL. D I STANCE 
TRAVELLED AFTER " S*N " STEPS WAS 
" RBSC X > = PR I NT M " •• SOUND 1 6*N .. 1 5 : NEX 
TN,M 

1 6 P0KE359 •• 1 26 ; PMODE 1 .. 1 : PCLS : SCR 
EEN 1 , RND< 2 >- 1 : COLORS , 5 ; L I NEC , > 
~< , 1 9 1 ) , PSET = L I NE< , 1 9 1 >-'• 255 , 1 
9 1 ■• .. PSET •• DRRU " BM 1 2 , 1 2 .; C4 .; U8F8U7 " 
* DRAW " BMSI40 , 1 34 ; C4 .; U8R4F2D4G2L4 " 

1 7 FORM* 1 TOE : FORN« 1 T08 = C I RCLEC 6* 
PC M , N ) , 1 92-24*N > , M , 2 ■ NEXTN , M 

1 3 FORX* 1 T095 ■' PSETC X , 1 9 1 -XtX.-'47 , 
5,4>=NEXTX 

In this second set of experiments the computer increases N 
in steps of eight up to 64 and, just for a change, it prints out 
the position as the walk proceeds. In line 12 you have the 
option of choosing the number of times the 80C should 
repeat this sequence. 

Lines 16 and 17 are quite new; they are used to plot the 
distance (D) along X, against the number of strides (N) 
along Y every time the experiment is run. The results feature 
as a cluster of points/ circles. For comparison, the 
theoretical curve is drawn in line 18; all being well, it should 
run through the cluster. Again, you are at liberty to vary the 
strides by changing Line 14 as described before. At the same 
time remember to adjust the theoretical curves in line 18. 
One suggestion: don't repeat the experiment too often 
(make E less than about 1 0) or you will get fed up waiting for 
the results! 

Of course, the experiments so far are quite unreal. Who 
ever heard of a drunkard tottering in one direction! He is, of 
course, just as likely to stagger in other directions than an 
east-west line. This brings us to the two-dimensional 
random walk (apologies for the jargon!). Listing 2, next, will 
literally broaden our horizons. Lines 1 ,3,4,20 are the same as 
in Listing I. The new line 2 gives an inkling of what is to 
come. 

1 P0KE359, 13ISCREEN0, l:CLS(RND(9 
)-l) 

2 PR I NTQ207 , " " ; : FORS= 1 TO 1 : K=2* 
RND(2)-3: I=I+2*K:PRINT@207+I+J, " 

" 5 : PR I NTQ207+ I + J -K , " " ; : SOUND 1 8 
0, 1 : J=J+64*RND (2) -96: PRINT6207 + I 
+J, " "; ISOUND210, l:NEXTS:PRINT@8 
, "THE RANDOM WALK"; 

3 PRINTQ426, VW. delbourgo" ; :PRI 
NTQ456, "15,willowdene av. " ; :PRIN 
TQ481, "hobart , tasmania, austral i 
a7005"; 

4 S0UND218, 1IS0UND227, 1 : S0UND232 
, 1 : S0UND239 , 1 : S0UND232 , 1 : S0UND22 
7, 1 : S0UND218, 1 : FORT=1TO500: NEXT 
10 N=64:P0KE359, 13ISCREEN0, 1ICLS 
(RND(9)-1) : INPUT"ENTER NUMBER OF 

WALKS" ;WIDIMP (656) :POKE65495,0: 
P0KE359, 126 

li form=itow:x=0:y=0:pmodei, i:co 

L0R5, RND (3) +1 : PCLS: SCREEN1 , RND (2 
)-l 

12 FORS=lTON 

13 PI=3. 1415926: D=8: A=PI*RND <2*D 
)/D:L=5 



14 x=x+l*cos<a>:y=y+l*sin<a> :pse 
t(x+128,y+95,5) :nexts 

15 sound150,5:r=int<sqr<x*x+y*y> 
) : r=r+1 : p (r) =p (r) +1 : nextm 

16 PM0DE3, 1 : PCLS: SCREEN1, RND <2> - 
l:COLOR3,5:LINE(0, 191)-(255, 191) 
,PSET 

17 F0RK=lT0127:C=K-2*INT(K/2) :FO 
RI=0TO1 : C0L0R2*C, 5: LINE (2*K+I , 19 
1)-(2*K+I, 191-400*P(K)/W) ,PSET:N 
EXTI,K 

18 FORR=0TO255:L2=R*R*P(R+1)+L2: 
NEXTR 

19 CLS:PRINT"YOU HAVE WALKED A M 
EAN SQUARED DISTANCE"L2/W: PRINT 

PRINT" (THE THEORETICAL VALUE 

IS 1600)" 

20 POKE65494,0:FORT=1TO5000:NEXT 

t:runi0 

A few explanations: In line 13, D represents the number of 
directions which the drunkard can take; in principle these 
could be infinitely many. You may feel that I was silly to 
choose D=8. If so, you are welcome to select your own value 
of D (but I think D= 18 should be ample). For the moment, 
run the program as it is. 

Notice that the length L of each stride has been made five, 
rather than two. This is just so that the locations can show 
up more clearly on your screens. 

Line 14 PSETs the location; Line 15 works out the distance 
(R) from the lamppost and counts the number of times the 
distance is reached via P(R). Lines 16 and 17 serve the same 
purpose as in Listing 1 , only this time the origin of the graph 
is at bottom left, not in the middle. Lines 18 and 19 compare 
your results with hypothetical expectations. 



^ 



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Winnipeg, Man. R3T 2X5 CANADA 

*T.M. of Tandy Corp. 



1 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 133 



Feel free to vary your drunkard's stride. For example 
make L=RND(9) in Line 14 (still giving him an average 
stride of five units) and amend your theoretical answer in 
Line 18 to 2027. Or else you could take 

L=RND(5)+RND(5)-1 
which provides a theoretical average of 1856. And so on and 
so forth. Experiment for yourselves — this is the whole point 
of the exercise. 

Last but not least, you might care to find out how the 
average distance depends on the total number of steps taken. 
Change Lines 10-19 in Listing 2 to those of Listing B: 

10 P0KE359, 13 ; SCREENS, 1 : CLS-- RND( 
9 5-1 )= P0KE65495, 

11 PR I NT "THE COMPUTER WILL HOW C 
FIRRY OUT RH EXPERIMENT,, IT WILL 
UNDERTRKERRNDOM WRLKS OF 8,16,24 
,,,,.,64 STEPS RND IT WILL PRINT- 
OUT THE POSITION RS ERCH WALK P 

ROCEEDS. THEN IT WILL PLOT THE D 
I STANCE TRAVELLED D RGRINST THE 
TOTAL " ; 

12 PRINT-'MUMBER OF STEPS N. »' ' IMP 
UT "ENTER THE NUMBER OF TIMES VO 
U WANT THE EXPERIMENT TO BE DO 
ME" .;E = PRINT" " =DIMP(E,3> 

1 3 FORM"- 1 TOE ; FORN- 1 TOS : X«0 ; Y=0 : F 
0RS«1T03*M 

1 4 P I * 3 „ 1 4 J. 5526 = D = 8 ; A ::::: P I * R N D < 2 * D 
>/[;, : l=s5 : X=X+L*C0S«; A ) = V=Y+L*SINC A 
\i 

15 PMNTINTOOj 'PRIHTINTfY),- iPRI 




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QUALITY PROGRAMS FOR YOUR 80C 

%£% PROGRAMS REQUIRE 16K EXTENDED RASIC FOR 
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You are participants in the fastest growing pheno- 
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NT " " .; ■■ WEXTS : P~- 1 NT< SGlFK X*X+Y*Y > 
> : F< M , N j»R = PR I NT " •■ = PR I NT M THE TOT 
RL DISTANCE TRAVELLED, AFTER M 8 
*H " STEPS WAS n R : PR I NT " »' : SOUND 1 6&H 
, 15-NEXTN.M 
1 6 P0KE359 .. 1 26 = PM0DE 1 , 1 •■ PCLS • SCR 

EEN1 , RND( 2 ) 1 : COLORS, 5 = LINE': ■ > 

-< , 1 9 1 > , PSET - L I NEC , 1 9 1 > < 255 , 1 

9 1 ) .. PSET i DRAW " BM 1 2 , 1 2 ; C4 .; U8F8U7 " 
= DRRW u Bri249, 184 ; C4 ; U8R4F2D4G2L 4 M 
:!. ? FORM* 1 TOE ■■ FORM- 1 TOS = C I RCLE-:: 3 * 
P< M , N ) , 1 92-24*N ) , M , 2 : NEXTN , M 
1 8 F0RX-- 1 TO 120 ; PSETC X , 1 9 1 -X*X/ , 75 
.. 5,4) = HEXTX 

and play with variations on these. I do hope that these 
experiments will stimulate you into reading more about the 
subject, and discovering the importance of the random walk 
for the development of scientific theories about the nature of 
heat. In any case, I trust you will have some fun with these 
programs. /^\ 



Hardware Review... 

This Paddle For The 
CoCo Works Just Fine 

So, maybe, I am not as smart as I think (you knew it all the 
time, of course). 

What's the difference between a paddle and a joystick? I 
asked when one of them arrived recently in the mail for 
review. 

Well, a joystick lets you make moves up and down, left 
and right. You can go anywhere. It's essential for the Pac 
Man-like games because you want to move all over the 
screen. 

But the paddle? Well, it lets you go right to left, left to 
right. But no up and down. So, what's the use, really? The 
joystick gives you both of these movements at once. 

"Just try it with Astro Blast'' Bob Rosen, who sells this 
thing, the Spectrum Paddle, asked. You'll see. 

So I did. And I did. 

The response on this thing is excellent. I confess to not 
understanding the electronics of it, but it seems to me that all 
the "extra" that went into worrying about the up and down 
locations now is addressed to the side to side. This gives you 
the ability to make little bitty movements with your 
paddle — so very important when trying to peek out from 
behind a barrier and zap an alien. You can move quickly, 
slowly or just sit there. You do have a better control of the 
right to left movement than with any joystick we have seen 
so far. Bar none. 

The Spectrum Paddle comes in a high-impact plastic case 
and is extremely well put together. It's an attractive light 
brown and, I would say, is better than the "Paddles" I got 
with my Atari game machine several years ago. The fire 
button gives quick response. 

Finally, I did better than usual on Astro Blast. And on 
Space Invaders, too. 

(Spectrum Projects, 93-15 86th Drive, Woodhaven, NY 
11421, $19.95 plus$2s/h) 

— Lonnie Falk 



134 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 




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Editor / Assembler CO-RES9 System Monitor trsmon 



CO-RES9 is a Co-resident Editor/Assembler that 
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CO-RES9 editor/ assembler tape 0N*J 

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64K Version Now Available— FLEX Not Required 



TRSMON is a 2K machine language monitor pro- 
gram for use in any color computer system. A 
Monitor is a program which allows the user to 
directly manipulate the computer. Small pro- 
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ram and executed. Program execution can be 
stopped at any point by'using breakpoints to see 
if it is functioning properly or check its status. 
TRSMON provides all of the standard functions 
found in most system monitor programs as well 
as a printer/terminal driver package. Printer and 
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TRSMON on tape w/manual $19.95 



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Automatic word wrap Eliminates Split words 

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Education... 



Lecture Graphics: 
Chemical Bonding Simulation 



By Lane P. Lester 




While of professional use to few of our readers, the 
following article and listing is both an interesting glimpse 
into atomic structures and chemical bonding, and an 
excellent example of the use of computer programming as a 
graphics aid for instructional purposes in general. 

The bold graphics of the Color Computer offer the 
teacher a tool in computer-aided instruction that has not yet 
been fully explored; namely, lecture graphics. While some 
concepts can be best illustrated with the use of the 
chalkboard, overhead transparencies, 35mm slides, or 
16mm film, other concepts can be discussed with enhanced 
clarity by the use of computer graphics synchronized with 
the teacher's oral presentation. A maj or breakthrough in the 
development of lecture graphics occurred with the invention 
of Motion Picture Programming by the late Arnold Pouch. 
This technique has eliminated most of the tedium of 
programming graphic presentations in Basic and is available 
commercially from Superior Graphic Software (reviewed in 
the Rainbow, July, 1982). Arnold also unselfishly made the 
MPP technique available free by publishing it in the March 
and April, 1982, issues of the Rainbow. 

Most courses in general biology include a discussion of 



3§^ 



LE CABINET 
SERIOUS UTILITY 

^ MULTIPURPOSE 

INFORMATION MANAGEMENT 



Maintain any file you create; 

mailing lists, inventory, investments, 

budgets, recipies. 

Alphabetizes 

Sorts Numeric Entries 

Searches for key words or numbers 

Computes totals and averages 

by catagories. 

Saves Records, changes or deletes them 

Output to Screen, Printer or Tape. 

Print all or selected records. 

4~, — ,X,-r- Numeric Entries. 

Owners Manual included with sample files 
16K, 32K, Memory Expandable 
Extended Basic Required. 



Moreton Bay 




Software 



$25.95 postage paid 

CA Residents Add 6% Sales Tax 

MORETON BAY 
SOFTWARE 

A DIVISION OF MORETON BAY IABORATORY 

316 South Castillo Street 

Santa Barbara, CA 93101 

(805)962-3127 



simple concepts in chemistry, since so much of recent 
research has concentrated on the study of life at the chemical 
level. CHEMBOND, the program which follows, was 
developed for use in explaining some basic ideas in atomic 
structure and chemical bonding. In order to pace the 
execution of the program to match my discussion of the 
topic, the joystick and fire button provide a convenient 
remote control. CHEMBOND was developed before the 
invention of MPP and contains the usual multitude of 
screen locations in DA TA statements. The following "table 
of contents" provides both instructions for use and 
comments on the program. 

CHEMBOND Table of Contents 

1. TV Calibration Routine (Lines 50-70) 

This is a frequently-used routine that displays bars of all 

eight colors so that the controls of the television can be 

adjusted for optimum classroom viewing. Line 70 illustrates 

the need to call JO YSTK(O) before one can call JO YSTK( 1 ). 

(Move stick forward to advance) 

2. Biology Title (Lines 80-360) 

In all of my lecture graphics I have begun each presentation 
with some kind of title that includes someattractivegraphics 
to stimulate interest. I start this routine several minutes 
before class is scheduled t start, and the students can see it as 
they come into the room. Several of the magazines which 
support the Color Computer have printed programs that 
produce "pretty pictures" of one kind or another and these 
can be used with or without the addition of graphic 
characters announcing the topic. 

(Move stick forward to advance) 

3. Hydrogen Atom (Lines 370-390) 

(Move stick back and press button to show) 

The hydrogen atom, with its single proton and electron, 

serves to introduce atomic structure. The orbital of the 

electron is randomized to illustrate the electron cloud idea. 

(Move stick forward to advance) 

4. Atomic Shells and Fluorescence (Lines 400-470) 

(Move stick back and press button to show) 

a. Shells — The concentric partial circles illustrate the 
different energy levels that electrons can occupy. 

(Press button) 

b. Inner electrons — This simulates electrons orbiting in 
the next to outermost shell. 

(Press button) 

c. Outer electrons — Af lash of yellow illustrates the input 
of energy required to drive an electron to a higher shell. 

Press button to illustrate fluorescence 

or 

move stick forward and press button to advance 

5. Covalent Bond (Lines 480-540) 

(Move stick back and press button to show) 

The formation of the diatomic hydrogen molecule is used 
to illustrate the concept that sharing electrons allows two 



136 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



FIRST ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL 

That's right people, we have been in business 
for one year. Hence we are having a first 
Anniversary special. Snake Mountain Software is 
pround to announce a new line of products. We 
are going into the cartridge business. Our 
cartridges are very similar to Radio Shack's 
cartridges. Prices good through Jan. Jl , 1983- 

PROGRAMS 
An enhanced version of the Solution on a 
cartridge. $29-95 



HARDWARE 
A cartridge case and PC board with a 
Accepts either a 2716 or 2732. 



socket. 



CUSTOM CARTRIDGES 
You send in a program, we send you back a 
cartridge with a program in it. We can do 
either Basic or ML programs. Prices start at 
$19.95. Send for complete details. 



GRAPH LABEL 

Have you ever wanted to place characters on a graphic 
screen but couldn't find an easy way to do »t Well then 
GRAPH LABEL is for you This program will enable you to 
place characters anywhere on a graphic screen It will place 
any of 96 ASCII characters on the screen or you may create 
your own characters It features a cursor that may be moved 
anywhere around the screen with out rubbing out what it 
goes over Superscripts and subscripts may be used since 
the cursor may be moved vertically and horizontally in steps 
as small as one pixel Lowercase characters have descend- 
ers GRAPH LABEL is written in Basic and is therefore easy 
to modify. It may be used by itself or as a subroutine. 
$8 95 



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• prints characters on any two-color graphic screen 

• graphics and text may be intermixed on the same screen 

• special mode with 4 lines of text at the bottom of the 
screen (just like some other famous color machines) — 
great for working with graphics 

• large character mode for small children or the visually 
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• character set may be reversed 

• written in machine language, program is relocatable 

• fast — prints at over 600 characters per second 

• works with both cassette and disk 

• includes a 20 page manual with demo programs (a lunar 
lander program is included) 

SOLUTION $14.95 



EXTENOER 

Still want more than 42 characters per line from your 
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PILOT is a language which enables people with little 
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An enhanced version of Pilot for use with Extended Basic. 
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execution Comes with as 24 page tutorial manual and demo 
programs Sample program included on tape to get you 
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SCRIPTFIX 

An ML program that enables Color Scripsit to have true upper 
and lower case characters— none of the reversed upper case 
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SCREEN PRINT PACKAGE 

A package of 2 programs for use with the LPVII. LPvMll 
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Both programs work with alt the standard PMODEs The 
programs are written in machine language and rr.ay be 
moved anywhere in memory. The two programs a r e 

1) SCREEN PRINT - will produce a regular size print The 
image may be located anywhere on a page 

2) OOUBLE SIZE SCREEN PRINT — this program will 
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All programs for 16K, 32K Extended Basic machines unless 
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SHIPPING — add $2 00 for orders less than $20 00 Shipping 
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Canadians — please send money orders only 

Phone C.O.D. orders acdepted. 



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All orders shipped within 5 working days 



atoms to achieve a stable number of electrons. 

a. Hydrogen atom with moving electron 

(Press button) 

b. Hydrogen atom with stationary electron 

(Press button) 

c. Two hydrogen atoms with stationary electrons 

(Press button) 

d. Two hydrogen atoms sharing electrons 

Press button to repeat 

or 

move stick forward and press button to advance 

6. Ionic Bond (Lines 550-750) 

(Move stick back and press button to show) 
The formation of sodium chloride serves to demonstrate 
the complete transfer of electrons as a means of achieving a 
stable number. 

a. Sodium and chlorine atoms 

(Press button) 

b. Formation of ionic bond 

Press button to repeat 

or 

move stick forward and press button to advance 

7. Hydrogen Bond (Lines 760-790) 

(Press button to show) 

This simulates the water molecule in which the shared 
electrons spend more time orbiting around the oxygen than 
the hydrogens. This produces the polarity of the molecule 



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SOFTWARE 

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316 South Castillo Street 

Santa Barbara, CA 93101 

(805)962-3127 

Color Computer TRS 80 * Tandy Corp. 



Software 



1390 
0947 



End 
500 



that makes hydrogen bonding possible. I'm not satisfied 
with this one, but I've never gotten around to doing more 
with it. 

(Move stick forward to advance) 

8. Random Circles and Lines (Lines 800-830) 

This is a version of a somewhat classic random graphics 

routine which I consider preferable to a blank screen as an 

end to the presentation. 

The listing: 

10 'CHEMical BONDing 
20 'Lane P. Lester 
30 'Liberty Baptist College 
40 'Lynchburg, VA 24506 
50 'Calibrate 

60 CLS 0: FOR ROW=0 TO 15: FOR C 
OL=0 TO 31: P=143+16*INT (COL/4) : 

POKE 1024+32*ROW+COL,P: NEXT CO 
L,ROW 

70 X=JOYSTK<0> : IF JOYSTK(1)>10 
THEN 70 

80 'Biology Title 
90 CLS 0: PCLEAR 8: PMODE 3,1 
100 J=128+16*<RND<8)-1)+RND<15> : 

FOR 1=1088 TO 1119: POKE I, J: N 
EXT: FOR 1=1471 TO 1440 STEP -1: 

POKE I, J: NEXT: CLR=RND(8)-1 
110 READ I, J: IF IO0 THEN POKE 



1+5*32+1, 


128+16*CLR+J: 


GOTO 110 


120 


DATA 


1056, 14, 


, 1057, 


,12, 1058,12 


130 


DATA 


1059,10, 


,1088, 


11,1089, 3 


140 


DATA 


1090, 3, 


, 1091, 


10, 1120, 10 


150 


DATA 


1123, 10, 


, 1152, 


, 12, 1153, 12 


160 


DATA 


1154, 12, 


, 1155, 


, 8,1061,10 


170 


DATA 


1093, 10, 


1125, 


,10,1157, 8 


180 


DATA 


1063, 14, 


, 1064, 


, 12, 1065, 12 


190 


DATA 


1066, 10, 


, 1095, 


10,1098, 10 


200 


DATA 


1127, 10, 


, 1130, 


, 10,1159, 12 


210 


DATA 


1160, 12, 


. 1161, 


12,1162, 8 


220 


DATA 


1068, 10. 


,1100. 


, 10,1132, 10 


230 


DATA 


1164, 12. 


,1165, 


, 12, 1166, 12 


240 


DATA 


1167, 8. 


,1073. 


, 14, 1074, 12 


250 


DATA 


1075, 12. 


,1076, 


, 10, 1105, 10 


260 


DATA 


1108, 10. 


p 1137. 


, 10, 1140,10 


270 


DATA 


1169, 12. 


,1170, 


, 12, 1171, 12 


280 


DATA 


1172, 8. 


, 1078, 


, 14, 1079,12 


290 


DATA 


1080, 12. 


, 1081. 


, 8,1110,10 


300 


DATA 


1142, 10. 


, 1144. 


, 12, 1145,10 


310 


DATA 


1174, 12. 


, 1175. 


, 12, 1176, 12 


320 


DATA 


1177, 8 


p 1083 


p 10, 1086, 10 


330 


DATA 


1115, 11 


,1116 


p 3,1117, 3 


340 


DATA 


1118, 10 


p 1148. 


p 5,1180, 4 


350 


DATA 


0,0 






360 


X=JOYSTK(0) : 


IF J( 


DYSTK(l) >10 


THEN FOR L=l TO 


1000 


: NEXT: CLS 


0: RESTORE: GOTO 


100 E 


ELSE CLS 0: 


FOR 1=1 


TO 200: 


NEXT 




370 


'Hydrogen Ate 


Dm 




380 


IF PEEK (6528* 


3><>i: 


26 AND PEEK 


(65280)0254 THE! 


M 380 


ELSE PCLS: 


SCREEN 1,0: CIR( 


:le<i: 


28,96) ,6,3: 



138 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 







ASTRO BLAST 

Your routine space patrol in an 
outer galaxy sector becomes a 
life and death struggle with alien 
invasion forces advancing to- 
wards Earth. Wave after wave of 
attack squadrons challenge your 
joystick and fire button skills in 
this super hi-res machine lang- 
uage shoot-em-upgame. One or 
two players. 
Tape version $24.95 



SPACE RACE 

Maneuver your ship around the 
four cornered "race track" in 
space while destroying hordes 
of alien ships. As you fly around 
the"racetrack" bouncing off the 
walls, watch out for mines laid by 
the swarmers. Great color and 
sound and a new approach. 
Tape $21.95 



This starts the first time we have published a top ten for 
the color computer. We have printed a top ten for the 
Model l/IM in 80 Micro for the past year. We have a panel 
of arcade players who send us a list each month of their 
favorite 10 games. These arecompiled and the Computer 
Shack top ten is the result. We are still looking for some 
additional members for our panel. If.you are interested 
please send us a copy of your favorite top ten games. If 
you are a publisher and have a new game send us a few 
copies and we will make sure all members of the panel 
review it. 

Computer Shack has been in the publishing business 
for 2 years publishing software for the TRS-80 Model I 
and III. We are now expanding into the COCO. If you 
would like a major publisher to handle your software 
send us a copy for evaluation. We have full color 
packaging, and established dealer network, foreign 
distributors, and have booths at major computer shows 
throughout the country, etc. We can sell more copies of 
your programs than any other distributor. If you are a 
machine language programmer we have some programs 
that .run on the model I and III that we would like to 
convert to the COCO. If you are interested in this send us 
a sample of your programming along with your name and 
address. 

Our new 32 page catalog (Model I , III and COCO) is hot off 
the press. It contains software, hardware, and misc. If 
you live in the U.S. write nowforyourfree copy. Dueto the 
high cost of mailing, if you live outside the U.S. please 
send $1 .00 for your catalog and we will refund this on 
your first order. 



Note our policy of giving a discount for largerorders. We 
make more money on a big orderand we pass the savings 
along to you. You can save 20% on all your software by 
buying 4 programs. 




SAVE 

10,15,20% 



SPACE TRADER 

Establish vast interstellar shipp 
ing lanes and purchase stock in 
the companies that control 
those trade routes. This is a multi- 
player board game with graph- 
ics. This is a game for the think- 
ers, it takes more than a quick 
hand to win this one. 
Tape • $21.95 

PLANET INVASTION 

A great new Defender action 
game, its success insured by its 
spellbinding graphics and mar- 
velous sound, but most of all by 
its controlability. Using both the 
keyboard and the joystick, you 
manuever your way through this 
revolutionary new game. 
Tape $21.95 

STARFIRE 

As you pilot yourship above the 
peaceful planet, out of nowhere 
comes a vicious alien attack 
wave. If they become to numer- 
ous for you, try a smart bomb. 
Keyboard only 
Tape or disk. ... $21 .95/26.95 




*> I | | | | 

J I I I I I p] 



...„ I I I I I I 
M..1I 111! 

i m m m i 
i 1 1 ii i i 

III 1 HI! 

: 1 1 1 1 

m to 1 1 1 1 1 



1 1 
1 1 
1 1 
1 1 
[ i 
ii 
1 1 




r m 
















•['[•KLi 


JL. 


mm 

■■:.- 














-- 



BUGOUT 



A compact but very powerful 
monitor for the 6809 micro- 
processor. 
Only $19.95 

TELEWRITER - 64 

Best word processor for COCO. 

Tape $49.95 Disk . 



MADNESS AND 
THE MINOTAUR 

A classic adventure game utiliz- 
ing two word commands. 
Price .$19.95 



.$59.95 



COMPUTER SHACK 



1691 Eason • Pontiac, Michigan 48054 
Info: (313) 673-8700 • Orders: CALL TOLL FREE (800) 302-8881 

Master Charge and VISA OK. Please add $300 for shipping in the U.S A - $5.00 for Canada or Mexico - Proper postage outside of U.S. - Canada - Mexico 
Dealers: We are distributors for all items in this ad. Write for our catalog and price list, 



PAINT(128,96) ,3,3 
390 X=RND ( 20 ) +45 : Y=RND ( ) : C I RC 
LE(128,96) ,X,2, 1, Y,Y: CIRCLE (128 

,96) ,x, l, i,y,y: x=joystk<0): if 

JOYSTK(1)>10 THEN 390 ELSE PCLS 
l: FOR 1=1 TO 200: NEXT 
400 'Electron Energy Shells 
410 IF PEEK (65280)0126 AND PEEK 
(65280)0254 THEN 410 ELSE PMODE 
3,5: PCLS 2: PMODE 3,1: COLOR 2 
,3: PCLS: SCREEN 1,0: CIRCLE (0,9 
6), 8, 4, 1, -75, -25: PAINT (2, 96) , 4, 
4 

420 DATA32, -75, .25,64, -75, -25,96 
, -79, -23, 128, -87, - 15, 160, -90, - 11 
, 192, .92, . 10,0,0,0 

430 READ X,Y,Z: IF XO0 THEN CIR 
CLE(0,96) ,X,2, 1,Y,Z: GOTO 430 
440 IF PEEK (65280)0126 AND PEEK 
(65280)0254 THEN 440 ELSE FOR I 
=1 TO 100: NEXT 

450 CIRCLE(0,96) , 160,3, 1, -9, - 11: 
CIRCLE(0,96) , 160,2, 1,-9,-11: IF 
PEEK (65280)0126 AND PEEK (65280 
)<>254 THEN 450 ELSE FOR 1=1 TO 

100: next: pmode 3,5: screen 1,0 
: for 1=1 to 10: next: pmode 3,1 

: SCREEN 1,0 

460 CIRCLE (0, 96) , 192, 3,1,- 92, - 1 : 



COLOR-FORTH 

Including SEMI GRAPH I C-8 EDITOR 
+ UTILITIES 

-Disk and Tape utilities 

-Boot from disk or tape 

-Graphics and Sound commands 

-Printer commands 

-Auto-repeat and Control keys 

-Fast task multiplexing 

-Unique TRACE function in kernal 

-Clean INTERRUPT handling 
in HIGH-LEVEL FORTH 

-CPU CARRY FLAG accessible 

-Game of LIFE demo 

-ULTRA FAST: written in assembler 

-Directions included for 
installing optional ROM in 
disk controller or cartridge 

-Fre* Basic game "RATMAZE" 



FORTH 

Hoyt Stearns Electronics 

4131 E. CANNON DR. PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85028 
602-996-1 71 7 



CIRCLE(0,96) , 192,2, 1, -92, - 1: IF 
PEEK (65280)0126 AND PEEK (65280 
)<>254 THEN 460 ELSE FOR 1=1 TO 

100: next: pmode 3,5: screen 1,0 
:for 1=1 to 10: next: pmode 3,1: 

SCREEN 1,0 
470 X=JOYSTK(0>: IF JOYSTK(1)>10 

THEN 450 ELSE PCLS: FOR 1=1 TO 
200: NEXT 

480 ' Covalent Bonding 
490 IF PEEK (65280)0126 AND PEEK 
(65280)0254 THEN 490 ELSE COLOR 

2,3: PCLS: CIRCLE (128, 96) ,4,4: 
PAINT(128,96),4,4 

500 X=24+RND(10): Y=RND(0): CIRC 
LE(128,96) ,X,2, 1,Y,Y: CIRCLE (128 
,96) ,X,3, 1,Y,Y: IF PEEK(65280)O 
126 AND PEEK (65280)0254 THEN 50 
ELSE FOR 1=1 TO 200: NEXT: CIR 
CLE(128,66) ,2,2 

510 IF PEEK (65280)0126 AND PEEK 
(65280)0254 THEN 510 ELSE PCLS: 

A=100: B=96: C=156: CIRCLE(A,B) 
,4,4: PAINT(A,B),4,4: CIRCLE(C,B 
),4,4: PAINT(C,B) ,4,4: CIRCLE(10 
0,66), 2, 2: CIRCLE (156, 66) ,2,2 
520 IF PEEK (65280)0126 AND PEEK 
(65280)0254 THEN 520 ELSE CIRCL 
E(100,66) ,2,3: CIRCLE (156, 66) ,2, 
3 

530 for 1=1 to rnd(5): x=24+rnd ( 
10): y=rnd(0): circle(a,b) ,x,2, 1 
,y,y: circle(a,b) ,x,3, i,y,y: nex 

T: FOR 1=1 TO RND(5): X=24+RND(1 

0) : y=rnd(0): circle(c,b) ,x,2, 1, 
y,y: circle(c,b) ,x,3, i,y,y: next 
: if peek (65280)0126 and peek (6 

5280)0254 THEN 530 
540 X=JOYSTK(0): IF JOYSTK(1)>10 
THEN 490 ELSE PCLS: FOR 1=1 TO 2 
00: NEXT 

550 'Ionic Bonding 

560 IF PEEK (65280)0126 AND PEEK 
(65280)0254 THEN 560 ELSE DIM E 
(10, 10) ,B(10, 10) ,X(6) ,Y(6) ,Z (6) , 
U(28),V(28): FOR 1=1 TO 6: READ 

X(i),Y(i),Z(i): next: for 1=1 to 
28: read U(i),V(i): next 

570 DATA 32, -75, -25,64, .75, .25 

580 DATA 96, .79, .23,32, -25, -75 

590 DATA 64, .25, .75,96, .23, .79 
600 DATA 0, 60, 0,122, 0, 28 
610 DATA 0,154, 30, 38, 30,145 
620 DATA 47, 54, 47,129, 56, 76 
630 DATA 56,107, 88, 91,246, 60 

640 DATA 246,122,246, 28,246,154 

650 DATA 216, 38,216,145,199, 54 

660 DATA 199,129,190, 76,190,107 

670 DATA 226, 0,226,182,192, 12 

680 DATA 192,170,172, 36,172,146 



140 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



" TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER PRODUCTS " 
" THE 1248-EP EPROM PROGRAMMER " 

The 1248-EP EPROM PROGRAMMER is a full function unit that is 
compatible with virtually all popular 1 K, 2K, 4K & 8K -by-8, 24 pin, 5 
volt EPROMS. Compatible devices are 2508's, 2758 -0/1 's, 
2516's, 2716's, 2532's, 68732-Q/Vs, 68764-5, and 68766's. 
Components 2732, 2732A, 2564, and 2764 are compatible via 
adapters (not supplied]. The programmer is totally menu driven by 
resident position independent firmware in EPROM, which makes it 
suitable for experienced computer operators and novices alike. 

Select the device type to be programmed from the device menu. 
Next, select the function to be performed from the function menu. 
On your command the 1 248-EP will verify EPROM erasure, com- 
pare EPROM contents to specified contents of RAM or ROM, 
program blocks or individual bytes of EPROM memory or copy an 
EPROM's contents to user specified RAM. 

The 1248-EP plugs into the cartridge slot of the Color Computer 
and is invoked by the user with the "EXEC & HC000" BASIC com- 
mand. The 1 248-EP contains its own on-board programming power 
supply, and has a quality "Zero Insertion Force" socket. 

The combination of the TRS-80 Color Computer , an editor/as- 
sembler/monitor such as the Micro Works SOS80C-X--)'- and the 
1248-EP EPROM programmer, makes a high performance, cost 
effective software development station for MC-6800/6809 
microprocessor based systems. Use the system tostoreyourown 
games or utility programs in EPROM's forexecutionfrom the cart- 
ridge slot using the CK4 PROM/RAM card described below. 

The cost of the 1248-EP EPROM PROGRAMMER, instructions 
and adapter diagrams is just $99.95. 

" THE CK4 PROM/ROM CARD " 

The CK4 works with 2K.4K or 8K-by-8 ROM's or EPROM'sof the 5 
volt only variety in 24 pin packages. In addition, the CK4 may be used 
with 4 static RAM's such as 61 16'st o expand the computers 
memory work space by 8192 bytes. Each of the four on-board soc- 
kets can be decoded to any 2K block of the memory map from 
$C000 through $F800 of the Color Computer. In addition, each 
socket can be configured to respond to address blocks from 2K to 
8K bytes in length, thus accommodating 2K.4K or8K-by-8 ROM's, 
EPROM's or RAM's. ROM and RAM can be mixed on the card as 
well. RAM, on the card, can be written toandthen'write protected" 
via dip switches on the CK4 to emulate ROM. 

The instructions include information on how to set up the socket 
decoding circuitry and how to provide battery backup for programs 
stored in CMOS static RAM on the CK4 with the computer off or 
the cartridge removed. 

The popular CK4 PROM/RAM card is now available in three 
versions. 

1 ] The full featured CK4 remains the standard of cartridge board 
flexibility with the added capability of providing battery backup for 
CMOS static RAM's such as 61 16's. Cost of the CK4 is still just 
$29.95. 

2) The CK4-1 is a ROM only version of the CK4 card for use with 
CoCo's with later than "E series" circuit boards. These later ver- 
sions of CoCo are not able to write to cartridge based RAM without 
modification. Cost is $27.95 for the CK4-1. 

3] The CK4-2 is the unpopulated CK4 series circuit board only. Buy 
this version of the CK4 and configure them to meet your specific 
requirements at a price designed to stretch your dollars value. Cost 
is $15.95 each. 

" MORSE ENCODER/DECODER KIT " 

The MEDK80 Morse En/Decoder Kit consists of a machine code 
software driver on tape, a schematic diagram of the interface cir- 
cuitry, component parts, a printed circuit board (PCBJ, packaging 
suggestions and complete instructions for building a Morse code 
transmission and reception system that is compatible with 4K 
RAM and up models of the TRS-BQ. Color Computer , 



The transmitter/receiver interface circuitry is totally optically 
isolated and is, therefore, compatible with all receivers and trans- 
mitters. Transmitter and receiver both connect to the interface 
unit and to the Color Computer via the RS-232 port. 

The MEDK80 Morse En/Decoder kit operates at speeds up to 70 
words per minute and automatically adapts to speed variations of 
the sender. When transmitting, words are transmitted only when 
fully formed, i.e., followed by a space, and the transmit text buffer 
gives visual notification to the operator of what word/ character is 
currently being sent. In addition, the text buffer is 51 2 characters 
deep, which is sufficiently large to keep up with the best of "rag- 
chewers". 

Potential purchasers of this product should have previous kit 
building experience. However, this is not a kit of great complexity, 
and is well within the abilities of those actively involved in amateur 
radio or electronic hobbies to construct. To reduce the chance of 
wiring errors, component placement is indicated on the PCB and 
detailed assembly instructions are included. 

The cost of the MEDK80 software, parts, and instructions is 
$39.95. 

" COCO" GETS A BREADBOARD 

The COCO BREADBOARD is a circuit board that plugs directly into 
the cartridge slot of the Color Computer and provides the user with 
16 square inches of prednlled breadboarding area for circuit de- 
velopment, interfacing experiments, motherboard implementation, 
or whatever your imagination conjures up. The plated thru holes in 
the breadboard are wirewrap pin compatible and on 0.10 inch 
centers. 

The COCO BREAD BOARD brings all of the data, address, and con- 
trol signals available at the cartridge slot outside of the body of the 
computer and the signal lines are appropriately labeled to facilitate 
error free wiring of breadboards. A ground plane is provided on the 
top side of the board and solder pads are provided on the bottom of 
the board, thus facilitating circuit grounding and point-to-point 
wiring. In short, the COCO BREADBOARD was designed with the 
experimenter in mind. 

The COCO BREADBOARD ts attractively priced to justify its use 
for even the lowest budget projects. It is an ideal vehicle for learning 
interfacing techniques. Buy extras to have on hand for those rainy 
weekends. 

The COCO BREADBOARD costs just $19.95. Price for two (2) or 
more is $16.95 each. 

FACTORY FRESH COMPONENTS : 

ITEM DESCRIPTION PRICE 

2716 EPROM 2K by 8 Bit, 350 ns $4.50 ea. 

2532 EPROM 4K by 8 bit, 350 ns $6.50 ea. 

682 1P Pl.A. $3.50 ea. 

74LS156 Open collector decoder $1.70 ea. 

Socket ZIF, 24 pin, Aries $7.95 ea. 

Minimum component order: $25.00 

ORDERING INFORMATION: 

Add $3.00 to all orders to cover shipping and handling. Allow two 
weeks for personal checks. Canadian residents add 5°/o to cover 
special handling. Arizona residents add 4°/o sales tax. Sorry! No 
charges accepted. All items shipped UPS. 



Make checks payable to: 



5801 E. VOLTAIRE DRIVE 

SCOTTSOALE, ARIZONA 85254 

C602) 886-7568 



-;;- TRS-80 is a trademark of TANDY CORP. 
- SOS80C is a trademark of the MICRO WORKS. 
Prices subject to change without notice. 



690 DATA 159, 63 

700 PMODE 3,5: PCLS 3: CIRCLE (12 
8, 96), 5, 2: PAINT(128,96) ,2,2: GE 
T(123,91)-(133, 101), E: GET(100,0 
)-(110, 10) ,b: PMODE 3,1: PCLS 3: 

SCREEN 1,0: CIRCLE (0,96) ,8,4, 1, 
.75,. 25: PAINT(2,96) ,4,4: CIRCLE 
(256, 96), 8, 4, 1, -25,-75: PAINT(25 
4,96) ,4,4 

710 FOR 1=1 TO 3: CIRCLE(0,96),X 
(I) ,2, 1,Y(I) ,Z(I): NEXT: FOR 1=4 

TO 6: CIRCLE (256, 96), X( I) ,2, 1,Y 
(I),Z(I): NEXT: FOR 1=1 TO 28: P 
UT(U(I) ,V(I) >-(U(I)+10,V(I)+10) , 

e: next 

720 IF PEEK (65280)0126 AND PEEK 
(65280)0254 THEN 720 ELSE PLAY" 
V10L4O4 ,, :PUT(88,91)-(98, 101) ,B: 
PUT (98, 98) -(108, 108) ,E: CIRCLE (0 
,96) ,96,3, 1, -79, -23: PLAY M C M : PU 
T (98, 98) -(108, 108) ,B: PUT (108, 10 
4)-(118, 114) ,E: PLAY ,, V12D m 
730 PUT(108, 104)-(118, 114) ,B: PU 
T (118, 109) -(128, 119) ,E: PLAY"V14 
E": PUTU18, 109>-<128, 119) ,B: PU 
T(128, 113)-(138, 123) ,E: PLAY M V16 
F": PUT(128,113)-(138, 123) ,B: PU 
T(138, 116)-(148, 126) ,E: PLAY M V16 
G" 

740 PUT(138, 116)-(148,126) ,B: PU 
T(148, 118) -(158, 128) ,E: PLAY"V18 
A": PUT(148, 118)-(158, 128) ,B: PU 
T(158, 118)-(168, 128) ,E: DRAW M C2S 
1 0BM42 , 26R 1 0BU5BL5D 1 0U5BR35R 10": 



PLAY " L404 V30BO5L32CP6L8CP32L 1 C " 

750 IF PEEK (65280)0126 AND PEEK 

(65280)0254 THEN 750 ELSE X=JOY 

STK(0): IF JOYSTK(1)>10 THEN 700 

ELSE PCLS: FOR 1=1 TO 200: NEXT 
760 'Hydrogen Bonding 
770 IF PEEK (65280)0126 AND PEEK 
(65280)0254 THEN 770 ELSE PCLS 
3: X=47: A=128: B=96: CIRCLE (A, B 
),8,4: PAINT(A,B),4,4: CIRCLE(A- 
X,B-X) ,4,4: PAINT (A-X,B-X) ,4,4: 
CIRCLE (A+X,B-X) ,4,4: PAINT(A+X,B 
-X),4,4 
780 FOR 1=1 TO RND(3): C=RND(0): 

Z=JOYSTK(0): IF JOYSTK(1)<10 TH 
EN 810 ELSE CIRCLE(A,B) ,50,2, 1,C 
,C: CIRCLE(A,B) ,50,3, 1,C,C: NEXT 
: CIRCLE(A-X,B-X) ,20,2, 1,C,C: CI 
RCLE(A-X,B-X) ,20,3, 1,C,C 
790 FOR 1=1 TO RND(3): C=RND(0): 

CIRCLE (A, B) ,50,2, 1,C,C: CIRCLE ( 
A,B),50,3, 1,C,C: NEXT: CIRCLE(A+ 
X,B-X) ,20,2,1,C,C: CIRCLE(A+X,B- 
X) ,20,3,1,C,C: GOTO 780 
800 'Random Graphics 
810 SCREEN1,RND(2)-1 
820 F=RND(4): B=RND(8): IF B=F O 
R B-4=F THEN 820 

830 COLOR F,B: PCLS B: FOR L=0 T 
3: LINE-(RND(255),RND(191) ) , PS 
ET: CIRCLE (RND (255) ,RND(191) ) ,RN 
D(100): NEXT: FOR P=0 TO 6: PAIN 
T (RND (255) , RND (191) ),RND(4) ,F: N 

ext p: for t=0 to 800: next t: x 

=JOYSTK(0): GOTO 810 /0% 



_ll -r— 


L-^— wmnmmm Post Office Box 


1 5235 ! 


Plantation* Florida ! 


All Color Software 33318 




IMtouj ! from ACS - 




<5 ± ve sjcaLJir* CoCo an 


RAINBOW 


On/Off li-saM* f^cai- *S ., OG> ! ! 


Will NOT Void Warranty! 


Now for only $5 you can have an on/off light for your CoCo, 


without 


voiding your warranty!! If you own a Joystick, can drill ONE ho 


le, and 


make TWO connections, then you are ready for this simple Do-I t-Yourself Kit!! 


This simple kit comes with the parts to modify 2 Joysticks, 


and clearly 


written instructions on the procedure, which takes only 10 minut 


es on the 


average. 




Notes This modification Does NOT impede Joystick performance. This kit 


works with any Joystick, and is equally easy to install in each. 




ORDER MOW ! ! NO Extra Shipping 


Charges ! ! 


Florida residents add 57. sales tax. NotesCustom Joysticks still available. 



142 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



Hardware... 

The Hex Pad 
Connection 

By Theodore P. Hasenstaub 

Looking for a quick way to enter Hex code into your 
CoCo's memory? For a modest investment of 
approximately $30 and an evening's worth of time, you will 
be able to do just that. By using this Hex Pad with any 
Monitor program, or a Basic program that allows you to 
POKE Hex code to memory, you will be able to enter all 
Hex codes appearing with machine language programs. 

The CoCo's main keyboard consists only of a matrix of 
switches, which are divided into a series of rows and 
columns. All the inputs and outputs to and from the 
keyboard are controlled by the PIA chip (MC6821). By 
scanning these columns, the PIA can instantly detect and 
decode any inputs from the keyboard. Since the keyboard is 
attached to the main PC board by means of a 16-pin 
connector, and the PIA is the only IC controlling it, it is a 
very simple procedure to attach the necessary connections 
for a Hex Pad. These connections are made at this 16-pin 
connector. 

I have divided the construction into four parts; Computer 
Wiring, Cabinet Construction, Keyboard Wiring and Final 
Assembly. Keep in mind, however, that building this project 
requires wiring inside of the computer, thus voiding any 
Radio Shack warranty that may be in effect. 

COMPUTER WIRING 

Begin by removing the screws holding down the top of the 
computer. Carefully disconnect the keyboard from the 
printed board at the keyboard connector. Now remove the 
keyboard and set it in a safe place. You now haveaccess to 
the 16-pin connector, to which we will make the necessary 
connections that are needed. 

All the pins are used except for pins 2, 3 and 4. Cut 13 
pieces of 30-gauge wire into 15"-long sections. Strip off 
about 3/16" on one end, and about 1/16" on the other. 
Number each wire from I through 1 6 (don't use #'s 2, 3 and 
4). Using the 3/ 16" end, begin wire wrapping from the left- 
most pin on the connector with the wire that you labeled #1 . 
Skip pins, 2, 3 and 4, and continue on with pin 5 through 16. 
You only have to wrap about 1/8" onto the connector, any 
more and you will have trouble when you to to re-install the 
keyboard. Now, connect these wires to the corresponding 
pins on the female DB 25 connector (see Figure 1). 




Key Board Connector 




Figure 1 



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January, 1983 the RAINBOW 



143 



Next, you must mount this DB 25 connector into the side 
of the computer case. The connector should be mounted 
about V2" to the left of where the main PC board comes in 
contact with the right side of the computer case. After 
locating this point, place a mark there. Set the DB 25 
connector at this point and make a mark at the other end. 
Cut out the plastic between these two marks, down to the 
plastic ledge on the case. Use a small file to adjust the hole in 
order to fit the DB 25 into place. Make sure that the 
mounting holes on the DB 25 are set below the top edge of 
the case, so you will be able to drill holes to hold the 
connector to the case (see Figure 2). 

Mark and drill the holes, then mount the connector. Set 
the top of the case back on. You will now have to file a little 
bit of the top half in order for the case to fit properly back 
together over the DB 25 connector. Clean out any plastic 
that has accumulated inside the computer case, then re- 
install the keyboard. Reattach the top half of the case. The 
computer wiring is now complete. 

CABINET CONSTRUCTION 

The cabinet I used was the Radio Shack Slope Front 
Cabinet #270-246. Its color matches the C0C0 pretty 
closely, and the size fits the Hex Pad perfectly. The 
dimensions for the cut-out, mounting holes and brackets are 
shown in Figure 3. 

After you have prepared the cabinet, you can now wire the 
male DB 25 connector. The cable that I used was a one-foot 
piece of telephone cable that had about 20, or so, 
conductors. I removed all but 13 of them in orderto give the 
cable a little flexibility. You should label the wires the way 
you did for the computer. Now, connect these wires to the 
DB 25 connector as you did for the other one. When you are 
finished with this, install the hood on the connector and 
insert the other end through the grommet in the base of the 
cabinet (the length of the cable is up to you). 



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5/32" hole 




Figure 2 




^- Holes below top of case 
DB 25 Connector 

Figure 3 



KEYBOARD WIRING 

Arrange the key caps as shown in Figure 4. The only key 
you will have to modify is the "H" key. I just painted it dark 
grey, cut out a left arrow, and glued it on to the key. 

The way that the key pad is wired allows you to enter any 
Hex number, back up a space by using the arrow key, erase 
the whole line by using the arrow key and shift key together, 



144 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



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A real-time sound "imager" written in Machine Language. 
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and enter a Hex number to memory by using the "L" (load) 
key. 

Place the key in front of you so that the "A" key is located 
in the top right-hand corner. Key pad pin designations and 
wiring are shown in Figure 5 . 

FINAL ASSEMBLY 

Mount the key pad into the cabinet top, and secure it 
using the mounting brackets. I used one-inch long round 
head 6-32 bolts and three 10-24 nuts as spacers (see Figure 
6). All that remains to be done is to wire the 13 conductor 
cables to the key pad as follows: 

DB 25 PIN KEY PAD PIN 

1 ...o - 8 

5 - - 25 

6 ™ 1 6 

7 1 4 

8 - 33 

9 - 34 

10 7 

1 1 5 

12 - 3 

13 - 1 

1 4 - 9 

1 5 « 1 7 

1 6 „ - 1 5 

Check all wire connections and assemble the cabinet. You 
now have your own Hex Pad Encoder. Your CoCo will be 
happy. 



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1— HEX KEYPAD #K-19 $14.95 

Jameco Electronics 

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Belmont, CA 94002 
1 — SLOPE FRONT CABINET #270-246 $4.95 

Radio Shack 
1— MALE DB 25 CONNECTOR WITH HOOD 
1— FEMALE DB 25 CONNECTOR 
1 — 13 CONDUCTOR CABLE 
30 GUAGE WIRE 
MISC. NUTS & BOLTS 



1 

A 


B 


C 


D 


7 


8 


9 


E 


3 


4 


5 


F 


1 


2 


3 


^- 





SHIFT 


L 



Figure 4 



















1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


32 


33 


34 


15 


36 




37 


38 





Figure 5 

Wire the key board as follows: 
Wire PIN #8 to 6 to 4 to 2 to 10 to 18 
PIN #7 to 31 to 11 
PIN #5 to 29 
PIN #3 to 27 
PIN #1 to 23 
PIN #9 to 26 to 21 

PIN #28 to 30 to 32 to 24 to 16 to 38 to 22 to 20 
PIN #17 to 19 
PIN #12 to 14 
PIN #13 to 34 to 37 
PIN #15 to 36 
PIN #33 to 35 



146 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 




Figure 6 



Hardware Review... 



Stand, Tape Holder 
Good Post-Holiday Buys 

So, you got a whole bunch of CoCo software for 
Christmas and now the question comes as to where in the 



world are you going to keep all of this stuff. 

One answer can certainly be a 96-cassette holder that lets 
you keep eveything together and protects it from dust as 
well. 

This cassette holder features six drawers and a case in 
wood-grain plastic that will take even some of the more 
dedicated CoCo-ists among us some time to fill up. The 
drawers are on slides which move easily through grooves 
and have space to accomodate tapes in their cases. This is an 
added bit of insurance against dust. The unit is sturdy and 
has a flat top, another surface that can be used to store 
materials. 

If you have a new printer, you might wish to consider a 
printer stand. The stand comes with and without a shelf and 
is in attractive but sturdy clear plastic. 

We like printer stands. The main reason is that they let 
you place paper beneath the printer — eliminating the 
possibility of jams from between the paper which is feeding 
in and the paper which is feeding out. They also save space, 
since the paper supply can remain underneath the printer, 
rather than in back of it or on the floor. 

The addition of a shelf means you could store two kinds of 
paper beneath the stand — and just thread the type you want 
to use through it as necessary. 

This is a good product and is built to be used with most of 
the popular 80-column printers. 

(Spectrum Projects, 93-15 86th Drive, Woodhaven, NY 
11421, Cassette Case $39.95 96 tapes ($22.95 for 48 tape 
version); stand with shelf $49.95 plus $2 s/h) 



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J 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 147 



Software Review... 

MOPTOWN: Logical Structures 
From Abstract Ideas 

By Don Inman 
Rainbow Contributing Editor 

Very seldom do I find "educational" computer software 
worth writing about. The educational value of most 
programs that claim that distinction is questionable. I 
recently had an opportunity to play-test a series of programs 
called Moptown developed by the Learning Company of 
Alpine, California, and marketed by the Follett Library 
Book Company. These programs definitely contain 
educational qualities. Because the programs provide a wide 
range of ability levels, I recommend them for children of all 
ages. 

Although primarily designed for children's use, adults will 
find the higher level games quite challenging. I highly agree 
with this quote from the manual that accompanies 
Moptown. "Moptown games provide a friendly 
environment where children, using moppets as concrete 
examples, learn to build logical structures using abstract 
ideas." 

The Moptown programs are a series of learning games 
based on the participant's ability to recognize sameness and 
difference, concepts that are basic to logical thinking. From 
early childhood, we are constantly confronted with 
experiences involving the comparison of objects. We attach 
descriptive words such as big or little, fat or thin, rough or 
smooth to differentiate between objects that we encounter. 
The Moppets who reside in Moptown (the fantasy locale of 



Figure 1 



the games) are abstract, but simple, creatures that can be 
completely described by four traits. The contrasting pairs of 
traits are: 

1) tall or short 

2) fat or thin 

3) red or blue 

4) Bibbit or Gribbit 

These four traits give rise to sixteen distinct Moptown 
creatures as shown in the Moptown Family Tree in Figure I . 

The program in the series are arranged in a rough order of 
difficulty. They begin with simple comparisons where 
players are asked to list the characteristics they see or 
recognize a common similarity or difference in a group of 
moppets. Other games aid in learning to recognize patterns, 
or to create strings of differences, either open-ended or with 
some constraints. The last games require higher level 
problem-solving skills. 

Moptown games run on a 16K TRS-80 Color Computer 
with Extended Color Basic. Moptown consists of eleven 
games which are available on cassettes or diskettes. They are 
organized in two packages which may be purchased 
separately. 



PACKAGE 1 

1) Make My Twin 

2) Who's Different 

3) What's the Same 

4) Who Comes Next 

5) Moptown Parade 

6) Who's Next Door 

7) Change Me 

8) Clubhouse 



PACKAGE 2 

1) Secret Pal 

2) Moptown Map 

3) Moptown Hotel 




Tall 

Fat 

Red 

Bibbit 



Tall 

Fat 

Red 

Gribbit 




Tall 

Fat 
Blue 
Bibbit 



Tall 

Fat 

3lue 

Gribbit 




Tall 

Thin 
Red 
Bibbit 



Tall 

Thin 

Red 

Gribbit 




Tall 
Thin 
Blue 

Bibbit 



Tall 




Short 


Thin 




Fat 


Blue 




Red 


Gribbit 




Bibbit 



Short 

Fat 

Red 

Gribbit 




Short 
Fat 
Blue 

Bibbit 



Short 
Fat 
Blue 

Gribbit 




Short 

Thin 
Red 
Bibbit 



Short 
Thin 
Red 

Gribbit 



Short 
Thin 
Blue 
Bibbit 



Short 
Thin 

Blue 
Gribbit 



148 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 




ExIBMer (NOW RETIRED) 

For the FIRST TIME - Makes available to the PUBLIC 

His personal collection of superior programs for the 

TRS-80 COLOR 

SEE HOW THE PROFESSIONALS DO IT!! 
ALL PROGRAMS ARE OVER 14K LONG!! 



TALKING GRAPHIC DEMONSTRATION 

Like no other Computer Program that ever existed! Your CoCo will talk to you with a beautiful musical 
background and tell all about himself while displaying dozens of action packed hi-resolution graphic demon- 
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"This demonstration is MANDITORY. You and your CoCo deserve this program." 
Quote The Rainbow. S24.95T* ^ 

THE DISK DOCTOR — Cure that sick feeling and utter frustration caused by CRASHED I/O 
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Automatic SALVAGE to NEW disk. All in OPEN BASIC! 549.95D * S 

Mr r "TUTORIAL — Programming tool of the professionals — "lets you EASILY create superior 
graphics without using the tedious DRAW, PAINT, LfNE, PSET, CIRCLE, etc. commands. I have seen the results, 
and they are INCREDIBLE — If you want to see and use the full graphic *^j act r\ /~\ 

potential of your CoCo, this program is- REQUIRED!" Quote Chromasette. 534.95T OtUit %*& 

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Although the games are related, each one stands alone. 
Complete instructions are included in each program. You 
may look at the instructions at the beginning of each game, 
or you may go back to the instructions by pressing the 
question mark (?) key after the game has started. 

Although it's impossible to provide complete descriptions 
of all eleven games, I'll give you a quick peek at what to 
expect from a few of the programs. 

Make My Twin 

This is one of the easiest. The computer draws a moppet 
inside a rectangular block. 





You are then requested to make its twin in the empty box. 
You do this by selecting one trait at a time from the 
following menu of traits. 

1) TALL or SHORT (T or S)? 

2) FAT or THIN (F or T)? 

3) RED or BLUE (R or B)? 

4) BIBBIT or GRIBBIT (B or G)? 

As the selections are made, the computer draws your 
moppet in the empty box. After all four traits have been 
described, the creation of your moppet is complete and the 
computer gives a message of: YOU WIN — if correct; or 
THAT'S NOT MY TWIN. PRESS ENTER AND TRY 
AGAIN — if incorrect. After the correct answer has been 



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Biology 

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given, you have a choice of playingagain with a new moppet 
or ending the game. 

This program can be played by the very young. All it 
requires is recognizing the correct traits and making single 
key responses to the computer's questions. 

Who's Different 

Four moppets are drawn in a row on the screen. You may 
choose to have this done in one of two ways: 

1) three moppets the same 

2) no moppets the same 

If you choose the first option, you are then challenged to 
pick out the moppet that is different and to tell why it is 
different. If you choose the second option, you must tell 
which one is the most different from the others, and why. 

Who Comes Next 

Six moppets are arranged in a row according to one of 
these three patterns: 

1) ABABAB 

2) ABBABB 

3) AABAAB 

Of course, you must observe the traits that make a moppet 
an A or a B. The computer draws only the first five. You 
must choose the four traits of the moppet that comes next 
such as: 

ABABA? 

or 

A B B A B ? 

or 

A A B A A ? 
This is not as easy as it first appears. It is easy when looking 
at A's and B's, but not so easy when viewing Bibbits and 
Gribbits. 

Secret Pal 

If you have played the game of Mastermind, you will find 
this one just as enjoyable. You are asked to create a moppet 
that matches the program's unseen Secret Pal. When your 
moppet has been created trait-by-trait, the computer shows 
how many traits you guessed correctly. However, it does not 
tell you which guesses are correct (only the number of 
correct guesses). The computer then allows you to repeat the 
process until you have correctly created a match for the 
Secret Pal. 

Moptown Map 

This is one of the more complex games. A four-by-four 
matrix of houses is drawn. 

□□an 
nana 

DDDD 
DDDD 

You are asked to place a moppet in each house according to 
neighborhood rules. Each row and each column has two 
rules for its residents. The rules are selected from the four 
moppet traits. Five houses are filled in by the computer to 
provide clues. You must fill in the rest by moving the cursor 
to an empty house and creating a moppet with the proper 
traits conforming to both column and row rules. If your 
moppet doesn't fit, an X appears. You can then try another 
moppet at that house or move the cursor to a different 
house. 

This game is quite challanging and will be enjoyed by 
adults as well as children. 

These descriptions are necessarily short and incomplete, 
but they may give you some idea of the flavor or the 



150 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



TRS-80 COLOR 



OSI 



AARDVARK 
VIC-64 VIC-20 



SINCLAIR 



TIMEX 




QUEST - A NEW IDEA IN ADVENTURE 
GAMESI Different from all the others. 
Quest is played on a computer generated 
map of Alesia. Your job is to gather men 
and supplies by combat, bargaining, explor- 
ation of ruins and temples and outright 
banditry. When your force is strong enough, 
you attack the Citadel of Moorlock in a 
life or death battle to the finish. Playable 
in 2 to 5 hours, this one is different every 
time. 16k TRS-80, TRS-80 Color, and Sin- 
clair. 13K VIC-20. $14.95 each. 




ADVENTURES!!! 

These Adventures are written in BASIC, are 
full featured, fast action, full plotted ad- 
ventures that take 30-50 hours to play. (Ad- 
ventures are interactive fantasies. It's like 
reading a book except that you are the main 
character as you give the computer com- 
mands like "Look in the Coffin" and 
"Light the torch.") 

Adventures require 16k on TRS80, TRS80 
color, and Sinclair. They require 8k on OSI 
and 13 k on Vic-20. Derelict takes 12 k on 
OSI. $14.95 each. 

ALSO FROM AARDVARK - This 
TRS-80 Color and OSI), business 



CATERPILLAR 

O.K., the Caterpillar does look a lot like a 
Centipede. We have spiders, falling fleas, 
monsters traipsing across the screen, poison 
mushrooms, and a lot of other familiar 
stuff. COLOR 80 requires 16k and Joy- 
sticks. This is Edson's best game to date. 
$19.95 forTRS 80 COLOR. 

PROGRAMMERS! 

SEE YOUR PROGRAM IN THIS SPACE!! 

Aardvark traditionally pays the highest com- 
missions in the industry and gives programs 
the widest possible coverage. Quality is the 
keyword. If your program is good and you 
want it presented by the best, send it to 
Aardvark. 

ESCAPE FROM MARS 

(by Rodger Olsen) 
This ADVENTURE takes place on the RED 
PLANET. You'll have to explore a Martian 
city and deal with possibly hostile aliens to 
survive this one. A good first adventure. 

PYRAMID (by Rodger Olsen) 
This is our most challenging ADVENTURE. 
It is a treasure hunt in a pyramid full of 
problems. Exciting and tough I 

HAUNTED HOUSE (by Bob Anderson) 
It's a real adventure— with ghosts and ghouls 
and goblins and treasures and problems — 
but it is for kids. Designed for the 8 to 12 
year old population and those who haven't 
tried Adventure before and want to start 
out real easy. 

DERELICT 
{by Rodger Olsen & Bob Anderson) 
New winner in the toughest adventure from 
Aardvark sweepstakes. This one takes place 
on an alien ship that has been deserted for a 
thousand years — and is still dangerous! 




TUBE FRENZY 

(by Dave Edson) 
This is an almost indescribably fast action 
arcade game. It has fast action, an all new 
concept in play, simple rules, and 63 levels 
of difficulty. All machine code, requires 
Joysticks. Another great game by Dave 
Edson. TRS 80 COLOR ONLY. 16k and 
Joysticks required. $19.95. 




Please specify system on all orders 
is only a partial list of what we carry. We have 
programs, blank tapes and disks and hardware. 



CATCH'EM 

(by Dave Edson) 
One of our simplest, fastest, funnest, all 
machine code arcade games. Raindrops and 
an incredibe variety of other things come 
falling down on your head. Use the Joy- 
sticks to Catch'em. It's a BALLI — and a 
flying saucer! — and a Flying Y!— and so 
on. TRS 80 COLOR. $19.95. 

BASIC THAT ZOOOMMS!! 
AT LAST AN AFFORDABLE COMPILER! 

The compiler allows you to write your 
programs in easy BASIC and then auto- 
matically generates a machine code equiv- 
alent that runs 50 to 150 times faster. 
It does have some limitations. It takes at 
least 8k of RAM to run the compiler and it 
does only support a subset of BASIC— 
about 20 commands including FOR, NEXT, 
END, GOSUB,GOTO, IF, THEN, RETURN, 
END, PRINT, STOP, USR (X), PEEK, 
POKE, *,/,+, -, > , < , =, VARIABLE 
NAMES A-Z, SUBSCRIPTED VARIABLES, 
and INTEGER NUMBERS FORM 0-64K. 
TINY COMPILER is written in BASIC. It 
generates native, relocatable 6502 or 6809 
code. It comes with a 20-page manual and 
can be modified or augmented by the user. 
$24.95 on tape or disk for OSI, TRS-80 
Color, or VIC. 

a lot of other games (particularly for the 
Send $1 .00 for our complete catalog. 



AARDVARK -80 

2352 S. Commerce, Walled Lake, Ml 48088 

(313)669-3110 

Phone Orders Accepted 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. EST. Mon.-Fri. 



% 



Moptown games. As you can see, I have not given away the 
plot in all eleven games. Although these games may seem to 
be on the expensive side, they have much more value than 
typical game software. The educational features of the 
games have been very carefully planned, offering challenges 
for a wide range of age levels. 

The simple graphics used are quite effective, and do not 
detract from the thought processes taking place during the 
game. If you have young children, I highly recommend 
Moptown for your computer library. 

(Follett Library Book Company,4506 N.W. Highway, 
Crystle Lake, IL 60014; Package 1, $40 tape, $45 diskette; 
Package 2, $30 tape, $35 diskette.) 



Software Review,. . 

Two "Donkey" Programs 
Feature Many Great Times 

The hottest new game in the CoCo world are the 
"Donkey" games — patterned after the Donkey Kong that is 
famous in the arcades. The two programs — Dunkey 
Munkey and Donkey King are available from, respectively, 
Intellectronics and Tom Mix Software. 

Both of these games feature a gorilla, a girl yelling for help 
and a workman-like character affectionately named Mario. 
Mario must get from one part of the screen to the other, 
dodging fire, barrels and other assorted goodies thrown 
from above by the gorilla. Once he has, he is in a position to 
rescue the girl. 

Both programs run in 32K, offer sound, music and good 
graphics. Both are in machine code, so are extremely fast. 



GML 




BOOKS & PROGRAMS 
•> SOFTWARE «- 

^"^ ARCADE GAMES ^T^T 
New!!! CRYSTAL REVENGE $16.95 

HI-RES Space War game. The first fully controlled 
color in PMODE 4: You must defend the CRYSTAL HOME 
world from the robot attackers. Planet and multicolor 
attackers remain the same color every game. 

STARFIRE $21.95 

Great machine language version of Defenders. Highly 
rated in the Rainbow. Fast action! 

DUNKEY MONKEY $24.95 - 32K only 

You must rescue the maiden from KING KONG while 
jumping, putting out fires, climbing, etc. Great 
fun. In machine language for 32K systems. 

16K EXTENDED BASIC CASSETTES 



$1.25 Per Order 
Postage & 
Handling 

All Orders Receive 
10% Voucher On Order 




OWL-WARE 

P.O. Box 116 

Mertztown, PA. 

19539 

PA.Res.lnclude6%Tax 



Tom Mix Software 

Donkey King may be the most ambitious arcade game to 
come out for the Color Computer to date. It is so true to the 
arcade version that there is, for all practical purposes, no 
difference between the two. (Maybe Mix should supply a 
cardboard box into which you could place your quarter 
before playing.) Indeed, Donkey King creates a new 
standard from which to judge games of this sort. 

The graphics are absolutely top notch. The sound is 
outstanding. And the play of the game is true to the arcade in 
every respect. 

It is all there — four full screens (barrels, rivets, elevators 
and conveyors). The gorilla actually hurls the barrels down 
at you. The fire changes color when you jump to pick up a 
mallet. Little numbers appear on the screen when Mario 
jumps over barrels and you can get a bonus for completing a 
screen quickly. 

Even the method for placing your name on the scoreboard 
is first rate. And, frankly, scoring is about the only objection 
we have to Donkey King. The game comes with a pre- 
defined set of scores which reassert themselves every time 
you load it in. We wish there were a way to save your own 
score to tape as well. 

But this is certainly a most minor point to a game which 
has it all. Indeed, Donkey King is the king of the donkey 
games and a fantastic rendition of a popular arcade offering. 

Intellectronics 

Dunkey Munkey, against almost any other competition, 
would be a top-choice offering. While it does not have the 
finer points — nor as many screens — as does Donkey King, it 
is a fine game that will provide a great deal of play and 
enjoyment. In fact, the fact that it is somewhat more simple 
to play may make it more suitable foryounger children who 
might be frustrated by the more challenging and complex 
version of this arcade classic. 

Mario has two screens to play with in Dunkey Monkey — 
pop rivets and elevators. The elevators are not as complex as 
in Donkey King, but the scores build higher and faster. Too, 
Mario moves faster in Dunkey Munkey, a sometimes 
enjoyable variation that allows you to get where you are 
going a little more quickly. 

The only real objection we have to Dunkey Munkey is the 
music. It seems that the author has written in a few bars too 
many between screens. After all, you do want to get with the 
action — not listen to music in an arcade game. The music is 
not so long as to be objectionable, but it is a bit annoying 
when you have joystick in hand and are all primed and ready 
to go. 

We believe both games to be good. That Donkey King is 
such an outstanding rendition should not preclude a fine 
piece of work on Dunkey Munkey. The latter merely suffers 
somewhat by comparison. 

(Dunkey Munkey, Intellectronics, 22 Churchill Lane, 

Smithtown, NY 11787, $24.95) 

(Donkey King, Tom Mix Software, 3424 College NE, 

GrandRapids, MI 49505, $24.95tape,$29.95diskplus$l 

P/h) 



Dragon-32 Owners Note 

There area number ofg differences in the way the Dragon- 
32 and the Tandy computers operate. Because of these 
differences, we can give no guarantee that any specific 
program will work without modification. 



152 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



THE COLORQUEST EXPERIENCE 

For the TRS-80C and the TOP System 100 Color Computers 

Written by Kevin HerrboJdt A Tim Nelton 





MM 



BEYOND THE CI M EEON MOON A real-time science fiction adventure game of mind-blowing magnitude — staged in deep space on a 
malign, sentient spacecraft. Written in test machine code with 3-dimensionat high-res graphics and sound. Chooae from 1 myriad of fates. Survive 
the later barrage set up by ■ guanlflel of robot* bent toward* your destruction. 

--;i t Written by Kevin Herrboldl & Ttm Netion JMSV HV\\\UWUP r nmmp*zawmn*un v , 



SOS 



JftMV " i WU\UlUUIIl* r "I III IIJJI ' m zXL*ititttrtfj 
\f WlHWiiV "'(if" &B&f*''ff* " 



A D VE NTU R E TR I LO G Y A Tri logy of quests featuring 3-D high-res graphics in machine code F irst co mes r it u al com bat on t he WORLD 
UNDER THE CI M EEON MOON, to test your worthiness as a warrior Once proven, you will be teteported to DAZ MAR'S UNDERWORLD OF DOOM to 

search for the Eye of Da/mar The FORSAKEN GULCH is the finaf arena, where a wicked idol awaits restoration 




</s. 



THE NIBBLER & MS. NIBBLER A fast maze chase game featuring the nibbler man and three bumbiing preditors. Written in machine 
code and joystick compatible, this fun packed game is enjoyed by all MS. NIBBLER is similar to THE NIBBLER described above but features a 
different maze and MS. NIBBLER for the ladies 






"-.-.^iH^K^y-x 



l'i 



N^' 



• \ ' 



%?jm 



\f^\ 



COMBAT G AMEPAC K 3 action packed games featuring lifelike graphics and sound. EXTENDED BASiC required 2-1 -0 TANK COMBAT 
pits two players against each other in 5 different terrains, STELLAR BATTLE lets you pilot a flexwing fighter through deep space fighting dorian 
squadrons. GALACTIC BLOCKADE is a favorite two- player arcade game of speed and skill 

ORDERING 

ALL GAMES ARE $24.95 for 16K Cassette; $29.95 for 32K Disk. 

Include $3.00 lor shipping in I he U.S. A Canada, $6.00 for Foreign order*. C.O.D. add $2.00 

AVAILABLE AT DEALERS EVERYWHERE. IF NOT, ASK WHY! 

NELSON L 

VEGAS GAM E PACK The thrills of a Las SOFTWARE J IU . 

Vegas casmo al home" Extended BASIC required. SYSTEMS /flMBfc**^ B072 Lyndale Avenue So, 612/881 2777 

CASINO CRAPS, 21. ONE ARMED BANDIT, UP 

AND DOWN THE RIVER, 4 KENO. A bank tracks .. , . 

players winnings from game to game. * Oiv.s.on ol Sofllaw Corporation MmneapOMS. Minnesota S5420 U. S, A. 




jmf 


SI 




wJOWMwa 


fiyft-i 





Education... 

Education and 
The Color Computer 

By 

Dr. Paul Kimmelman 
Assistant Superintendent 

and 

David Macali 

Coordinator of Instructional Services 

Norton (Ohio) City Schools 

Perhaps the most important thing we as educators who 
are using the Color Computer can do is establish a 
sophisticated network. We are proposing in this month's 
column that all educational Color Computer users send us 
the following information: 

A. Computer coordinator's name 

B. School district 

C. Address 

D. Educational uses of Color Computer 

E. Software being used and evaluations of it 

We are suggesting that you mail this information to us 
and we will then compile it for future publication in the 
Rainbow. Hopefully, this will develop a comprehensive, 
educational network of Color Computer users. In addition, 
this will enable us to obtaineducationalreviews of software. 

Dr. Paul Kimmelman, Assistant Superintendent 

Norton City Schools 

4128 S. Cleveland-Massillon Road 

Norton, Ohio 44203 

Educational Software 

The future of the Color Computer appears to be 
extremely bright. I talked to Bill Gattis, Director of Radio 
Shack's Education Division. It is apparent that Radio 
Shack is recognizing the potential of the Color Computer 
for use in schools. While it is too early to be specific, Mr. 
Gattis has assured us that Radio Shack is in the process of 
preparing a variety of its educational material for Color 
Computer use. 

On another Radio Shack note, our preliminary review of 
Color Pilot and Color Logo is extremely exciting, especially 
Logo. There is no question that Radio Shack's move into 
offering Color Logo is a step toward using the computer 
properly in our schools. Logo will enable students to control 
the computer and develop their own programs. While we 
have only taken a preliminary look, what we have seen is 
excellent. Further, Radio Shack currently offers Logo in 
32K disk, but a ROM Pack will be available within the next 
few months. 

Another note of praise needs to be directed toward Follett 
Library Publishing Company. Currently, Follett is 
preparing Bumble Games and Moptown for 16K cassette 
computer use. Our preliminary reviews of these two 
programs are also excellent. Moptown will become an 
extremely popular program for elementary school use. 
What is especially interesting about Moptown is that it 
requires logical thinking and motivates children to identify 
patterns, strategics and differences between objects. 

It is becoming apparent that the Color Computer will be a 
successful component for educational use. Not only Radio 
Shack and Follett, but a variety of other software producers 
are producing materials that are appropriate for student 



utilization and require some innovative or logical thinking. 

In the next few issues of the Rainbow, we hope to begin 
providing the educational users of the Color Computer 
some reviews of what we consider to be the better software 
programs. Our school district's highest priorities at the 
present time include Radio Shack Color Logo, and Follett 
Library Publishing Company Moptown. Each of these 
programs will be available for sale within the next few 
months and we want to encourage school users to make 
them a part of their computer program. 

In conclusion, please be sure to send us the material 
requested at the beginning of this article in order for us to 
develop a Color Computer educational network. /(^ 



Software Review... 

Money Is a Cute, 
Cents-able Program for Children 

Money is the first B5 Software Company program I have 
reviewed, and the fact is that if their other offerings are as 
good as this little program for children, I'm mightily 
impressed. 

Money is a simple, straightforward educational program 
for those little folk just beginning to reach out for practical 
applications of their meager store of worldly knowledge. 
They have learned to count by fives and tens, and with a little 
help and added incentive - both of which are contained in 
this program - they will be able to make the leapf romdigital 
abstraction to concrete achievement of the most practical 
order. 

The loading instructions and commands seem almost 
simple enough for the child to handle by him/ herself. And 
there are five levels of difficulty which ought to be 
conquerable if the child begins at the first level and masters 
each one before moving on. 

Once the level is chosen, circular symbols of various 
colors appear on the screen to represent the coins. Coins are 
arranged in an ascending order according to their value. 
Each row of coins is labeled with that coin's numeric 
equivalent, including a cent sign. In the upper-right corner 
of the screen is an answer box with a permanent decimal 
point. When the child computes the total value of the coins 
appearing on the screen and ENTERs the answer, it appears 
in the box - if correct. Otherwise a beep is sounded and the 
child must try again. 

A series of three problems is given. If all three problems in 
the series are answered correctly, a moon, stars and 
spaceship appear on the screen, and the spaceship rises 
across the screen to land on the moon. If one or more of the 
problems are missed, the spaceship begins an ascent, but 
crashes. The program then returns to the menu where the 
same or new level of difficulty may be selected. I think the 
spaceship routine is a very creative reward system for young 
learners. 

The documentation brochure which accompanies the 
tape is very well done, and even contains a few teaching tips 
to help make the program more meaningful and helpful. 
(B5 Software Company, 1024 Bainbridge Place, 
Columbus, OH 43228, 16K Ext. Basic, $19.95) 

—Courtney Noe 



154 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



NEW/ 



MACRO-BQC 

The Micro Works is pleased to announce the release of 
its disk-based editor, macro assembler and monitor, writ- 
ten for Color Computer by Andy Phelps. THIS IS IT — The 
ultimate programming tool! 

The powerful 2-pass macro assembler features conditional 
assembly, local labels, include files and cross referenced symbol 
tables. Macro-80c supports the complete Motorola 6809 instruction set in 
standard source format. There are no changes, constraints or shortcuts in 
the source language definition. Incorporating all of the features of our 
Rompack-based assembler (SDS80C), Macro-80c contains many more 
useful instructions and pseudo-ops which aid the programmer and add 
power and flexibility. 

The screen-oriented text editor is designed for efficient and easy editing of 
assembly language programs. The "Help Key" feature makes it simple 
and fun to learn to use the editor. As the editor requires no line numbers, 
you can use the arrow keys to position the cursor anywhere in the file. 
Macro-80c allows global changes and moving/copying blocks of text. You 
can edit lines of assembly source which are longer than 32 characters. 

DCBUG is a machine language monitor which allows examining and 
altering of memory, setting break points, etc. 

The editor, assembler and monitor — as well as sample programs — 
come on one Radio Shack compatible disk. Extensive documentation 
included. Macro-80c Price: $99.95 



YOU NEED 
COLOR FORTH!! 

Why? 

•Forth is faster to program in than Basic 
•Forth is easier to learn than Assembly Language 
•Forth executes in less time than Basic 
Forth is a highly interactive language like Basic, with 
structure like Pascal and execution speed close to 
that of Assembly Language. The Micro Works Color 
Forth is a Rompack containing everything you need to 
run Forth on your Color Computer. 

Color Forth consists of the standard FORTH Interest 
Group (FIG) implementation of the language plus 
most of FORTH-79. It has a super screen editor with 
split screen display. Mass storage is on cassette. 
Color Forth also contains a decompiler and other aids 
for learning the inner workings of this fascinating lan- 
guage. It will run on 4K, 16K, and 32K computers. 
Color Forth contains 10K of ROM, leaving your RAM 
for your programs! There are simple words to 
effectively use the Hi-Res Color Computer graphics, 
joysticks, and sound. The 112-page manual includes 
a glossary of the system-specific words, a full 
standard FIG glossary and complete source listing. 
COLOR FORTH ... THE BEST! From the leader in 
Forth, Talbot Microsystems. Price: $109.95 



SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM 

The Micro Works Software Development System (SDS80Q is a complete 6809 editor, assembler and 
monitor package contained in one Color Computer program pack' Vaslly superior to RAM-based 
assemblers/editors, the SDS80C is non-volatile, meaning that if your application program bombs, it can't 
destroy your editor/assembler. Plus it leaves almost all of 16K or 32K RAM free for your program. Since 
all three programs, editor, assembler and monitor are co-resident, we eliminate tedious program loading 
when going back and forth from editing to assembly and debugging 1 

The powerful screen-oriented Editor features finds, changes, moves, copys and much more. All keys have 
convenient auto repeat (typamatic). and since no line numbers are required, the full width of the screen 
may be used to generate well commented code. 

The Assembler features all of the following complete 6809 instruction set: conditional assembly: local 
labels: assembly to cassette tape or to memory: listing to screen or printer: and mnemonic error codes 
instead of numbers 

The versatile monitor is taifored for debugging programs generated by the Assembler and Editor. It 
features examine/change of memory or registers, cassette load and save, breakpoints and more. SDS80C 
Price: $89.95 



MICROTEXT: COMMUNICATIONS 

VIA YOUR MODEM! 

Now you can use your printer with your modem' Your computer can be an 
intelligent printing terminal. Talk to timeshare services or to other personal 
computers: print simultaneously through a second printer port: and re- 
display text stored in memory. Dump to a cassette tape, or printer, or both. 
Microtext can be used with any printer or no printer at all. It features user- 
configurable duplex/parity for special applications, and can send any ASCII 
character. You'll find many uses for this general purpose module 1 Microtext 
is available in ROMPACK. ready-to-use. for $59.95. 



PARALLEL PAINTER INTERFACE — Serial lo parallel converter allows useol a\\ 
standard parallel printers; PI30C plugs into irte ser-tai outpul port, leaving your 
Rompack skU lice. You supply the printer cable. PI80C frice: S69 95 



GAMES 

Star Blaster — Blast your way through an asteroid field in this action-packed Hi-Res graphics game. Available in ROMPACK; requires 16K. Price: $39.95 

Pac Attack — Try your hand at this challenging game by Computerware, with fantastic graphics, sound and action 1 Cassette requires 16K. Price: $24.95 

Berserk — Have fun zapping robots with this Hi-Res game by Mark Data Products. Cassette requires 16K. Price: $24.95 

Adventure — Black Sanctum and Calixto Island by Mark Data Products. Each cassette requires 16K. Price: $19.95 each. 

Cave Hunter — Experience vivid colors, bizarre sounds and errie creatures in hot pursuit as you wind your way through a cave maze in search of gold treasures. This 

exciting Hi-Res game by Mark Data Products requires 16K for cassette version. Price: $24.95 



Also Available: Machine Language Monitor * 2-Pass Disassembler * Memory Upgrade Kits * We Stock 64K Chips 
* Parts and Services * Books * Call or write for information 



THE 



MasterCharge/Visa Accepted 
California residents add 6% tax. 



E ^D©S|© HV~ GOOD STUFF! 

X/V@\&±&^ P.O. BOX 1 1 10, DEL MAR, CA 92014 [619] 942-2400 



PRINT # - 2 , (Continued From Page 8) 

program and system used to help everyone and we hope that 
you will make use of it. As we say, there is no charge for 
doing so whatsoever. This applies not just to clubs and user 
groups, but to any publication that wishes to make use of 
this system. 

You will read elsewhere in this edition about 
RAINBOWfest, but let me make note now that it is 
scheduled for April 22-24 at the Hyatt Regency Woodf ield, 
just outside of Chicago. The hotel is easily accessable by 
highway and close by O'Hare International Airport. In 
addition, Woodfield, the world's largest enclosed shopping 
mall, will offer an attraction for those who don't want to 
spend the whole time at the show. Too, there are special 
rates at the hotel available for RAINBOWfest participants 
and, based on preliminary information, it looks like we will 
have a good turnout of exhibitors. So, mark your calendars 
now. 

By the by, we have some new members of the staff that I 
would like to introduce. 

Jim Reed, our new managing editor, comes to us with a 
long and distinguished record as a writer, editor and 
professional photographer. Jim has held major writing and 
editing responsibilities with the Commonwealth of 
Kentucky and was press secretary to the mayor of 
Louisville. He was also one of the staff members of 
Louisville Magazine and has recently been editor of the 
news bureau at the University of Louisville. Like many of us, 



New! For Your 
Color Computer 

FROG-TREK 

(the arcade game) 

You may be able to guide your frog through 6 lanes 
of rush hour traffic, but that isn 't enough! You 
must also cross the river by jumping on logs and 
turtles to get Froggie safely to his home on the other 
side. But watch out for the snake! And don 't jump 
on the industrial waste. 

A great M/L game at a great price $14,95. Uses hi- 
resolution graphics and requires 16K. Arrows on 
keyboard move frog- no joy-sticks required. 

Send check or money order for $16.50 (includes 
shipping) to: 

OELRICH PUBLICATIONS 
4040 N. Nashville 
Chicago, IL 60634 



Jim was "bitten" by the CoCo bug about a year ago and is 
the proud owner of one of the first TDP-100's to be sold. 
You've seen his byline in the Rainbow for several months 
now and we are pleased and proud that he is joining us. 

Sally Nichols has joined us as our new art director. She is 
a graduate of the University of Louisville's program in fine 
arts and has done quite a bit of commercial work in the area. 
She was one of only a few students chosen to work in 
University Graphics as a student designer and she is the 
person who designed the new format for the Rainbow. Most 
of the things which we will be putting into effect to make 
your magazine more attractive to read will come from 
Sally's ideas. 

Anne Yeiser has also joined us as production coordinator. 
Anne has become a major influence in getting the Rainbow 
out to you on time and in its present form. 

No, we have not made our right-hand helper, Pat Hirsch, 
go it alone while we increased the editorial side staff. Pat, 
frankly, can do most anything, but the volume of what she 
was able to do has been overwhelming. So, if a woman with 
a lilting Australian accent answers the telephone, say "hello" 
to Ivanka Kleier, our customer service manager. Ivanka is 
one of those "let's do it right" people — so you can be sure 
that any needs you have, whether addressed by letter or 
phone call, will be in good hands. 

If, on the other hand, the phone is answered by someone 
without an Australian accent, then it is probably Monica 
Wheat, our research assistant and customer service rep. 
Monica is in charge of keeping track of everything — a 
mammoth job. 

Alice Showalter, our new bookkeeper, will keep things 
straight, moneywise. Alice has a wealth of experience and 
you can be sure that she can help you with a smile. 

I guess we should also mention the other person whose 
name appears on our masthead, Wendy Falk. She's in 
charge of transportation. That's what happens when you 
need a job and have just turned 16. 

As we hope you know, we constantly seek to improve the 
Rainbow. Your input is the primary voice to which we listen. 
In response to your requests, we began Joe Kolar's Basic 
Training last month, a column for pure beginners. It 
contains a wealth of beginner hints, tips and suggestions. 
This month we take that a step further with the addition of 
the redoubtable Dick White to our staff. His new column, 
Bits and Bytes of Basic, is also aimed at the beginner — but 
from a different area. Dick will be writing about optimizing 
Basic programming and what he has to say will, we believe, 
be of interest to most of you. 

Also note Tony DiStefano's new hardware series begins 
this month. We will be carrying Tony's projects and 
supplementing them with contributions from several others, 
such as Ted Hasenstaub this month. Some of these other 
people, such as Ted, will become semi-regular contributors. 

To be honest, all this expansion is possible only because 
we are able to increase the number of pages in each issue. 
You will, I suppose, notice that once again the Rainbow has 
more pages than ever before (1 almost said fatter, but it 
isn't — simply because the new pages are thinner and have 
less bulk). 

This increase in space is possible only because of 
advertising. 1 do want to thank each of you for the help you 
have given us this past year and for being so kind as to 
mention us when you buy software, hardware and other 
products. Please continue to do so. It helps us a great deal 
and, at the same time, makes it possible for us to continue to 
increase the size and scope of your magazine. 

And, you know, all of us here — from me (who, somehow, 
managed to start this whole thing 18 months ago) to Jim 



156 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



JARB 



SOFTWARE 



HARDWARE 



COMPUTER PRODUCTS 



AUX-KEY 

(Auxiliary External Key Board Unit) 

This full size, industrial grade key board 
unit is P.C. Board mounted for trouble 
free operation and years of use. Mounted 
in an attractive aluminum case with a 12 
key numeric pad, Aux-Key comes with a 
long cable for remote location placement 
of your 80C. Requires no soldering to 
your computer, and only about 15 
minutes for installation. Does not affect 
normal operation of your original key 
board. 
Add $4.00 Shipping $134.95 



PEN E ARCADE 

(Light Pen & Arcade System) 

This unique system will allow the light pen 
(included) to be used with supplied soft- 
ware for many tasks normally requiring 
key board input. In education, choose 
answers by just touching pen to correct 
screen location. Can be easily interfaced 
to your own programs. All instructions 
supplied. Also includes the JARB arcade 
target gun and target software. Shoot 
targets from across the room. No other 
unit like this is presently available from 
anywhere else for the 80C or TDP-100 
computers. 
Add $4.00 Shipping $74.95 



COMREX CR-6SOO 

(13" Color Monitor) 

High resolution display monitor produces 
an incredibly sharp image. Includes built- 
in speaker with audio circuit. Compatible 
with virtually any microcomputer. 
$344.95 



COMREX CR-I 

Compact desk-top daisy wheel 
printer, especially designed for word 
processing. Assures high reliability, 
and produces quiet, high quality 
printing. Complete with RS-232 in- 
terface. 
$810.00 



U.S FUNDS ONLY 

C.O.D. ORDERS ACCEPTED 

Sorry, no C.O.D. on printers 

monitors. 

NO CREDIT CARD ORDERS 



and 



• VIDEO INTERFACE KIT 

Allows the composite video signal to be 
interfaced directly to a B/VV or color 
monitor. TV and monitor can be used 
simultaneously. Complete with com- 
prehensive instructions and all parts, in- 
cluding an external sound output. NOTE: 
May not work with monitors requiring 
high input drive - call or write for recom- 
mended monitors, 
$19.95 

rf^\ DUAL 

rainbow JOYSTICK UNIT 

^r (D.J-) 

Single unit assembly enhances playability 
of multi-joystick/player games; conve- 
nient press-to-fire buttons 
Add $4.00 shipping $35.95 

EPSON PRINTERS 

MX80FT/Graftrax + $524.95 

MX100FT/Graftrax+ $699.95 

Serial Interface w/4K Buffer 

Ideal for 80C use $109.95 

80CTOEpsonCable $19.95 

See shipping Info 



NEW PRICES ON 

DATA CASSETTES 

C-OS CIO 

$ .65 QTY 1-10 $ .70 

$ .60 QTY 11-20 $ .65 

Soft Poly Cases Ea. $.20 

Hard Shelled Cases Ea. $.22 

Cassette Labels (12) Sh. $.36 

Cassette Labels Tractor (1000) $30.00 

Call or write for quantity prices on all 
cassette products. Special lengths avail- 
able, eg., C-02, etc. 



NANOS COLOR BASIC 

AND EXTENDED 

SYSTEM REFERENCE 

CARD 

"The New Industry Standard*' 

$4.95 

(We pay postage on this one) 

All types of Nanos cards available 



MEMORY 
UPGRADE KITS 

'4K/I6K MEMORY CHIPSET 

Eight 200 NS 4116 Factory Prime Chips, 
16K Ram Button, and Upgrade Instruc- 
tions. No Soldering. 
$16.95 



•I6K 32K 
MEMORY UPGRADE KIT 

Eight 200 NS 4116 Factory Prime Chips 
with Piggy Backed Sockets, Sam Socket, 
Bus Wire, and 32K Ram Button. Com- 
prehensive Instructions. Recommended 
for "D" or earlier, but may be used on 
U E". Only 9 simple solder connections to 
kit. None to computer. 
$25.95 



*64K RAM CHIPS 

Eight 200 NS Factory Prime 64K RAM 
Chips. Allows you to upgrade "E" board 
easily. No soldering needed. 
$69.95 

^Installation of these items will void the 
Radio Shack warranty. Radio Shack is a 
trademark of the Tandy Corp. 



WABASH DISKETTES 

$25.00 per box of 10 

DISK DOUBLER 

$12.95 



CoCo Chips 

Sam, Pia, CPU, Ext. Basic, 
and 1.1 Standard Available 



We carry products 

from many manufacturers. 

If you don't see it, ask. 



JARB 



SOFTWARE 



HARDWARE 



1636 D Avenue, Suite C 

National City, CA 92050 

(619) 474-6213 



SHIPPING AND HANDLING: Printers 
and monitors add 3<7o. Unless otherwise 
specified, all other orders $2.00 per order. 
California Residents add 6^0 sales tax. 



Reed and Monica Wheat, our newest employees — really do 
consider the Rainbow to be your magazine. I like to think of 
the CoCo world as one big community and that we're just 
the means to tie it together. I think we have an affection for 
CoCo here and I know I view the Rainbow as something a 
little more than just a commercial enterprise. 

We started small and grew with CoCo. And, yes, I like to 
think many of you grew — and willgrow — with us. So, if you 
don't mind my waxing poetic as I close, I'd like to wish you 
all a happy 1983 and paraphrase something I read one time: 

"Grow Along With Me, 7he Best Is Yet To Be!" 

— Lonnie Falk 

Software Review... 

If Pinball's Your Game 
Nova's the Name 

Pinball, the premier coin-operated game machine. I can 
remember not having a single TV set in my hometown. I can 
remember having to ride 25 miles with my parents to go to a 
movie, mainly because it had that new marvel — air 
conditioning. I can remember penny postcards and our old 
outhouse, too. But, I can't remember life without pinball. 

Now, with Nova-Pinball, we have that old favorite in its 
latest form video pinball. Wat is it about pinball? I mean 
right from the earliest machines, we've never had much 
control over the ball. Aside from working a couple of 
flippers and lifting and shaking the machine a little, it's 
always been mostly a matter of luck. Yet, we slip a coin in, 
pull the plunger back, each in our own unique, patented 
style, and launch the steel ball and ourselves into adventure 



r 



PARENTS & TEACHERS 



""N 



of children ages 3 to 8 
Software written by School Director to utilize computer 
as an aid in teaching Early Childhood Concepts. Puts 
fun & excitement into learning. 

Requires 16K ext. basic & Joysticks. 

COMPUTER LITERACY $14.95 

Introduces computer age terms & concepts to parents & teachers. Audio/visual. 

CREATE $9.95 

Use of colors & sounds fascinates all ages. Uses Joysticks to DRAW. 

HAND/EYE COORDINATION $14.95 

Guide spaceship thru maze. 13 learning levels. Challengetoallages. 

RECOGNITION $14.95 

Child learns to recognize "like" figures. 2 separate games. Many learning levels 

Following Programs USE VOICE RECORDED 
EXPLANATIONS & GAMES IN FUN & EXCITING WAY: 

PERCEPTION $14.95 

Teaches antonyms, i.e. left/right, first/last, etc. 

NUMBER CONCEPTS $14.95 

Teaches meaning of numbers. 

ADDITION CONCEPTS $14.95 

Teaches basic arithmetic skills. 

20% discount for 3 or more programs; $75 for all 7 programs. 

Send Certified Check or money order for immediate delivery; otherwise 

2 weeks. 



v_ 



PROGRAMS BY MR. BOB 

P.O.BOX94 
MONTROSE, CA 91020 



rf^i 



land. We've all seen the pinball "high," a transfixed human 
being seems handcuffed to a machine, his eyes glazed over, 
multi-hued lights flashing in his face, the sound of bells 
ringing in his ears, and every now and then what appears to 
be involuntary muscle spasms as he attempts to exert a little 
more control over his fate. With the skill that comes only 
from practice, the pinball addict can make his flight of 
fantasy last sometimes for hours. 

For some people, the very raison d'etre was to play 
pinball, but even those of us who weren't totally addicted 
usually had our favorite machine. Mine was Lady Luck and 
it had an attractive drawing of a very healthy-looking 
blonde who must have been a cousin of the RC Cola 
calendar girl. She had a come hither look that always got to 
me. People do become emotionally involved with machines, 
you know. 

Just think, now I can carry my favorite pinball game in my 
shirt pocket, next to my heart. Of course, Lady Luck may 
have a few wrinkles now, but I couldn't help thinking of her 
while watching the Rainbow editor clutching his trusty 
CoCo by the sides, totally immersed in Nova-Pinball. His 
fingers were on the "down-arrow" and "clear" keys (Nova's 
flipper buttons) and his arms were stretched out in that 
classic stance as the bells rung and the lights flickered across 
his face. A video game library isn't complete without 
pinball. 

Too bad that Nova-Pinball doesn't have a "tilt" feature, 
because Lonnie would have triggered it for sure the way he 
was "getting into" the game. It does have bumpers and 
thumpers and ball kickers that racked up all sorts of points 
which Lonnie readily took credit for, even though I don't 
think muttering "U ngh," "Acht" and "Be there! " has all that 
much effect on the video screen — unless you also manage to 
pull a cord loose. 

Nova-Pinball is a cute little game simple enough for an 
editor to play. It's in machine language and requires 16K. 
(Bumblebee Software, P.O. Box 25427, Chicago, IL 
60625, $20 on tape.) Jim Reed 

Software Review... 

Mega-Bug Magnifies 
Difficulty, Fun! 

Of the several people I've observed playing Mega-Bug, 
most have the same initial reaction: "Hey, this magnifying 
glass doesn't help; it just makes it harder! This would be a lot 
easier without the magnifying glass." Very perceptive. And, 
doubtless true. Pin the Tail on The Donkey would be a lot 
easier without the blindfold, too, but the prospect of 
"pinning your tail in the wrong place" is what makes both 
games fun. 

Mega-Bug, a 16K ROMPAC maze game from Radio 
Shack, is sort of a Mexican second cousin to Pac Man, the 
way I figure it. There's a cute rendition of "La Cucaracha"at 
the beginning. That's appropriate when you remember that 
"cucaracha" is, of course, Spanish for cockroach. I mean, 
how many other songs about bugs can you name? Anyway, 
the music has a Spanish harmony about it, too. On the other 
hand, the bugs speak English, as you will find out the first 
time they get you, and that'll happen quickly enough. By the 
way, for a good look at how Mega-Bug looks on the screen, 
refer to last month's Rainbow, page 11, for a big color 
picture. 

The idea is simple. Run through the maze, chewing up 
white dots as you go and leaving green dots — sort of a trail 
of crumbs — behind you. The bugs — eight of them to start 
with — meander about until they find your green dots which 



158 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



they find tasty. So, they eat the green dots and, in the 
process, you, too, if you happen to be loitering around the 
next corner. If you're alert, you'll see them in plenty of time 
to outrun them, but here's the catch: Watch out or you'll find 
yourself being chased into a dead-end that'll live up to its 
name. 

The really unhandy thing about the magnifying glass — 
which, in case you haven't seen a picture in a Radio Shack 
flyer or catalog, is moving inset which shows an enlarged 
view of the section of the maze you happen to be in at the 
time — is that just when you begin to get cocky, you find a 
cockroach is hot on your heels and you're trapped like an 
Orkin man with a clogged spray valve. As they dance the 
"Revenge on Raid" Rhumba and yell, "We gotcha," you're 
the one who goes belly up. 

With some practice, though, you'll manage to clear a 
screen of all the white dots without getting bugged. Your 
reward? What else, a tougher maze, more bugs, and you're 
the bugbait. 

Mega-Bug is easy to learn to play. We found it played well 
on either the keyboard or the joysticks. At the top of the 
screen, you can check your elapsed time and, at the bottom, 
your running score. Your running score will improve as you 
learn to circle around, double back and otherwise lay false 
trails of yummy green crumbs. 

Mega-Bug is by Steve Bjork and is licensed to Tandy 
through Datasoft, Inc. Again, Steve has developed an 
enjoyable, colorful game, and the convenience of the 
ROMPAC format is unbeatable. Nonetheless, Steve will 
agree this is one program that will never be bug-free. 
(Radio Shack, nationwide, Catalog #26-3076, $34.95) 

Jim Reed 



Software Review... 

Laser Tank Provides 
A Formidable Challenge 

The fact is, Yank, that if you're going to protect the 
American Eagle from the enemy tanks, and keep their 
deadly lasers from crisping your bird right down to a greasy 
wishbone, you'd better start fast-tracking the moment you 
come on screen. 

The problem here is that the enemy tanks have advanced, 
total-computer technology, while you have human decision- 
making and motor responses integrated into yours. Not to 
mention slightly delayed joystick responses. Nevertheless, 
Laser Tank is fun. 

Though the program's name is similar to Laser Tank 
Duel, the Renaissance Game Designs offering we reviewed 
in your December issue of the Rainbow, the two games are 
sufficiently different that owning one wouldn't eliminate the 
other as a possible acquisition. 

The object of Laser Tank is to defend your symbolic eagle 
(bottom of screen) from attacking enemy tanks. If in the 
process of defending the eagle you lose four tanks, or the 
computer's tanks shrink-wrap your bird with a blast of 
mega-light, you lose. 

Both warring factions must wander a maze of corridors in 
their attempt to attack and destroy, but can pierce the walls 
with their lasers to take short-cuts when nescssary. If an 
enemy tank destroys you, you will appear elsewhere in the 
maze and the game will continue. Your tank and laser are 
controlled by the right joystick and fire-button. 
(K & K Computorware, 37326 Gregory Drive,Sterling 
Heights, MI 48077, 16K Ext. Basic, $14.95) —Courtney Noe 




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Running at 9600 Baud greatly increases the printing speed of some printers. 

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4949 HAMPSHIRE 

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Dealer inquiries invited 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 



159 



Software Review... 

These Two Programs An 
Arachniphiliac's Delight 

Recently, I spent part of my morning playing with spiders, 
and though the thought of such a creepy pastime might be 
enough to make a good arachniphobe's skin crawl, I found 
the experience captivating. 

The '"spiders" spun out of my CoCo from two separate 
"webs;" Spider Attack, from Hume Design, and The Spider, 
from Chromatic Software. 

Spider Attack, which uses machine language sub- 
routines, and gives you a choice of normal or double CPU 
speeds, is much like Space Invaders, with spiders taking the 
role of descending aliens. Even at double-speed, it's still 
fairly easy to roam across the bottom of your screen zapping 
spiders with your laser, until the red ones begin spitting 
poisonous venom at you. They're pretty good at this, and 
since you must be directly beneath one to hit it with your 
laser, it's quite possible to to take a shrivelling shower of 
spider spit before you can make him see the light. Also, 
watch out for the blue spiders. If you stop directly beneath 
one, he can paralyze you and crawl down to catch you in his 
killing grasp. 

You get at least five tries to rack up points before the 
spiders kill you for good and the game ends. If you reach 
1000 points before losing your fifth life, you will be rewarded 
by having all five lives returned to you. Your laser is 
controlled by the right joystick, and I felt the responsiveness 
was generally good. 

Spider Attack has good graphics and decent sound 
effects; I found it a worthwhile game. 

Not wishing to weave any tangled webs by attempting to 
deceive anyone, I must admit that I personally preferred the 

FUNDS AND STOCKS? 



T 



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IMPOSE A GRAPH OF ANOTHER FUND FOR COMPARISON/ 
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second of these eight-legged, action-packed offerings - The 
Spider. 

The Spider is an all-machine-language program with very 
good sound, excellent graphics and super action. 

You zoom along through a vividly-colored tunnel that's 
loaded with exceptionally realistic spiders, attempting to 
align them with your laser scope and blast them before they 
get you. I found it quite difficult to hit them, as my point 
display disconcertingly reminded all who watched, but then 
it takes these wicked web-wenders awhile to annihilate you 
the alloted five times, as well. I found this to my liking, 
because I enjoyed the prolonged action. You use the right 
joystick to manipulate the cross-beam of your scope, and, of 
course, the fire button to activate your laser. The point 
system is adequately explained in the documentation, so I 
needn't go into that here, except to say that if you manage 
500 points you'll receive an extra life to devote to battling 
these belicose little beasties. 

There's one more point I'd like to add here, and that is 
that, even though it wasn't mentioned in the documentation, 
playing The Spider while wearing a pair of 3-D glasses gives 
one of the best dramatic-depth effects I've yet seen. You lose 
some of the vivid colors by doing so, but then you can always 
take them off whenever you want and go back to playing the 
straight game. 

(The Spider, Chromatic Software Co., 50 Fillmore 
St.,Dayton, OH 45410, $19.95; Spider Attack,l\ume 
Design, Dept. E, 4653 Jeanne Nance St., Montreal, 
Quebec, Canada, $14.95) 

— Courtney Noe 

Software Review Update 



Now, A More 
Flexible FLEX 



By Dr. Laurence D. Preble 

The Color Computer is growing up. These pages are 
seeing expanding numbers of business software reviews for 
the TRS-80C. FLEX is a general purpose disk operating 
system previously available only on mainframe MC6809 
computers. In recent months, Spectral Associates, Frank 
Hogg Labs, Inc., and Data Comp have offered versions of 
FLEX for the Color Computer. 

In the August issue of the Rainbow, I discussed the 
features available in Data Comp's FLEX. The only real 
disappointment at the time was the lack of communication 
between Radio Shack's Disk Operating System and FLEX. 
I weep no more! Data Comp's version 2.1 has bridged the 
communications gap. 

New utility programs are included which allow writing 
and reading Radio Shack disks from the FLEX operating 
system. Also, a patch to Radio Shack's Extended Color 
Basic is included to allow the reading and writing of files on 
a FLEX disk. 

New features have been added to the high resolution 
graphics screen. The 51 character by 24 line display works 
faster! You get upper and lower case, a bell sound, 
addressable cursor and many of the commands available on 
high priced video terminals. 

It is now easier to get into FLEX from Radio Shack Basic. 
A single bootable disk is created with a utility called 
MAKESYS. Insert the boot disk into drive 0. Type RUN 
"FLEX." FLEX announces its presence with a sign-on 
message. The nice part is that the boot disk does not have to 
be removed. There is plenty of room on it for FLEX 
programs. 

Keep up the good work folks! IBM and Apple, move 
over! 



160 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



THE TRS 80 USERS JIIRML 



If you own a TRS-80® Model I, Model II, 

Model III, the Color Computer, or the new 

Pocket Computer, YOU NEED 80-U.S.! 

(1 The 80-U.S. Journal has 

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M Every issue contains several Basic or machine 

language program listings. It contains Business 
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are, there is something for YOU in the Journal! 

and... 

The Journal contains reviews of hardware and software. Our "Evaluation 
Reports" will help you make the best choice in selecting additions to your 
system. 

Save Over 50% 

You can save over 50% off the cover price of 80-U.S. Journal. For the 
remarkably low price of only $ 16.00, a savings of $20.00 (cover price), you 
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BONDS, if you enclose payment with your order, you will receive an 
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Software Review... 

Solo Pool, 
Fun You Can Bank On 

"Two-rail, bank shot in the side pocket— left handed." 
Calling your shots can be a gas with Solo Pool, which, 
despite the name, can be for one or two players. Making the 
shot can draw a gasp from over-the-shoulder onlookers, 
too. Just don't let on you haveselected the easiest of the four 
levels of difficulty available with this entertaining and easy 
to play video version of pool. You've got to know your 
angles, though. 

In Solo Pool, one ball at a time is in play. It's placed 
randomly and point values are assigned to the six pockets, 
depending on their distancef rom, and angle to, the ball. You 
adjust your cue stick position and take aim by placing a 
small cross hair behind the ball, and then hit the "fire" 
button on your joystick to shoot. Of course, there are certain 
problems. For instance, the closer your cross hair is to the 
ball, the less distance it will travel; if you're too close, the ball 
won't reach the hole. And* sometimes, you can't get far 
enough behind the ball to have a playable shot. No leaning 
on the table and no foul language allowed. This is a 
respectable pool hall. In fact, for an extra touch of class, 
Solo Pool treats you to a short rendition of "The 
Entertainer" from the movie "The Sting, "which, in case 
you've been in absententia or incommunicado, is a motion 
picture about "hustling," something you'll be doing once 
you get the hang of Solo Pool. 

Since Solo Pool is in Basic, you might want to toy around 
with it and turn it into bumper pool if you have more 
memory than the 16K it requires— easier to say than do, 
though. Besides, Tom Mix or his pool shark, John Fraysse, 
are probably way ahead of you and doing it already. They're 
hustlers. 

(Tom Mix Software, 3424 College N.E., Grand Rapids, 
MI 49505, $17.95) 

-Jim Reed 



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Software Review... 

This Bug's 
A Doodle Dandy 

Wow! I really think they've done it. No more comparing 
maze games with Pac Man, because Doodle Bug is better 
than Pac Man! Doodle Bug has it all: great color, great 
sound, great action. It has created a sensation here at the 
Rainbow and will probably have to be banned from the 
premises just to maintain production schedules. Yes, it's that 
good. 

Incase I haven't made myself clear, Doodle Bug is terrific. 
The most marvelous feature is that you can slam gates 
behind you and get away from enemy bugs. The game plan 
calls for grazing along, eating white dots and assorted 
vegetables and other key items — if they're the right color 
when you get to them — all the while avoiding the roaming 
enemy bugs and steering clear of the stationary skulls, which 
are poisonous. Anybody who's ever held a joystick should 
know what to do: eat without being eaten. But, oh, those 
wonderful gates. You see, about half of the walls of the maze 
are made of revolving panels which let you through but 
won't admit enemy bugs. You can have several right on your 
tail and slam a gate in their faces. 

The extra features are many and varied and provide a 
continuing challenge once you've grown accustomed to the 



162 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



magnificent feeling of power that you get from scooting 
through those gates one step ahead of destruction. Not only 
that, but the gates can be shoved around in turnstile fashion 
to close off normally open passages when the need arises, 
which is about once every ten seconds. Doodle Bug is in 
machine language and requires 16K. 

In addition to all sorts of bonus-points opportunities and 
chances to get a new supply of ladybugs (your alter ego), 
there are such features as a freeze-action for time-out. J ust in 
case you're wondering, yes, eat all the dots and you go to a 
new sequence with different enemy bugs which come out 
quicker, and eating vegetables gets you more points than the 
previous screen. 

At the moment, nine-year-old Tracy Hirsch is watching 
while her 12-year-old sister, Lisa, is absolutely going to 
town. I can't even get Lisa to quit playing longenough to tell 
me what she likes about Doodle Bug. Personally, this 
reviewer gives it a perfect 10. It's a superior, arcade-quality 
graphics game. 

(COMPUTERWARE, Dept. C, Box 668, Encinitas, CA 

92024, $24.95 for tape, or $29.95 for disk) 

Jim Reed 



Software Review... 

Three-Game Pack 
Is Mostly Fun 

This three-game package from Century Software 
contains two arcade-style games with nicely-done graphics, 
and an Adventure that I thought had well-prepared 
responses and a number of other features to aid your 
enjoyment. 

The first of the series, Moon Lander, drops you out of 
moon orbit onto one of three landing pads on the surface. 
The difficulty in landing varies according to several factors, 
and points are awarded accordingly. You have a choice of 
gravity levels, and while the lightest gravity level is the 
easiest for maneuvering, it uses up the most fuel, and you 
receive fewer points for successfully positing your Lander 
upon the chosen pad. Also, the landing pads are located in 
areas of greatly varied difficulty for maneuvering. Especially 
since there seems to be a bit of play in thejoystick command. 
The least accessable pad offers the most points. The game is 
over if you crash five times or run out of fuel. Have fun, but 
watch your joystick control, and before you attempt your 
CLOAD to the moon be sure to PC LEAR 6. 

The other graphics game in this trio is called Balloons. 
The object of this game is to pop the falling balloons on the 
clown's head by guiding him directly beneath them using the 
joystick control. If a balloon gets by your clown, it definitely 
gives him a "sinking feeling." Popped balloons rack up 
points, and if you clear a level of balloons you are awarded 
an extra clown. Occasionally, after you clear a level you are 
rewarded with a bonus level. 

The adventure game in this series is called An Unexplored 
Mansion. In this adventure, the object is to find the hidden 
fortune, which is secreted somewhere within the mansion 
estate. The documentation for this one gives you a list of 
usable verbs. As the game requires a lot of memory, you will 
have to do a couple of POKEs before CLOADing. 
(Century Software, 1649 Geneva Ave. No., St. Paul, MN 
55119, 16K Ext. Basic, $11.95) 

- Courtney Noe 



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January, 1983 the RAINBOW 163 



Graphics... 



Here 



Nothing's So Constant 
As Unlimited Change 

By Ed Pollard 

is another random graphics 




16K 

ECB I 



program that 
incorporates constant use of RND to assure ever changing 
and never-the-same patterns and designs. 

You will note that the first line ensures that you are not 
starting with the same design as the last time you "powered 
up" your machine. 

Although you may have a deadline or appointment to 
keep, or other excuse to turn it off after a while, you will be 
tempted to waitfor "just one more pattern".. ..Thiscould last 
for hours! ^ 

The program runs in three phases: ^s^ 

1) The weaving lines 4od End 

2) The "growing" circles | 

3) The random circles 

All of these actions are mixed with the most important 
function of the program, hence the function responsible for 
the overall effect. This is the constant and random changing 
of both PMODE, SCREEN, and COLOR. 

This program has been tested on various groups (usually 
at parties), and provides a nice background. Especially when 
there is music playing (although it is not syncronized). 
The listing: 

10 SY=RND (-TIMER) 

20 CLS7 : PR I NT@236 , " GR AFX X X " ; : PR I 

NT6265, "BY ED POLLARD" 5 

30 FORI=1TO5000:NEXT 



JPHhb 



■ JUMPS . 

Q-SOFT's challenging version of a very old European 
solitaire game by the name of Hl-Q. An ADDICTIVE board 
game in HI-RES graphics. A game for ages 3-99. Also 
available in 4K. ^ 

Cassette: 16K E.C.B $14.95 

Cassette: 4K C.B ,, $12.95 

. TIC-TAC-TOE - 

If you thought Tic-Tac-Toe is an easy game, try 
matching your wits against this version. Play it with or without 
joysticks. A special "SMALL FRY" level of difficulty is 
provided for those "SMALL PROGRAMMERS" in your house. 
Cassette: 16K Reg. Basic $7 4.95 

- CONVERSIONS • 

NEW" A 6-way menu driven conversion program that 
will convert DECIMAL TO BINARY and vice versa. 
HEXADECIMAL TO DECIMAL and vice versa, and BINARY 
TO HEXADECIMAL and. .vice versa. A REAL HANDY-DANDY 
PROGRAM FOR YOUR CO-CO. ^ ^ nr 

Cassette- 16K E.C.B $70.95 

- DICE • 

The program displays on your screen two dice in HI- 
RES, graphics. Press any key and CO-CO will roll you another 
set of dice. Great for all kinds of board games. A GREAT 
BARGAIN!! „, e ^ 

Cassette: 16K E.C.B $ 5.95 

Q-SOFT 
1006ROBINHOOD DRIVE • PAINESVILLE, OHIO 44077 ^=^ 
C.O.D. orders add $3.00 call 216-352-2675 ^™ 



SI 



J 



40 POKE65495,0*USE THIS LINE ONL 
Y IF YOUR COMPUTER CAN HANDLE IT 

(SPEED UP POKE) 
50 I FPEEK ( 1 6057 ) < >50THENCLEAR200 
, 16048: F0RI=33465T033566: POKE I -1 
7408, PEEK ( I ) : NEXTELSE90 
60 FORI=0TO2:POKE16061+I, 18: NEXT 
1:1=16158 

70 P0KEI,38:P0KEI+l,3:P0KEI+2, 12 
6: POKEI+3, 131 : POKEI+4, 34: POKEI+5 
, 126 

80 POKEI+6, 164:P0KEI+7,76 
90 P0KE41 1,62: RUN 100 
100 PM0DE4, l: SCREEN 1, 1 : PCLS 
110 FOR F=l TO RND (10) 
120 PMODE RND (5) -1, l: SCREEN 1 , RN 
D(2)-l 

130 COLOR RND (9) -1, RND (9) -1 
140 S1=RND(10)+1 

150 FOR X=l TO 255 STEP S1:Y=1:X 
1=1: Y1=191-(X/ 1.33508) :LINE(X,Y) 

-(XI, yd ,pset:nextx 

160 FOR X=l TO 255 STEP SI :X 1=25 

5: y1 = x/ 1.33508: line (x,y)- (xi, yd 
,pset:nextx 

170 FOR XI =255 TO 1 STEP- S1:X=2 
55: Y=191-X 1/1. 33508: Y1=191:LINE( 
X,Y)-(X1, YD ,pset:nextxi 
180 FOR Xl=255 TO 1 STEP -S1:X=1 
: Y=X 1/1. 33508: Yl=191: LI NE(X,Y)-( 

XI, YD ,pset:nextxi 

190 fori9=1to1000:nexti9: pmode r 

nd (5) -1,1: screen1 , rnd (2) -1 : f0ri9 

=itoi000:nexti9 

200 NEXTF 

210 FOR L=l TO RND (10): PMODE RND 
(5) -1 , 1 : SCREEN1 , RND (2) -1 : C=RND (9 
)-l: COLOR RND (9) -1, RND (9) -l: FOR 
R= 1 TO RND (100) : CIRCLE (128, 96) , 

r,c:nextr:nextl 

220 FOR E=l TO RND ( 10) : X=RND (255 
) :Y=RND( 191) : PMODE RND (5) -1, DSC 
REEN1 , RND (2) -1 : C=RND (9) -1 : C1=RND 
(9)-l:C0L0R RND(9)-l,RND(9)-l:CI 
RCLE ( X , Y) , RND ( 100) , C 
230 PAINT ( X, Y) , CI, C: NEXTE: GOTOl 1 

Software Review... 

Jumps Is 
A Lively Solitaire 

Jumps is a game which proves once again that you don't 
always need a lot of complex interplay and fast action to be 
good; that CoCo provides an excellent adaptive form for 
popular old board games; and that folks with 4K machines 
can have access to some very good software. 

I know that I had at least three versions of this board-and- 
peg game while I was growing up, and never tired of 
retrieving it on a day slack of baseball or friends, until too 
many pegs were lost to make it a challange. If only I could 
have stored it on cassette tape, instead of under my bed or 



164 



the RAINBOW 



1983 



some other game-eating location where cats and dustmops 
intrude! 

I'm sure most of you have played such a game at some 
time or other (even with a few lost pegs), but a brief 
description of the game, as Q Soft has it, appears to be in 
order. 

First of all, good color, sound and graphics belie the 
smidgeon of storage required to produce this addictive 
diversion. Once CLOADed you get a very nicely done 
introductory screen, which is a strong hint that considerable 
care has gone into the preparation of Jumps. 

Next, there appears a full, top view of the "board and 
pegs," with an "open hole" in the center of the board. 

The object of the game is to jump one peg at a time (you 
land in an open hole and the computer removes the jumped- 
pegforyou) until either you have just one pegremaining, or 
you have no more possible jumps. To do this, you use the 
keyboard arrows to place a cursor on the peg you wish to 
have jump, press ENTER, move the cursor to an open hole 
one peg away from the jumping peg (on either a vertical or 
horizontal line - no diagonal jumps allowed) and 
pressENTER once again. When no more jumps are possible, 
press N and a new screen will appear, ready for another 
game of Jumps. 

That's all there is to it. Simple, fun and, I might add, for 
the price, a very good buy. 

(Q Soft, 1006 Robinhood Drive, Painesville, OH 44077, 
$10.95) 

— Courtney Noe 

Software Review... 

Sub-Mission Dives, 
But Still Floats 

Deciding how I felt about Sub-Mission nearly whipped 
me into submission. However, after playing it awhile, I 
finally adjusted to the problems it was giving me (purely sub- 
jective ones, I think), found the difficulty level that best 
suited my personal proclivities and talents, and warmed to 
my role as submarine commander. 

Once I determined how the game worked, such as how 
deep your sub can dive and where "near the sub's tail" was 
the all-important hatch, I found level one to be much too 
easy for any enjoyment. I then moved immediately on to 
level three, where I was inevitably blown out of the water 
whenever I approached my first objective. I settled on level 
two, by default, and found it to be more my niche. 

At this point I suppose I should say just what the objective 
of this game is that I found best attempted in level two. It is 
to retrieve the "secret boxes" lying on the ocean floor, 
without being destroyed by the stationary mines. 

Using the right joystick control, you must submerge your 
boat, avoid the mines, and at the proper instant fire the 
joystick button to haul in the box. As you can guide your sub 
up, down and forward, but not in reverse, it can be easy to 
miss a box as you make your pass. Retrievingit gives you 10 
points, getting blown away costs you 10 points and adds 
them to the enemy's score. The game is over when the red 
time line travels the width of the screen to the right border. 

Sub-Mission has fairly-good sound, including blast 
noises and sonar bleeps, and good graphics. An enemy ship 
sits on the surface, adding much to the graphics, but doing 
no damage, except as the source of the depth charges in level 
three. 

(HIB, 3505 Hutch Place, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 16K 
Ext. Basic, $12.95) 

— Courtney Noe 



I© PgjjjiTJtjl SoftWCJifT© 



COLOR TERM + PLUS + Look al these features: 
Operates at 1 10-19200 HA III): Half or Full Duplex; I or 2 
stop bits; odd, even, or no parity; send and receive 
BASK 1 & Machine Language programs; word wrap; Edit 
Buffer; ('ode & Decode buffer using a user defined key 
word; save and load buffer to tape. + PLUS + much 
more! 
Kik or :?2k Reg, or Kxt. BASIC, PKICK $29.95 (lape)* 



TAPENAME Tapename searches tape and stores the 
name of any program or file. You can print the informa- 
tion to the 1 screen, printer or tape. Also checks for load 
errors. 4k, Kik, or.'J2k Keg. or kxt. 
MASK 1 . PRICK $7.95 (lapcj* 



COLOR DISK SAVER Saves a disk to tape. Reloads 
disk from saved tape. Also has tape verify command! 
32k Kxt. BASIC Reg. PRICE $12.95 (tape)** 



COLOR I AGO Based on popular Othello game. Match 
wits with your computer! Uses high res color graphics. 5 
levels of difficulty. .Joysticks required. 
Kik or :!2k Kxt. BASIC. PRICK $15.95 (tape) 



CLONE ATTACK Blast those nasties as they appear! 3 
skill levels and 9 levels of difficulty. Uses high res color 
graphics. .Joysticks required, lb'k or .'32k Ext. BASIC on- 
ly. PRICK $15.95 (tape) (Disk ;32k only) 
[Special :S2k version $2.00 extra] 



MOON BASE INVASION Nuclear bombs are nearing 
your cities! Can you stop them before they reach you? 
Kik or 32k Kxt. BASIC Req. High res graphics. 
PRICK $12.95 (tape) 



— NEW PROGRAMS- 
COLOR BIORHYTHUM Are you up or down today, 
tomorrow, or years from now? Find out with COLOR 
BIORHYTHUM. Uses high res graphics. Send the chart to 
printer. Kik or :J2k Kxt. BASIC Req. 
PRICK $14.95 (tape) 



DD CLOCK Don't forget what time it is when you are 
programming. Tin* time is displayed in the upper right 
corner of your screen. Shows hours, minutes and 
seconds. Beeps every hour. 4k, l(>k, or 32k. 
PRICK $9.95 (tape)*' Kxt BASIC not required. 



Use your MODEM for something other than a 

dust catcher — play games! 
MODEM CHESS Use your Modem and your Color 
Computer to play chess over the phone! Has high res col- 
or graphics hoard and pieces. Make your move, select, a 
message 1 to send, press a button — seconds later your op- 
ponent's hoard is updated automatically. Has audio 
alerts, lot's you know when a move* is being made. Kik 

>r.32k Kxt. BASK 1 m» t| . PRICK $39.95 (tape) 



MODEM CHECKERS Play checkers over the phone! 
Program allows up to 4 jumps to be made at a time, 
crown pieces, etc. 16k or 32k Kxt. BASK" Req. 
PRICK $39.95 (tape)" 



MODEM IAGO Play our version of Othello over the 
phone! Make your move, press a key, your opponent's 
board is updated seconds later! Has a takeback key if 
you decide you don't like the move you made. 
'lHk or ;*2k Kxt. BASIC Req. PRICK $39.95 (|.ape)** 



Most programs are Disk compatible. Specify Disk when 
ordering and add $5.00 per program. Save money and 
ask that all ordered programs be loaded on one disk. You 
pay only for the one disk! Please add $2.00 shipping and 
handling on all orders. Texas residents add 5% sales tax. 
Allow two weeks for personal checks. Your order will 
usually be shipped within two to three days. We will 
notify you of any problems within one week. Send 
orders to: DOUBLE DENSITY SOFTWARE, 920 Bald 
win Street, Denton, Texas 7r>201. Phone 817/56H-2004. 
We are looking for quality software. If you have a pro- 
gram you think is a winner, send it to us. If it meets our 
standards, you will be paid TOP royalties. 

* Machine Language. 

* ""Machine Language Subroutines. 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 165 



Utility.. 




64K Conversion? Now What? 

By Jorge Mir 



If you recently converted your Color Computer to 64K 
you probably asked yourself the same questions most of us 
did: What do I do with it now that I have 64K? 

If you have been reading articles devoted to 64K, you 
undoubtedly have realized that there is a world of new 
software out there which you never dreamed could be 
adapted to the Color Computer. But, you must have also 
realized that the additional software available is quite 
expensive, since it is devoted mainly to business 
applications. 

What attracted me to 64K was the additional RAM 
available above the Disk ROM. There is almost 8K of RAM 
there for the taking. However, I soon realized that it was not 
that easy to use for Basic programs. I wanted to use that 
extra space for storing string data, but I finally gave up since 
I could not find an easy way of doing it. 

However, I came up with the idea that if I located my 
Basic programs in that area, I could then have all of the low 
32K RAM available for storage, thus effectively making the 
Color Computer a 40K machine for Basic programs! Again, 
I was faced with more problems. Basic programs just cannot 
be loaded directly into that area. I kept getting "out-of- 
memory" error messages. 

So, I came up with a program that will change the target 
basic program, relocate it to the upper 32K, and then 
execute it. Listed below is the latest version of this program. 

Here is how to use it: 

First, make sure your computer is in the PCLEAR4 
mode. This is the mode at power up, but if you want to make 
sure, just type PCLEAR4 and press ENTER. 

You then load your basic program and make the changes 
to the dimension statements so it can handle more data than 
before. Don't forget, you now have 40K of RAM available! 

For example, if your original program had a "CLEAR 
20000" you can now "CLEAR 27000." 

Next, you must change the Basic Pointers so that you can 
load "BASIC64K." You do this by typing the following: 

POKE 25, PEEK(27): POKE 26, PEEK(28): NEW 
ENTER 

You can now load "BASIC64K" and type "RUN." 

The program will accomplish the following: 

1) Transfer Basic, Extended Basic and Disk ROM to the 
upper 32K of RAM and then switch to the 64K RAM mode. 

2) Change all program step references in your program so 
that it runs in the upper 32K section. 

3) Transfer your program to the upper 32K section, 
starting at &HE000. 

4) Change Basic Pointers so that execution starts at 
&HE001 and data is stored beginning at low end of RAM 
(512 bytes are reserved at the beginning of RAM for 
machine language subroutines). 

5) Execute a "RUN" command to start the program. 
All of the above will take about one minute. Step 3 above 

could be replaced by a machine language subroutine to 
speed things up a bit so that everything could be 
accomplished in less than 15 seconds. 
Here are some rules to observe: 

1) You cannot run Basic programs following this 
procedure if they are longer than 7600 bytes. 

2) Once the program has been relocated to upper 32K, you 



cannot change it. The machine will hang up if you attempt to 
change it. 

3) The high speed mode will not work (at least in my 
machine), so you will have to remove all "POKE 65495,0" 
statements. 

4) Change location of machine language subroutines to 
the beginning of RAM if you can, so they do not conflict 
with your Basic program. This is not necessary, but you will 
maximize space for data by relocating them. 

I have been running the above program to convert 
programs designed to handle large amounts of data (i.e., 
datafiles, word processors, etc.), and have not had any 
problems to date. If any of you encounter any problems, I 
would like to know about it. Please send your comments to 
the Rainbow and they will be forwarded to me. 

I hope this program allows many of you with 64K 
machines to use that upper 8K of "wasted" RAM. 

The listing: 

10 CLS0:PRINT@234, "64K SYSTEM"; 

20 Y=0 

30 D*= " 1 A508E8000A684B7FFDF A780B 

7FFDE8CFF0026F 1 B7FFDF 1 C AF39 " 

40 FOR X=1T0LEN<D*)STEP2: SOUND R 

ND(200) , 1 



50 

) 

60 

70 

80 



A*="&H"+MID*<D*,X,2> =A=VAL<A* 



POKE&H7E00+Y, A: Y=Y+1 : NEXTX 

POKE&HFF40, 0: EXEC&H7E00 

FOR X=lT03:P0KE&HC13F+X,ASC<t1 

ID*<"64K" , X, 1) ): NEXTX 

90 SOUND100, HCLS: PRINT @224, " 
CHANGING BASIC PROGRAM" 

100 IF PEEK<&HC000>=68 THEN S=&H 

2601 ELSE S=&H1E01 

110 K=(ScHE001-S)/256 

120 E=PEEK<25)*256+PEEK<26)-2:X= 

S 

130 A1=PEEK(X) :A2=PEEK(X+1): A=A1 

*256+A2 

140 POKEX,Al+K: IF A=E THEN POKEX 

, &H10: POKEX+1 , 1 : GOTO160 

150 X= A: GOTO 130 

160 CLSISOUND100, l:PRINT@224, " 
RELOCATING PROGRAM" 
FOR X=S-1 TO E + l 

poke x+<k*256> , peek (x) : nextx 
for x=0TO3:poke&hi000+x,0:ne 



170 
180 
190 
XTX 
200 
210 



IF S=&H1E01 THEN 220 
P0KE25, &HE0: P0KE26, 1 : P0KE27, 

&H10IPOKE28, URUN 

220 P0KE25, &HE0: P0KE26, 1 : P0KE27, 

&H08 : P0KE28 , 1 : RUN 



166 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



Color Computer 
Expansion Interface 



NOW SHIPPING! 




COMPARE THESE FEA TURES! 

• RS DISK COMPATIBLE — NO modification required 

• 64K Memory access circuit (for 32K Rev-E computer) — NO modification needed 

• Parallel PI A port — Drives printer or I/O — leaves RS-232 available for modem, etc. 

• Expansion port — selects up to 7 more peripheral cards 

• Aluminum chassis — saves space — computer slides under — TV on top 

— Room for Expander Card and up to 4 peripheral cards. 

• Additional I/O cards . . . available January 1983 

• CX-2010A Quad Parallel I/O Port (2 M6821 PIAs) $99.95 

• CX-2016A Speech Synthesizer (Votrax phoneme system) $129.95 

. . . more peripheral cards on the way! 

CX-2001A EXPANDER CARD (REQUIRES CX-Z401A) $139.95 

CX-2401 A EXTENSION RIBBON CABLE $29.95 

CX-3001 A ALUMINUM CHASSIS (IDEAL FOR STAND ALONE USE) $49.95 

CX-P1- INTRODUCTORY OFFER — PACKAGE PRICE $199.95 

PA RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX 

INCLUDE $3.50 FOR SHIPPING & HANDLING WITHIN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. ADO $1 .50 FOR C.O.D. CHARGES. 



4% 



General Automation 
9600 Roosevelt Blvd., Suite iOO-LL 
Philadelphia, PA 191 1 5 
(21 S) 934*3758 



Software Review... 

Being Down in the Trench 
Can Be Uplifting 

I well remember, but would like to forget, being in a video 
arcade one evening and climbing into a game machine that 
was sort of like a small cockpit. After three quarters' worth 
of play time, I still didn't know where I was, where the enemy 
was, where my shell burst were landing or, most 
importantly, how to find out any of the aforementioned. 
Well, my solution was to bail out and look for something I 
felt I could control. 

Too bad Fred B. Scerbo wasn't there with his Advanced 
Star-Trench Warfare', I might have been able to soothe my 
bruised ego and hit something besides the coin slot. Star- 
Trench is a fast-moving game of shoot the alien spacecraft 
before they shoot you. On giving it a go, to my utter 
amazement and delight, I was able to mow them down, even 
though they appeared just for the instant and then vanished, 
only to reappear somewhere else on the screen. Cruising in 
the cockpit, feeling cocky, looking for trouble, heading for 
adventure, here comes Dead-Eye Reed. 

Sure, there has to be acatch,andthereis, but I'm allforit. 
Fred has divided the screen into nine zones. If you spot an 
enemy craft in a given area of the screen and then are quick 
enough to aim your lasers toward that general area and fire, 
you'll probably blast the alien and add to your tally which is 
displayed on the panel above your windshield. On the other 
hand, if you hold the fire button down, like I do, you'll not 
only zap the aliens, but also quickly run out of energy and 
crash into the trench. I figure it's a small price to pay for 
getting to clobber the enemy for a change. After all, you 
have six lives to use up, anyhow, and it only costs one life to 
get a recharge and get airborne again. 

Another amazing aspect of Star- Trench is that it produces 
such speed and colorful graphics, with Extended Color 
Basic — not machine language. That means you can modify 



the game yourself if you want to add a few personal touches 
to Fred's well-crafted creation. Star-Trench can be speeded 
up even more by using the commands, 
PCLEAR6:POKE65495,0 before running. 

Being a frame-of-reference oriented person, unlike those 
people who seem to have a gyroscopic ability to always land 
on their feet and immediately point to the North Star, I like 
the fact that the cockpit is stationary and that the dash 
panels and instrumentation give me a feeling of where I am 
as well as keep the running tabulations of energy left, the 
number of aliens zapped and all. The colors and graphics 
add to the fun. 

Another feature is that Star-Trench has been designed for 
enhanced viewing when using 3-D glasses (not included). I 
located a pair of 3-D glasses and using them did provide a 
feeling of depth, but I think you'll enjoy the game just as 
much without them. 

A final note: Even if you aren't driven, like me, to find a 
game that makes you look good, Star- Trench may be just 
the thing for young children who can easily become 
bewildered by the complexities of some of the games on 
today's market. It's straightforward, easy to understand, 
and easy to play. All of us need something like that once in a 
while for reassurance, and children need it to build self- 
confidence. Advanced Star-Trench Warfare provides it. 
(1MB, Illustrated Memory Banks, P.O. Box 289, 
Williamstown, MA 01267-0289, $18.95 on tape.) 

Jim Reed 



How To Clear All Graphics Pages 

Y ou can clear all your graphics pages by entering the 
following command: POKE25,6:N EW. Ifyoudothis, 
you will not be able to use graphics pages, but you will 
have more program memory. 

Caution: Do not try this POKE with any program in 
memory. It will destroy whatever program is resident 
in the 80C. 



CZAP 



A disk inspect/modify 
routine. Learn how disks 
work, fix problems on 



your disks. 



$9.95 



NEATDIR 

Places the file names in 
your disk directories in 
alphabetical order. Keep 
your disks in order. $6.95 

TREK80C 



COPYTAPE CATALOG 



Copy, merge, and backup 
your tape based software 
Works even with popular 
pre-loader tapes. $9.95 

BACKUP 

Speed up disk backups, 
recover crashed disks. 
Bypass. I/O errors and 
fix your disks. $9.95 



An automatic disk file 
cataloging system. File 
the directories of your 



disks. 



$9.95 



OFFLOAD 

Create tape backups of 
your disks. A disk to 
tape, tape to disk copy 



system. 



$9.95 



The classic game. Real 
time, moving Klingons and 
action graphics. $14.95 



Send Check or Money Order To: 

A. M. Heom Software 

602 S. 48th St.-Dept. R 
Philadelphia, PA 19143 

Write For Free Catalog 



WWIII 



Save the world from 
nuclear destruction. Try 
to win the all out war 
with the USSR. $9.95 

Write for free catalog of these and other products. Dealer inquiries invited. ra.n«o* 



168 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



NOW THERE ARE TWO TOOLKITS FOR THE COLOR COMPUTER 

The software development tools that let you put even more power into the already 
powerful Color Computer. They're full of tools, aids, bells and whistles useful to the BASIC 
or MACHINE LANGUAGE programmer, in friendly, easy-to-use software packages. 

BOTH TOOLKITS CONTAIN . . . 

• Light characters on dark background w9th Current Line Highlighting; or normal characters 

• Full Screen Editor with Arrow Key controlled cursor; open up space/delete and close up space 

• Enabling selective Line Renumber/copy/move/merge; or normal Extended Basic line editor 

• Protect the current BASIC program from being wiped out with a CLOAD, NEW etc.; or from being LISTed 

• Restore a protected BASIC program/Append any number of BASIC programs together easily 

• Tone on keypress or normal silent keys (Tone modifiable by use of Sound an Command) 

• Global Search of command or text strings in BASIC programs with wildcard character and next "." 

• 9 Screen Print Delays with keyboard override (for slow, readable USTings and DISK DIRectories) 

• Variable Name List/String-Byte memory usage/Range of FREE MEM/Top of memory address display 
Fast Machine Code to BASIC DATA converter for storing machine code visibly in BASIC 
(C)SAVEM address/Backup Tool (Last file name, start, end and execute address) 
Recovery of Lost BASIC programs after NEW, BACKUP, DSKINI, etc. 
Break Key Disable/Enable (Pause keys still available) 
Modified TRON display (IN replaces (LN) 

THE FULL TOOLKIT ALSO CONTAINS . . . 

□ Merge BASIC with Machine Code routines so machine code is "invisible" and (C)SAVE/(C)LOADable 

□ 9 BASIC RUN delays with keyboard override; Single Step(s) mode with current line number display 

□ Memory Examine/Modify with HEX/ASCII/DEC/Double Decimal output and HEX/ASCII input 

□ Memory Block Move for relocating machine code programs, DATA blocks, etc.; or the Kit itself 

□ Ten User Defined Function Keys accessable with @/number (BASIC Macros/Block storage) 

□ Automatic linefeed for printers that don't/double space USTings; or normal PRINT 

□ Delete all spaces (not in PRINT strings, DATA or REMARK lines) 

□ ASCII/HEX memory Dumps to screen or printer 

□ Delete all REMarks (either REM or ' type) 

□ Parallel ECHO of screen output to printer 



THESE FEATURES ARE FOUND ON BOTH VERSIONS . . . 

— Transparent to the user, Install it and forget it until you need it 

— BASIC runs up to one-third faster through the Toolkit (5-10% typical) 

— HELP command lists all Kit commands and current Kit address 

— Same program works with tape or disk and in 16 or 32K 

— Entire system totally removable at any time 

— Compatible with other utility programs 

— Green/Orange text screen capability 

— Easily modifiable command syntax 

The Kits are relocatable programs that load any time without bothering your BASIC program or variables or top of 
memory address. All tools may be turned on or off at will, including the Kit itself. 

The tools are available with simple three or four letter commandsentered in the direct mode, with the entire instruction 
set viewable through the HELP command. 

The Colorkit is 5K bytes for $29.95 rainb ow The Microkit is 2.5K bytes for $27.95 

Available on disk with handy BASIC Kit loader for additional $5 w "^f TKW Manual available separately for $5 



THE GOOD LIFE 



$16.95 THE DISK COMMANDER 



The Classic Game of Life With: 
64x64 color symmetrical display 
3 Selectable birth and old age colors 
15 modifiable pre-programmed 

patterns 
Save/Load life screens to tape/disk 
Speeds from 8 gen/sec to 1 a second 
Joystick or arrow key Input 
Written In useunodlflable BASIC 
With machine code LIFE processor 
Help screen command list 
Tape/Disk compatible 
Selectable color sets 
Y&X axis wraparound @ 



$19.95 DEER HUNT 



$15.95 



Disk File Utility with: 

• One key vlew/copy/load(m) of files 

• Two key kill/rename of flies 

• Sort directory on name/extension 

• Pack directory so new files put at end 

• Directory keyword search of filename 

• Print DIRwtth machine code address 

• Recover killed files 



Arcade shoot-em-up skill game 
Aim only for the deer 
Avoid hitting people, cars, train 
Will not cause tension headache 
BASIC/machine code hybrid 
Tape/Disk compatible 



ARIZIN 



P. O. Box 8825 
Scottsdale, AZ 85252 



Graphics 



Create Three-Dimensional 
Graphics with Sar 27 



by Ed Krikorian 




L-^-p^-A:^''-. 




I6K 
ECBl 



"Earth to Sar 27 . ..It looks as though you've either landed 
on the moon, are caught in a space warp, or possibly are 
being sucked into a black hole. We advise a dump-to-printer 
and return home. Over..." 

Sar 27 creates those bizarre three-dimensional landscapes 
you see so often in ads for advanced computers. This 
program allows the user to input the initial parameters, and 
then draws the resulting image in the PMODE 4,1 HI- 
RESOLUTION mode. The user can create mountains, 
valleys and even objects looking like those crazy black holes. 

I would highly recommend that the user make screen 
dumps to his printer as these objects look excellent when 
hard-copied. The only actual graphics commands used are 
PSET, LINE, SCREEN, PMODE, AND PCLS. The only 
upper level function used is the SINE, in which the user can 
vary the amplitude, period and frequency of the initial 



; 



p 



J- w 

THE COMPOSER 



SPEECH SYSTEMS, A MANUFACTURER OF SPEEC 
SYNTHESIZERS FOR THE SS-50 BUS, INTRODU 
COLOR COMPUTER. THE COMPOSER IS A A 
ALLOWS ONE TO EASILY DEVELOP MUSIC. 
WAVESHAPE TABLE. BOTH A BASIC AND A MA 
INCLUDED, NO ADDITIONAL HARDWARE IS 
ALLOWS THE ORGINAL MUSICAL SCORE TO 
COMPILED MUSIC MAT BE SAVED AND BEST OF 
WITHOUT ANY OTHER SOFTWARE. EXAMPLES 
CAN BE USED TO REPRODUCE SOUND EFFECTS 
HAVE TO HEAR THE DIFFERENCE TO REALLY 
SOME OF THESE FEATURES: 



MUSIC, AND SOUND EFFECT 
CES THE COHPOSER FOR THE 
VOICE MUSIC COMPILER WHICH 
ACH VOICE USES ITS OWN 
CHINE LANGUAGE PROGRAM ARE 
NECESSARY. THE COMPOSER 
E SAVED. IN ADDITION, THE 
ALL IT MAY BE PLAYED 

OF HOW THE COLOR COMPUTER 
ARE ALSO INCLUDED. YOU 

COMPARE, BUT JUST LOOK AT 



THE RADIO SHACK 

COMPOSER MUSIC 

PRICE $2U.95 $29-95 

VOICES , ** ? 

OCTAVE RANGE 7 1 

WAVESHAPES 4 4 

MANUA1 r 25 full pages 16 mlni-pagea 

MUSIC INCLUDED , YES NO 

TEMPO (SPEED) ?0 + H 

DOTTED NOTE TES YES 

DOUBLE DOTTED YES NO 

TRIPLETT YES NO 

QUARTER NOTE TRIPLETT.. YES NO 

EICTH NOTE TRIPLETT YES NO 

THIRTY SECOND NOTE YES NO 

SOUND EFFECTS YES NO 

Requires 1 6K Extended BASIC 

CASSETTE VERSION I24.95 

DISK VERSION .$29-9 5 

CALL OR WRITE TO ORDER. .rf*™^ 

WE ACCEPT CASH, CHECK, COD, VISA, AND MASTERCARD. //F*\£\ 

ILLINOIS RESIDENTS PLEASE INCLUDE 5* SALES TAX. a/Lariv 

INCLUDE $1.50 FOR SHIPPING AND HANDLING. ^Tuj uiul 

DEALER INQUIRES INVITED. 

\L* *>rL ^\** ******* 38 W 255 DEERPA TH HO AD 

^ypeech _>^J tern* (m> $79 . ee$0 BA TA VIAi , L 60S10 



/m^wf^ 



curve. The program not only demonstrates some of the 
things you can do with the SINE, but also demonstrates the 
trick behind some of those fancy three-dimensional graphs. 

PROGRAM VARIABLE DICTIONARY 

PI: Value of the complex number PI. 

K: One of the variables that controls the period and 
frequency. ABS(K)/(2*PI)=FREQ) (2*PI)/ABS(K)= 
PERIOD. 

A: AMPLITUDE of SINE wave. 

AO: Amount of change in curves' AMPLITUDE. NOTE: 
This value is added to old AMPLUTUDE after every curve 
has been drawn. 

OO: This is the amount of change in height of the following 
curves. 

CU: Number of curves where AMPLITUDE is 
incremented by (AO). Also (OF) is decremented by (OO). 

CX: Number of curves where AMPLITUDE gets 00 
subtracted from it. Also (OF) is incremented by (AO). 

G: Shift in curve starting position gives different vantage 
points. 

E: STEP amount for main loop. The lower the value, the 
more connecting lines will emerge. 

OF: Initial height of first curve. 

SI,S2: Start and stop values for main loop. Try using -30 to 
58. 

XO: Horizontal shift factor 

The first part of the program draws curves with lift being 
decremented and AMPLITUDE being incremented by 
(AO). The horizontal shift is incremented by (G). 

The second part of the program draws curves with LIFT 
being incremented by (AO) and AMPLITUDE being 
decremented by (00). Horizontal shift is the same. Note: 
The user can vary (K) by changing line 100's value for (K). 

Sample input: AMPLITUDE=2.5, LIFT=3, UP- 
CURVES=5, DOWN-CURVES=4, SHIFT=5, STEP=4, 
INITIAL HEIGHT=150, DOMAIN of X=30,58^ 

The listing: ■ 



1 REM SAR27 BY ED KRIKORIAN 1 

2 REM 604 SWEETWATER BLVD.,N. 

3 REM LONGWOOD, FLORIDA 

4 REM 32750 

5 REM *USES HIGH SPEED POKE. 

6 REM DELETE LINES 120 AND 470 

7 REM IF YOUR SYSTEM LACKS 



170 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 




ADVENTURES 



16K CIRCUS ADVENTURE $9.95 

A child's adventure game with many songs, graphics, 
and surprises. Meet all of your circus favorites while 
searching for the popcorn man. Great family fun for ail 
ages. 

16K SCHOOLMAZE ADVENTURE S 11 - 95 

While in search of a lost computer tape, you travel in a 
school and draw pictures, compose songs, play basket- 
ball, and use the keyboard to travel in the hallways. 



fef±VJ*1 



NEW!! "FROG-MAN" by Carsten Lawrenz 

16K Ext. Basic $11-95 

Lively, action packed, joystick controlled game. 7 
levels of difficulty and timer. Best score displayed. Get 
your frogs safely home through several interesting 
obstacles. 



COCO-JOT by Steve Greenberg 

16K $11.95 

A new version of the famous Jotto word game. A guess- 
ing game using your powers of reasoning and deduction. 
1 or 2 player game. Different levels of play. Ages 8 to 
adult. User modifiable. 









^ 




• 



<** 



Computer Island Presents 

THE BEST IN 
SOFTWARE FOR KIDS! 



RAINB OW 

CEKTVCATVON 



*-*•* NEW -*■*-* 

SOFTWARE FOR SPECTRUM'S LIGHTPEN 

FUN-PAK: THIS 3 PR06RAN GA«E SET 
HILL ENTERTAIN YOU WITH A i GREAT* 
NEW DIMENSION FOR YOUR COMPUTER. 
FUN-PAK TAPE 16-K Ext. $14.95 
LIGHTPEN AND TAPE $34.95 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE GAMES 16K Ext. or 16K $9.95 

FRENCH BASEBALL - Score base hits or home runs 

for correct answers. You're out if wrong. Correct 

answers supplied. Fun way to learn and practice 

vocabulary. 2 levels. 

SPANISH BASEBALL - Same game using Spanish 

vocabulary words. 

ITALIAN BASEBALL - Same game using Italian 

vocabulary words. 

User Modifiable. 

PLEASE SPECIFY LANGUAGE AND VERSION 




HEBREW ALPHABET 16K Ext. Basic $9.95 

Learn to recognize the letters of the Hebrew alphabet. 
Each letter graphically displayed. Help command, 
vocabulary words included. 



DOLLARS AND SENSE / V7f^ v 16K Ext. $11.95 
Learn to make purchases. Graphic displays of items 
kids love. Player buys using dollars and coins to prac 
tice using money correctly. Solutions given. 

ADDITION AND SUBTRACTION 16K $11.95 

Menu driven, 2 level program provides practice in 
adding or subtracting 2 digit numbers. Vertical format 
for proper entry of digits in the answers. Report card 
scoring. 

READING GAMES 2 Pack 4K $9.95 

Silly Stories and Wizard: These games provide practice 
in reading simple stories and phrases. User input 
make these games personal and fun and keep your 
child interested in reading the results. 



READING 2-PAK 4K $9.95 

POETRY and SILLY SENTENCES: Any child can create 
his own original reading material about familiar 
people and things through user input. 




A BYTE OF COLOR BASIC 
by Steve Blyn 



A work-text containing - instruction, examples, 
illustrations, programs, and many practice exercises. 3 
Units - Basic, Graphics, and Sound. 24 chapters to 
teach you what you need to know to begin reading, 
understanding, and writing your own programs. 
Answer Key included with each book. Great book for 
beginners. $4.95 NEW LOW PRICE plus 50t postage 

SCHOOL DISCOUNTS 




NAME THAT SONG GAMES 
16K Extended $9.95 each 

1. 72 children's popular songs. 2 levels of difficulty. 
Timer. Many hours of fun. 

2. 72 all time pop, country, and movie melodies from 
the last three decades. 

3. 60 Broadway Show tunes to test you on past 
musicals. Fun for all trivia buffs. 



■■*. 



\N. 






e */ 



•*. 







PRESCHOOL 



PRESCHOOL PACK 1 by Joseph Kolar 

16K Ext. $11.95 

Clown and FistvNum:Two programs to help your child 
recognize and count the words and numbers 1 • 10. 
Hi-res graphics and lively songs help to attract and 
keep attention. 

PRESCHOOL PACK 2 by Joseph Kolar 

16KExt. $11.95 

Count Kids and Add Penny: Two programs to help your 
child count and add up to 10. Beautiful hi-res 
graphics. 

PRESCHOOL PACK 3 by Joseph Kolar 

16K Ext. $11.95 

Alpha-Byte: Programs designed to teach recognition 
and identification of the alphabet. Attractive hi-res 
graphics. 

MUSIC MARVEL 16K Ext. Basic $9.95 

Play 2 familiar children's songs. Large graphic 
displays. No reading or musical ability needed. Great 
for pre-schoolers. 16K version also available. Please 
specify. 



8 REM HIGH SPEED CAPABILITY. 

10 DIM N<200,2> 

20 PI=3. 1415926:K=.08 

30 A=0IOF=125 

40 INPUT"AMPLITUDE.LIFT";AO-00 
50 INPUT M K VALUE" ;K 

60 INPUT" NUMBER OF UP-CURVES" ; CU 

70 INPUT "NUMBER OF DOWN-CURVES"; 

CX 

80 INPUT"SHIFT,STEP";G,E 

90 INPUT" INITIAL HEIGHT (0-191 )" ; 

OF 

100 INPUT"DOMAIN OF X";S1,S2 

105 INPUT "CROSS LINES (l=NO)";C 

L 



110 PMODE 4, UPCLS: SCREEN 



1,0 



120 POKE 65495,0 

130 FOR PL=1 TO CU 

140 NC=0 

150 FOR X=S1 TO S2 STEP E 

160 Y=A*SIN<K*X> 

170 IF PO=0 THEN 190 

180 LINE(X+60+XO,OF-Y)-(XX,YY),P 

SET 

185 IF CL=1 THEN 250 

190 IF FL=0 THEN 210 

200 LINE(X+60+XO,OF-Y)-(N(NC,0) , 

N(NC, 1)) ,PSET 



r 



BATTLE of GETTYSBURG 
ft Strategy fiame 

ior mature Players 




STOP REBEL INVADERS! 
OR DIE! 



210 N(NC,0)=X+60+XO:N(NC, l)=OF-Y 

220 IF FL=1 THEN 240 

230 PSET(X+60+XO,OF-Y, 1) 

240 NC=NC+l:PO=l 

250 XX=X+60+XO:YY=OF-Y 

260 NEXT X 

270 a=a+ao:of=of-oo:xo=xo+g:fl=i 

280 PO=0 
290 NEXT PL 
300 FOR PL=1 TO CX 
310 NC=0 

320 FOR X=S1 TO S2 STEP E 
330 Y=A*SIN<K*X> 
340 IF PO=0 THEN 360 
350 LINE(X+60+XO,OF-Y)-(XX,YY) ,P 
SET 

355 IF CL=1 THEN 420 
360 IF FL=0 THEN 380 
370 LINE(X+60+XO,OF-Y)-(N(NC,0) , 
N(NC, 1) ) ,PSET 

380 N(NC,0)=X+60+XO:N(NC, l)=OF-Y 
390 IF FL=1 THEN 410 
400 PSET(X+60+XO,OF~Y, 1) 
410 NC=NC+l:PO=l 
420 XX=X+60+XO:YY=OF-Y 
430 NEXT X 

440 a=a-oo:of=of+ao:xo=xo+g:fl=i 

450 PO=0 

460 NEXT PL 

470 POKE 65494, 126 

480 GOTO 480 



ooooogoooooooooooooooooooooooo 9 Listing 2'. 



10 

20 
30 
40 
50 
60 
70 
80 
90 

100 




RA=90 
INPUT 
INPUT 
INPUT 
INPUT 
INPUT 
PMODE 

SCREEN 1,0 
FOR RA=10 TO 
FOR N=TT TO 



PI=3. 1415926 
"NUMBER OF SIDES" 5 S 

"offset"; pl 
"radius<90" ;rx 
"step";dd 

"ROTATE" ;TT 
4, UPCLS 



I P.O. Box 3504 i 

I Austin, Texas: 78764 f 
S I 

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo<x>o 



RX STEP DD 
S*2+TT STEP 2 
X1=128+RA*<C0S< (N+OF)*PI/S> ) 
Y1=96-RA*<SIN< <N+OF)*PI/S) ) 
X2=128+RA*<C0S< ( (N+0F)+4)*PI 

Y2=96-RA*(SIN( < (N+OF) +4) *PI/ 

LINE(ABS(X1) ,ABS(Y1) )-(ABS(X 
2) ,ABS(Y2) ) ,PSET 
160 NEXT N 
170 OF=OF+PL 
180 NEXT RA 

190 CIRCLE (128, 96) ,RX, 1, 1 
200 GOTO 200 



172 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 






DUNKEY MUNKEY 

Dunkey Munkey, has kidnapped 
Ruby. If you make it through the 
first level, trying to rescue her 
there^s two others filled with 
thrills and excitement. With two 
action packed screens and three 
levels of play DUNKEY 
M U N KEY's great for arcade buffs 
TAPE. . . $21.95 DISK. . . $26.95 



*£? 



i±±±i 







.,,' 



. . .,t ..' 



ooooao n in 




PACDROIDS 

With its space theme, the Super 
Saucerlaysdestructomines and 
the Super Bomb that disinte- 
grates everything in your path, 
right up to the wall. The maze 
changes every 1 0,000 points as 
the difficulty escalates. 1-4 
players. 
Tape $19.95 

Katterpillar Attack 

Modeled after the popular ar- 
cade game, Centipede. This is a 
well written game. It has slightly 
largergraphicsand better sound 
than Colopede. It is also simpler 
to play than Colorpeed. 
Tape. .$24.95 Disk... $27.95 

PHANTOM SLAYER 

You must chase the phantoms 
and kill them with your assort- 
ment of weapons This is a graph- 
ics type maze/adventure game 
with full screen three dimension- 
al graphics. You are armed with 
a laser pistol, and proximity de- 
tector. 
Tape. $19.95 

KEYS OF THE WIZARD 

A fast action, machine language 
adventure game filled with tricks, 
traps, treasures and creatures 
all of which are randomized at 
the beginning of each adventure 
so that no adventure will ever be 
exactly the same. There are three 
different skill levels. 
Tape $19.95 

GHOST GOBBLER 

Ghost Gobbler is an excellent 
version of Pac-Man ™. You must 
gobble all the food dots while 
avoiding the ghosts. There are 
four energizer dots which will 
make the ghosts turn blue and 
become scared. This is the best 
copy of the arcade game. 
Tape $14.95 




COLORPEDE 

Colorpede has a variety of bugs 
ranging from a tinybettle to the 
gigantic colorpede. Colorpede 
has better graphics than Kater- 
pillar but the sound is not as 
good. Colorpede also has a 
more varied and complicated 
play routine. 
Tape $29.95 



DONKEY KING 

Using the four stages from the 
original acrade game, with your 
joystick in hand try to jump the 
barrels, collect the pins, 
manuever your way past the fall- 
ing jacks, and figure out the crazy 
conveyor belts. Written by Tom 
Mix, this ones sure to become a 
classic! 
Tape . . . $24.95 Disk . . . $27.95 



Now you can deduct up to 20% on the price of 
games: buy any 2 games deduct 10%, buy any 3 
gamesdeduct15%,buyany4gamesdeduct20% 
from games prices. 



— ■ TOP TEN 

1.) COLORPEDE by Intracolor 
2.) PUNET INVASION by Spectral Assoc. 
3.) DONKEY KING by Tom Mix 
4.) ASTRO BLAST by Mark Data 
S.) PACDROIDS by Programers Guild 
B.) SPACE RACE by Spectral Assoc. 
7.) DUNKEY MUNKEY by I ntellectonics 
8.) STARFIRE by I ntellectonics 
8.) HAYWIRE by Mark Data 
10.] GHOST GOBBLER by Spectral Assoc 



INVADERS REVENGE 

You, asthe last remaining space 
Invader, must battle the human 
shipsthat prowl the space lanes, 
and avoid the laser station that 
seeks to destroy you.A great 
game from Med. Systems. Re- 
verses the roll in space invaders 
you attack the laser bases. 
Tape $19.95 



HAYWIRE 



This is Mark Data's version of 
Beserk™. Super Colors and dy- 
namite sound effects in this fast 
paced arcade game for one or 
two players. The exciting com- 
bination of angry robots an the 
Indestructible Menace will pro- 
vide hours of action filled fun. 
Tape $24.95 



r ss 



i 


































1691 Eason • Pontiac, Michigan 48054 
Info: (313) 673-8700 • Orders: CALL TOLL FREE (800) 302-8881 

Master Charge and VISA OK. Please add $3.00 for shipping in the USA - $5.00 for Canada or Mexico - Proper postage outside of U S. - Canada - Mexico. 
Dealers: We are distributors for all items in this ad. Write for our catalog and price list 



AMPLITUDE, LIFT? -5, -2.5 

K VALUE? .04 

NUMBER OF UP-CURVES? 7 

NUMBER OF DOWN-CURVES? 15 

SHIFT, STEP? 2, 8 

INITIAL HEIGHT(0-191)? 100 

DOMAIN OF X?-40, 120 



J*55 


?§>S : 




— — 


J--I^-T"b' 1 


__-■ 


~"---^-&^Z=r 


J0?5S 


■"-• """■"-""'," 


^~'''7.~rt$&*~=-~ 












r ,:\, Jt H — =«■ 





WITHOUT CROSS LINES 

AMPLITUDE, LIFT? 2.5, 3 

K VALUE? .08 

NUMBER OF UP-CURVES? 15 

NUMBER OF DOWN-CURVES? 15 

SHIFT, STEP? 2,4 

INITIAL HEIGHT(0-191)? 150 

DOMAIN OF X? -20,140 




Software Review... 

The Game Show Is, 
Catagorically, A Winner 

You won't have to go to Hollywood to play the game 
shows on television if you have this clever program from 
Genesis Software. 

Called The Game Show, it's set up for two teams of 
competing players to answer questions from numerous 
categories, thus opening the game to almost any number of 



participants. And you're definitely doing it on TV, even if 
Neilson may never find you. 

In reviewing this 16K Extended Basic feature (it has 
adequate sound and some clever graphics), I played the 
game alone, yet it wasn't too difficult to imagine the fun it 
would be at a party, or just for a family gathering 'round the 
old CoCo on a cold winter's eve. 

Ihe Game Show is organized into four 1 5-round series of 
questions. At the beginning of a round, a category is 
displayed, and the team which presses its joystick button 
first must name an item in thecategory. If the item named by 
the first team is not the highest-priority answer, the other 
team is given the next opportunity to guess. And, if the 
playing team doesn't name all the items in the category 
before the third wrong guess, the other team is given one 
chance to name any of the remaining items. If the other team 
does name one of the remaining items, it receives all the 
points for that round. Otherwise, the first team receives all 
the points. 

Not only are you competing against the other team, but 
also against time. 

The desire to perform well in front of a friendly group, 
and the demands of a thirty-second time limit add the drama 
and excitement to make this what should be a very popular 
game offering from Genesis. 

(Genesis Software, P.O. Box 936, Manchester, MO 
63011, $19.95) 

—Courtney Noe 



RAINBOWfest To Be In 
Chicago April 22-24 

The very first national show and exhibition for CoCo will 
be held in Chicago April 22-24, sponsored by the Rainbow. 

RAINBOWfest will be at the Hyatt-Regency Woodfield, 
west of the downtown area. The RAINBOWfest site is 
adjacent to Woodfield Mall — the world's largest shopping 
center. 

According to preliminary plans, a large number of 
software and hardware firms will be on hand to exhibit their 
products. The meeting will also feature a great deal of fun 
and conversation about CoCo. 

We urge you to make plans to attend. A special hotel rate 
can be secured by mentioning the Rainbow. 

Admission will be $7.50 for all three days through an 
advance sale, or $5 per day for a single* day. Tickets at the 
door will be $1 1 for the entire session or $7.50 for a single 
day. 

Other events are planned and will be announced shortly. 



**************** 



Re-SLCOcK Enter-pr- i -s. e- -s. 

UE'RE PROUD 
****************************************************************************** 
AFTER Xms OFFER: THRU 31 J**J 83: 28"/. OFF OWILIST (*15.95 tape *19. 95 disk) 
WCHOR MODEMS *78 MONITORS $99. & UP 
EPSON MX-88-FT *524. 95 MX-199 *694. 95 
PROWRITER par. *465. 99 sen . ♦575.88 
*********** OttlLIST 4.8 ********************** P.U.P. 
Its a PHONE BOOK, ADDRESS BOOK, Mail * 
Label Generator and MORE! * 

The mini-data base -for home/business * 
SELECTIVE PRINTING; BATCH PRINTING * 
SEARCH; AUTO SAVE; TICKLER FILE; * 
f-ttlL LABELS; SORT; and MORE! * 

******************************************************************************* 
OWILIST *19. 95 T / *24. 95 D P.U.P. *9.95 : Send SASE -for FREE CATALOG 

SPECIFY 16 or 32K: TAPE OR DISK 

CODs accepted (shipping added) - NO CODs on ^RDWARE: N.Y.'ers add 6V. tax 

PEACOCK ENT. PHEAS&TT RUN BOX 494 RDH3 OV^STOTA , NY. 13832 315-697-7147 



5 Utilities -for your Color Computer 
VIDPRINT (print vidtex screens). 
DUAL (print to screen and printer), 
MERGE (merges basic programs). 
CSAVEM (duplicates ML programs). 
ttlORTIZE (loans & print schedules) 



174 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



Educational graphics... 



% 



A Graphic Look At 
Basic Trigonometry 

By Carlos Rumbaut 




We at the Rainbow are seeing an increasing flow of 
educational programming of late, and view this trend with 
justifiable optimism. 

Examples, such as the recent submission listed here, are 
helping strengthen the color computer as a respected 
educational tool. 

The program, Trigshow, uses high-resolution graphics 
and animation to provide dynamic illustrations of some 
basic concepts in geometry and trigonometry. Although 
best used as an auxiliary introduction to these concepts in a 
study of geometry, it can also be helpful to those with a 
limited working knowledge of them. 

Instructions throughout the program make it self- 
explanatory to the user. A list of topics is shown on the 
CRT; selecting one brings up the section's "title page," 
where the particular concept is defined. Following this 
comes an explanation of the graphics display, followed by 
the display itself. The section ends with a multiple-choice 
quiz. Each step or "page" is summoned by the space bar, so 
the user goes at his/her own pace. 

Trigshow is around 8K long. Extended Basic and at least 
16K RAM is required. 



Listing 1: 
1 *** 
3 *** 



S#& 



'EPS 


End 


T5D9 


3999 


0F8B 


2999 


0951 


1999 



TRIGSHOW ** 

BY CARLOS RUMBAUT ** 
4 '** JULY, 1982 ** 

10 DIM N*<6):N*<0)="E2F2G2H2" 

11 N*<1)="BR2U2D4" 

12 N*(2)= ,, BD3L3U3R3U3L3 M 

13 N* < 3 ) - " D3L3BU6R3D3L2 " 

14 N*<4)="D6U3L3U3" 

15 N* ( 5 ) - " R3L3D2R3D3L3 " 

16 N*<6)="D6R3U3L3" 
1 8 AN*= " U8R4D4L4R4D4BR4BU3R3BU3L 
3R3BU2BR3" : S*="D8R4U3L4" : F*="BD8 
R4U4L4U4R4BR4R4D8BR3R1BR3R4U4L2R 
2U4L4" 

20 PI=3. 1416:PI$="BU2R3D4U4R4D4U 
4R3 " : P2*= " R2D3L2D3R2BU3BR3 " +P I % 

21 PM0DE4, l:CLS 

25 PRINTSTRING* (10,168)" TRIG SH 
OW "STRING*<11,164>5 
30 PRINTSTRING* (32,227) 



35 print:print:print h this p 

rogram explains and" 

40 print" illustrates some funda 

MENTAL" 

45 PR I NT "CONCEPTS IN TRIGONOMETR 

Y, THEN" 

50 PRINT"GIVES A SHORT QUIZ AFTE 

R EACH SECTION." 

55 PR I NT: PR I NT" TO 'TURN THE PAG 

E', PRESS THE SPACE BAR. PRESS 

ING < SHIFT @> FREEZES CURRENT D 

I SPLAY UNTIL ANOTHER KEY IS PR 

ESSED-" 

60 IF INKEY$=""THEN60 

65 CLS: PRINT© 10,"- FOREWORD -" 

70 PRINT:PRINT:PRINT" TRIGONOME 

TRY WAS FIRST THOUGHTUP TO MEASU 

RE RATIOS WITHIN TR I -ANGLES. " 

75 PRINT" A VERY HANDY APPLICA 

TION IT HAS COME TO HAVE IS TO 

RELATE CIRCULAR MEASUREMENTS T 

O LINEAR ONES." 

80 PRINT: PRINT" THIS MAKES CIRC 

LES AND CURVES MUCH MORE MANAGEA 

BLE." 

90 IF INKEY$=""THEN90 

200 CLS : PR I NT : PR I NT : PR I NT " SELECT 

IONS:" 

205 PRINTSTRING$<11,204> 

210 PRINT: PRINTTAB( 10) "1. PI" 

220 PRINTTAB(10)"2. RADIANS" 

230 PRINTTAB(10)"3. SINE" 

240 PRINTTAB(10)"4. COSINE" 

255 PRINT: PRINT"TO RETURN TO THI 

S LIST, TYPE <L>"5 

260 PRINTSTRING$(32,195)+STRING* 

(32,236)5 

270 INPUT "WHICH WOULD YOU LIKE" 

;i 

280 ON I GOTO 1000,2000,3000,400 
0IEND 

999 ' 

1000 cls:t*="pi m :gosub 6000 

1005 PR I NT: PR I NT "WHERE DOES PI C 
OME FROM?" 

1010 PRINT" PI IS THE NUMBER OF 
DIAMETERS THAT FIT ALONG THE CI 



F> E*=* COCK EMT E R F> R I SES 

WE'RE PROUD 
*************************** INTRODUCING OVULIST 5.8 *************************** 
CMAILIST 5.8 is a DISK based version o-f our -famous CMAILIST program. CMAILIST 
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16K, 32K, 1 or 2 drives. Over 588 RECORDS maybe stored per FILE. ADDED FEATURES 
now include DOUBLE or SINGLE line street address, and the ability to have a 
TITLE (President; Sales Rep. etc.) -follow the last name. PLUS a host o-f 
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our comprehensive manual, 1 year warranty, -free upgrades, written in BASIC. 

CMAILIST 5.8 is available now -for immediate delivery. Join the ranks o-f hundreds 
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CODs accepted (shipping added): Send SASE -for FREE CATALOG 
PEACOCK ENTT. PHEAS^TT RUN BOX 494 RD#3 C^WSTOTA , NY. 13832 315-697-7147 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 175 



RCUMFERENCE OF A CIRCLE." 

1020 PRINT: PRINT U THE NEXT PAGE S 

HOWS A CIRCLE OF DIAMETER 1 ROLL 

ED OUT THE LENGTH OF ITS CIRCUMF 

ERENCE, 3.14159 (APPROXIMATELY) 
it 

1055 GOSUB 6160 

1095 PCLS: SCREEN 1,1 

1100 LINE (32, 150) -(220, 150), PSET 

1105 LINE(34,90)-(34, 150), PSET 

1110 CIRCLE(34, 158), 3 

1120 DRAW "BM216,157"+PI* 

1130 FOR X=0 TO 2*PI STEP PI/12 

1140 C=34+30*X:S=.25+X/(2*PI) 

1145 IF S>1 THEN S=S-1 

1160 CIRCLE (C, 120), 30, 1, 1,S, .25 

1165 SOUND C, 1 

1170 IF X=0 THEN 1200 

1190 CIRCLE(C, 120),30,0,1,S,.25 

1200 NEXT X 

1210 GOSUB 6160 

1220 cls:t*="quiz": gosub 6000 

1225 IF LEFT*(R*, 1)=" Y M THEN 1095 

1230 PRINT: PRINT" HOW MANY RAD 

II WILL FIT ALONG THE CIRCUMFERE 

NCE OF A CIRCLE?" 

1240 A*="6":B*="2*PI":C*="PI/2": 

R*="B":GOSUB6060 

1280 print:print m what is the dia 

METER OF A CIRCLE WITH A CIRCUMFE 



1982 Interactive "What If" 



TAX Analysis 

PROGRAM - 1040 - SCHED. A 
for the TRS-80 Color Computer™ (16K) 



OPTIMIZE TAX RETURNS 

Makes It Easy & Simple To: 



• MODIFY Tax Data & Receive IMMEDIATE 

RECALCULATION of Return. 

RAINBOW 

• Menu Driven/Tree Structured S/W "^ 



• SAVE /Restore Tax Data 



ONLY $19.99 



Add $1.00 postage 

Plus $1.50 if C.O.D. 

In VA, add 4% sales tax 



Q 



SYSTEMS 



7602 SEOANE COURT 
FALLS CHURCH, VA 22042 



RENCE OF 31.4159?" 

1290 A*=" 10" : B*="2*PI " : C*="20" : R 

*="A":GOSUB6060 

1320 print:print m which formul 

A FOR THE CIRCUM-FERENCE OF A CI 
RCLE IS CORRECT?" 

1321 PRINT" (R=R AD I US)" 

1330 A*="C=PI*R^2":B$="C=PI*R/2" 

: c*= " c=p I *R*2 " : R*= " c " : GOSUB6060 

1410 IF INKEY*="" THEN 1410 ELSE 
200 

1999 * 

2000 CLS:T*=" RADIANS": GOSUB 6000 
2010 PRINT: PRINT" AN ANGLE IS 

THE SIZE OF ONE RADIAN WHEN IT 
MARKS OFF AN ARC THE SIZE OF ONE 

RADIUS. " 
2020 PR I NT "REMEMBER YOU CAN FIT 
2*PI RADII ALONG THE CIRCUMFEREN 
CE. THERE-FORE, 2*PI RADIANS WI 
LL FIT IN- SIDE OF A CIRCLE." 
2025 GOSUB 6160 
2030 CLS: PRINT: PRINT" THE NEXT 

PAGE SHOWS A CIRCLE MARKED FIRS 
T IN WHOLE RADIANS, THEN IN FRA 
CTIONS OF PI RADIANS." 
2035 PR I NT "THESE LATTER CORRESPO 
ND TO THE STANDARD ANGLES OF 45 
, 60, 90, ETC., DEGREES." 
2040 GOSUB 6160 
2045 PCLS: SCREEN 1,1 
2050 CIRCLE (128, 96) ,45 
2053 FOR X=4 TO 104 STEP 4 
2055 FOR X=0 TO 6 

2060 LINE(128,96)-(128+C0S(X)*45 
, 96-SIN ( X ) *45> , PSET 

2061 NEXT X 

2062 CIRCLE (180, 96) ,3:PLAY"C" 

2063 DRAW " BM 1 55 , 54 " +N* ( 1 ) : PLAY " D 
ii 

2064 DRAW"BM107, 51 "+N* (2) : PLAY"E 
ii 

2065 DRAW"BM78,89"+N*(3) :PLAY"F" 

2066 DRAW " BM95 , 1 34 " +N* ( 4 ) : PL AY " G 

ii 

2067 DRAW " BM 1 42 , 1 44 " +N* ( 5 ) : PLAY " 
A" 

2068 DRAW"BM176,110"+N*(6) :PLAY" 
B" 

2075 FOR T=l TO 1500:NEXTT 
2080 PCLS: CIRCLE (128, 96) ,45 
2085 DRAW"BM128, 96; R45" : CIRCLE ( 1 
80,96) ,2 

2090 DRAW " BM 1 28 , 96 5 E32 ; BU4 " +P I *+ 
"BR4NG3BR6"+N*(4) 

2091 SOUND 91,4 

2095 LINE (128, 96) -(151, 57), PSET: 
DRAW " BM 1 5 1 , 52 " +P I *+ " BR4NG3BR6BD2 
"+N*(3) 

2096 SOUND 96,4 



176 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



PRODUCTS FOR THE 



COMPUTERWARE® 

COLOR COMPUTER 



Radio Shack or TDP-100 



FUN & GAMES 



FUN & GAMES 



FUN & GAMES 







PAC ATTACK 

Bring arcade fun to your 
home! Three little rare earth 
muggers chase your man 
relentlessly around a 
maddening maze as you 
furiously try to eat up 
points. Three levels of 
difficulty and great graphics 
with sound! 
cassette. . .$24.95 
disk. . .$29.95 




MAZERACE & 
CAPTURE THE FLAG 

Two great games in one 
package! Mazerace is a 
board type game of chance 
& strategy. The hexagon 
matrix is filled with paths & 
obstacles. You must reach 
the other side before your 
opponent. Capture the Flag 
is similiar but runs in real 
time and has a different 
field. You can play with a 
friend or with the computer, 
cassette. . .$19.95 
disk. . .$24.95 



EL DIABLERO 

You awake, dazed and 
confused, in the middle of 
the desert. You had been 
learning techniques of 
sorcery from an old man 
who lives in these parts. He 
told you of his enemy, an 
evil sorcerer, a "diablero." 
Now your teacher is 
missing and you are alone! 
Pure adventure!! 
cassette. . .$19.95 
disk. . .$24.95 




STORM! 

A tempest of a game, Storm 
is an exciting & colorful 
experience with 15 different 
battlefields & 9 levels of 
challenge. Shoot enough 
Rainbow Raiders and you 
earn your way to the next 
level. Watch out for the 
milibars! 

cassette. . .$24.95 
disk. . .$29.95 



DOODLE BUG 

In high resolution graphics 
your lady bugs hussle 
through an intricate maze 
of barriers & turnstyles, 
trying to earn points by 
eating dots, letters, & 
hearts. Enemy bugs buzz 
after you! Exquisite sound 
and graphics! 
cassette. . .$24.95 
disk. . .$29.95 



RAIL RUNNER 




RAIL RUNNER 

Watch Out!! Your railroad 
engineer must scurry over 
the track of the busiest train 
switchyard ever, dodging 
speeding trains & handcars, 
to rescue the poor little 
hobos on the wrong side of 
the tracks! And the clock 
keeps on ticking! 
cassette. . .$21.95 
disk. . .$26.95 



STARSHIP 
CHAMELEON 

Your intergalaxian vessel 
must defend your planet 
against evil Gabalatok 
attack. You have the unique 
ability to change color at 
the push of a button to 
destroy oncoming bombs 
and anti-matter. Watch out 
for the semi-intelligent 
aerial mines that home in 
on you! Nine levels of play, 
cassette. . .$24.95 
disk. . .$29.95 



COLOR NMVD6RS 



^^ T*T ^^ T*T ^^ T*T ^^ T*T 

^^ t*t ^^ t*t ^^ t*t ^^ t*t 
^^ ^9 ^^ ^9 ^^ ^9 ^^ ^9 
^^ t*t ^^ t*t ^^ t*t ^^ t*t 



COLOR INVADERS 

You are at the controls of 
the Space Tank, firing at 
steller ships and invading 
critters. Ships burst in air 
with explosive noise. Alien 
critters march across the 
screen dropping bombs & 
screaming as life is zapped 
from their fried bodies, 
cassette. . .$19.95 
disk. . .$24.95 



TO ORDER: 

Add shipping of 
$2 surface or $5 
air/Canada. Visa 
& MasterCard 
accepted. 



Dealer Inquires Invited 

T&MPUTERWARE ( 



Computerware is a trademark of Computerware. 




call or write 

Box 668 

Encinitas, Ca. 92024 

(714) 436-3512 



2 1 00 DRAW " BM 1 28 , 96 5 U45BU7BL7 " +P I 
*+"BR4NG3BR6BD2"+N* (2) 

2101 SOUND 101,4 

2105 DRAW"BM128,965L45BL13"+PI* 

2106 SOUND 106,4 

2110 DRAW ,, BM128,96;D45;BD6BL8 ,, +N 
*<3>+"R2BR2"+PI*+"BR4NG3BR6BD2"+ 
N*<2> 

2111 SOUND 111,4 

2115 CIRCLE(180,96) ,2,0 

2120 DRAW ,, BM178,96 ,, +P2* 

2121 SOUND 121,4 
2130 GOSUB 6160 

2160 cls:t*= ,, quiz ,, :gosub6000 

2165 IF LEFT*<R*,1)="Y"THEN2045 

2170 PR I NT: PR I NT" HOW MANY DEG 

REES ARE THERE INPI RADIANS?" 

2 1 80 A*= " 1 80 " : B*= " 60*P I " : C** " 90 " 

:R$=»A": GOSUB 6060 

2220 PR I NT: PR I NT "HOW MANY RADIAN 

S ARE THERE IN A 90-DEGREE ANGLE 

?" 

2230 A*=" 1.5": B*="90-PI" : C*="PI / 

2 " : R*= " C " : GOSUB 6060 

2235 PR I NT: PR I NT "HOW MANY DEGREE 

S ARE THERE IN A RADIAN?" 

2240 a*=" 180/pi " : b*="2*pi " : c*="p 
i/180":r^="A":gosub 6060 

2250 IF INKEY*="" THEN 2250 ELSE 
200 

2999 ' 

3000 CLS:T*="SINE": GOSUB 6000 



3010 PRINT@53,CHR*<140> :PRINT@83 

,CHR*<140)+STRING*<2, 128): PRINT© 

1 13, CHR* ( 140) +STRING* (4, 128) 

3020 PRINT© 132, "HYPOTENUSE "+CHR 

*<140>+STRING*<6, 128) 

3030 PRINT@173,CHR*<140)+STRING* 

(8, 128)+" OPPOSITE" 

3040 PRINT@203,CHR*<140)+STRING* 

(10, 128) 

3050 PRINT@229," (A) "+CHR*<140)+ 

STRING*<12,128> 

3060 PRINTQ267, "ADJACENT" 

3070 PR I NT: PR I NT" THE TRIGONO 

METRIC FUNCTIONS, LIKE SINE, RELA 

TE AN ANGLE (A) TOTHE LENGTHS OF 

THE SIDES OF ITS RIGHT TRIANGLE, 
ii 

3080 GOSUB 6160 

3100 cls:print:print m the sine of 
an angle is equal tothe ratio o 
f the lengths of the opposite si 
de to the hypotenuse. sine = op 
posite / hypotenuse" 
3200 print: print" in a circle o 
f radius one, thehypotenuse is 1 
and so the sine of an angle equ 
als its opposite side." 
3210 print"the next page plots t 
he oppositeside along a line whi 
ch linearlyrepresents radians." 

3220 GOSUB 6160 
3250 PCLS: SCREEN 1 , 1 



TRS-80* COLOR COMPUTER* 

-1SK Extended Basic, Menu-Driven, Well-Documented, Easily-Modified. 
-For either cassette or diskette systems (Be sure to specify). 
-Place an order of at least $40 and get one extra of your choice free. 
-Orders shipped on cassette - Add $5 for shipment on diskette. 



/^\ 



-FURST- 

Date Element Dictionary driven File Update and 
Retrieval SysTem. Create and maintain files according 
to your specifications. Ideas for applications in- 
cluded $25 

-MAILING LABELS- '£££ 

Generate and maintain mailing label records. Selective- 
ly print desired quantities. Can keep several label files if 
desired. Designed for Printer VII, easily modified. $20 



-REPORT WRITER- "«? 

Used in conjunction with FURST to selectively format 
reports on your printer. Includes headings and total 
capabilities $15 



-EXERCISE PLANNER- 

Build and maintain complete exercise schedule for 
regular and/or weight programs. Display guides you 
through daily-calculated routines. Print complete 
schedule if desired $15 

-DISK DIRECTORY PRINT- yg°» 

For diskette users only. Get hard copy of disk directories on your printer for easy use and reference. Only $5 

Send check or money order to: 

LAND SYSTEMS 

P.O. Box 232 
Bellbrook, Ohio 45305 



•TRS-80 and COLOR COMPUTER 
are Trademarks of Tandy Corp. 





178 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



We Arc Changing 
(Our Name) 

To better reflect our status as an international orginazation, 

with world wide membership, the 

East Texas Color Computer Club 

is Changing its name to: 

International 
Color Computer Club 



We publish a "magazine" sized newsletter (bi-monthly) which 
seems to just keep growing, and it's loaded with programs, 
many are business programs. 

We offer discounts on commercial programs from some of 
the major suppliers, and discounts on subscriptions to CCN, 
chromasette and the Rainbow. 

We also have a library full of super programs and books. 

If you would like to become a part of the worlds largest color 
computer club, just send us a postcard with your name and 
address and we will send details on how you may become a 
member. 



International Color Computer Club 
Main Office 
2101 E. Main St. 
Henderson, Texas 75652 



In Canada 
96 Carleton Dr. 
Saskatoon, Sask. S7H - 3N6 



3300 LINE (10, 90) -(240, 90), PSET 

3310 LINE(82,90)-(95, 90), PRESET 

3320 LINE (10, 175) -(240, 175),PSET 

3330 LINE(82,175)-(95,175),PRESE 

T 

3340 DRAW"BM12, 179; Rl 5 BR3; U2D4" 

3350 CIRCLE (45, 179), 3: CIRCLE (97, 

179), 3 

3360 DRAW " BM75 , 1 77 ; D4 " 

3370 DRAW " BM 1 67 , 1 79 " +P I * : DRAW " BM 

235,177"+P2* 

3380 CIRCLE (45, 90) ,30 

3390 FOR X=0 TO PI*2 STEP PI/15 

3395 H=45+COS(X)*30:V=90-SIN(X)* 

30 

3400 LINE (H, 90) -(H,V), PSET 

3405 LINE(95+23*X,V)-(95+23*X,90 

),PSET 

3410 LINE(H,V)-(45,90) , PSET 

3415 SOUND 150+SIN(X)*60,1 

3420 IF X>0 THEN LINE (45, 90) - (H, 

V) , PRESET 

3425 IFX>PI THEN LINE ( 10, 90) - (82 

,90), PSET 

3428 LINE (H,V)-(H, 90), PRESET 

3430 NEXT X 

3440 GOSUB 6160 

3450 CLS:T*=" QUIZ": GOSUB 6000 

3455 I F LEFT* ( R* , 1 ) = " Y " THEN3250 



COLOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

Adventure games 
- THE ALCHEMIST'S LABORATORY - $14.95 

mix the ingredients that will 
turn lead into gold. 

- LOKAR'S MAGIC STAFF- $14.95 

can you unlock the deadly secrets of LOKAR'S magic staff? 

- MEGAMAZE - $14.95 
a wild, five dimensional space maze adventure. 

- SQUEEZE - $14.95 
arcade style game where aliens close in from both sides at 
once. 

- GRAPHIC SCREEN EOITOR - $16.95 
create pictures on the screen using joysticks or arrow keys- 
save on tape, erase, paint, and many other features. 

- COLOR SHOW DISPLAYS - $8.95 

five graphics programs that create endless changing pat- 
terns. 

all programs 16-K extended basic cassette only. 
Send for free catalogue. We accept checks, money orders, 
Visa and Mastercharge. (no C.O.D. 's) Please add $1 .00 for 
shipping. Send to: 

REAL SOFTWARE CO. 

P.O. BOX 401 • HOPEDALE, MA 01747 
(617) 393-6281 

CIS orders EMAIL to 71505,430 
Mass. residents add 5% sales tax Dealer inquiries welcomed 



3460 PRINT: PRINT" AFTER WHAT N 

UMBER OF RADIANS DOES THE VALUE 

OF SINE TURN NEG-ATIVE?" 

3470 A*="0" : B*="PI " : C$= ,, 2*PI M : R* 

="B": GOSUB 6060 

3480 PRINT: PRINT" AT WHAT ANGL 

E IS SINE AT ITS HIGHEST POINT?" 

3490 A*="0":B*="PI/2":C*="-PI/2" 

:R*="B": GOSUB 6060 

3500 PRINT: PRINT"WHAT IS THE SIN 

E OF 3*PI/2?" 

3510 a*="0" : B*=" l " : c*="-i " : r*="c 

" : GOSUB6060 

3520 IF INKEY*=""THEN 3520 ELSE 

200 

3999 ' 

4000 cls:t*=" cosine": gosub 6000 

4010 PRINT: PRINT"THE COSINE OF A 
N ANGLE IS EQUAL TO THE RATIO O 
F THE LENGTHS OF THE ADJACENT SI 
DE TO THAT OF THE HYPOTENUSE. TH 
AT IS: COS I NE= AD J AC 

ENT/HYPOTENUSE" 

4020 PRINT" TO SHOW HOW ANGULA 
R MEASURE CORRESPONDS TO THE CO 
SINE ON THENEXT PAGE, THE CIRCLE 
IS PLOTTEDWITH A VERTICAL X-AXI 
S." 

4030 PR I NT "THIS MAKES THE AD J ACE 
NT SIDE OF THE ANGLE VERTICAL." 
4040 GOSUB 6160 
4050 PCLS: SCREEN 1,1 
4060 LINE (95, 90) -(240, 90) , PSET: 
LINE(45,57)-(45, 123) , PSET 
4070 DRAW " BM8 1 , 1 20 ; R 1 ; BR3 ; U2D4 " 
4080 CIRCLE (85, 90), 3: CIRCLE (97,1 
49) ,3 

4090 DRAW " BM85 , 60 5 D4 " : DRAW " BM 1 67 
,149; "+PI*:DRAW"BM235, 147"+P2* 
4100 CIRCLE (45, 90) ,30 
4110 FOR X=0 TO PI*2 STEP PI/15 
4115 H=45-SIN(X)*30:V=90-COS(X)* 
30 

4120 LINE(H,V)-(45,V),PSET 
4125 LINE(95+23*X,V)-(95+23*X,90 
),PSET 

4130 LINE(45,90)-(H,V),PSET 
4135 SOUND 150+COS(X)*60, 1 
4140 IF X>0 THEN LINE- (45, 90) , PR 
ESET 

4145 IF X>PI THEN LINE (45, 57) - (4 
5, 123), PSET 

4148 LINE(H,V)-(45,V), PRESET 
4150 NEXT X 
4160 GOSUB 6160 

4170 cls:print:print m defining 

THE TRIG FUNCTIONS IN TERMS OF 

THE SIDES OF A RIGHTTRIANGLE IN 

CLUDES ONLY THE ACUTE ANGLES (<P I / 

2). THE DEFINITIONS MUST BE EXP 



180 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



r 




~\ 



PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

QUALITY PROGRAMS FOR YOUR 80C 

PROGRAMS REQUIRE 16K EXTENDED BASIC FOR TAPE, AND 32K DISK UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED. 



Astrology 

Truly a classic, this program will accurately cast your 
complete horoscope. You just enter the date, time, and 
place of birth. The sun sign, rising sign, mid heaven (MC), 
lunar nodes, and planetary influences including houses 
and aspects between the planets will all be calculated, and 
a full chart drawn. You can also do progressed charts and 
transits. It will even tell you the day of the weekyou were 
born. The accompanying book will help you interpret this 
chart of your horoscope. The extent of the documentation 
is tremendous, even by our exceptionally high standards, 
and no previous knowledge of the subject is required. You 
can share in this wisdom which has been used for thou- 
sands of years in many cultures. This program was written 
by a professional Astrologer. Please specify 16K or 32K 
system. $34.95 tape — $39.95 disk 



Gangbusters 

If you ever wanted to try a life of crime, this is your chance. 
You will start out as a Punk, but by using brains, and a little 
muscle, you can rise to become a Hood, Runner, Bookie, 
Torpedo, Fence, Kingpin, or win by becoming Syndicate 
Boss. Indulge yourself. Bribe a judge, or the District 
Attorney. Pay off the Cops. Take out a contract on another 
player, but watch out, they may be after you. Buy trucking 
companies, bootleg operations, houses of ill fame, but 
remember, if you get caught, you may do some hard time. 
Do you have what it takes to take over? This game will keep 
you close to your rod, get you thinking about bulletproof 
glass in your car, and definitely bring out the worst in you, 
but you'll love every minute of it. For 2 to 6 players, takes 
about 2 hours to play. Every game is excitingly different. 
$19.95 tape - $24.95 disk 



NEW THIS MONTH 



Have you been jealous of your friends when 
they play "Wizardry®" on their high priced 
computer? Your time is coming! Soon you will 
be able to play "Gateway to Glory". This 
incredible adventure, with graphics, is over 
1 60 kilobytes long, and will require a disk drive. 

NOT QUITE READY YET, 

BUT COMING SOON 

TO A COMPUTER NEAR YOU! 



Viking! 

A simulation for 1 to 4 persons. Each begins as a land- 
owner, and by farming their land, buying and selling land, 
expanding their fishing fleet, building on to their manu- 
factory, increasing their population, equiping and training 
more soldiers, and regulating theirtaxes.eachplayertries 
to increase their economic power and rank until one 
becomes ruler over all. But beware plagues, rats, raiders, 
revolts, bad weather, and other misfortunes which may lie 
alongthe road to success. Asyouprogress.seethe mapof 
your holdings increase. Playable in 1 to 2 hours, and 
different every time, you may have an addiction problem. 
$19.95 tape- $24.95 disk 



Fantasy Gamer's Package 

Two programs: The first will display your choice of 99 
different rooms in Hi-Resgraphicsatthetouchofa key. All 
standard sizes, plus some with pools, pillars, stairs, odd 
shapes, etc. Saves lots of game time spent describing 
room sizes, shapes, and door locations. Includes a super 
fast dungeon designing system and a completely keyed 
sample dungeon module — ready to play. The second 
program in the package generates COMPLETE charac- 
ters including abilities, race, classes, hit points, age, thieving 
skills, much more, and also generates monsters. This 
package was developed by an active DM, and has been 
tested in hiscampaign.20pagesof documentation. $19.95 

Fantasy Gamer's 32K Package 

Similar to our popular Fantasy Gamer's Package, but both 
the Rooms and the Character & Monster Generator are in 
memory at the same time. You make your selection from a 
menu. In addition, you can select the Dice Bag, which will 
roll just about any probability you need. $24.95 tape — 
$29.95 disk 



Ancient Wisdom Trilogy 

Three programs, each drawing on the historical wisdom of 
the ages. 

TAROT Ancient Egyptian deck of cards may reveal much. 
You can read past/present/future, circle of life, or ask a 
specific question. Lots of documentation. $1 9.95 tape — 
$24.95 disk 

I CHING A Chinese wisdom so old its very origin is 
shrouded in the mists of time. The ancient Chinese oracle 
will give an answer to your question. What will the hexa- 
gram reveal? $19.95 tape — $24.95 disk 
NUMEROLOGY What can be learned from the num- 
bers? Do a character analysis, read your destiny, or chart 
your monthly cycles. $19.95 tape — $24.95 disk 
All of these come with ample documentation — ready to be 
used immediately. ALL THREE for just $39.95 tape — 
$44.95 disk. Save almost $20.00 over separate prices. 



/^\ 



ALL Programs in this ad, including disk versions, 
carry the Rainbow certification seal! 



SEND A STAMPED, SELF-ADDRESSED LONG ENVELOPE FOR COMPLETE CATALOGUE 



v 



Your Personal check is welcome - no delay. Include 
$1.50 shipping for each program ordered. (Shipping free 
on $50.00 or larger orders). Az. residents add 4% sales 
tax. Orders shipped within two days. 



At Your Local Dealer, or 

Send Order To: PRICKLY-PEAR SOFTWARE 

9822 E. Stella Road 
Tucson, Arizona 85730 
(602) 886-1505 



ANDED IN TERMS OF A CIRCLE." 

4180 PRINT" INSTEAD OF THE AD J 

ACENT SIDE, WE USE THE HORIZONTAL 

DISTANCE BETWEEN THE CENTER OF 

THE CIRCLEAND THE END OF THE AR 

C. "5 4190 PRINT" INSTEADOF THE O 

PPOSITE SIDE, WE USE THEVERTICAL 

DISTANCE BETWEEN THE CENTER O 

F THE CIRCLE AND THE ENDOF THE A 

RC." 

4260 GOSUB 6160 

4270 CLS:T*="QUIZ": GOSUB 6000 
4275 IF LEFT*<R*,1)="Y"THEN4050 
4280 PRINT: PRINT" THE COSINE O 
F IS THE SAME AS THE COSINE O 
F:" 
4290 A*="PI " : B*="2*PI " : C*="PI /2" 

:r*="B":gosub6060 

4300 PRINT: PR I NT "FOR VALUES OF X 
LESS THAN AND GREATER THAN 2* 
PI, THE GRAPH OF COS(X) CONTINUE 
S IN THE SAME RE-PEAT I NG CURVE. 
WHAT VALUE DO YOUSUPPOSE THE COS 
<3*PI> HAS?" 

4310 a*="0" : b*=" l " : c*="-i " : r*="c 

" : GOSUB6060 

4320 PR I NT: PR I NT" HOW ABOUT COS 

(-PI/2)?" 

4330 A*="0" : B*=" 1 " : C*="-l " : R*="A 



" : GOSUB6060 

4340 IF INKEY*=""THEN4340 ELSE 2 

00 

5999 * 

6000 'TITLE ROUTINE 

6010 PRINTCHR*<241)+STRING*<LEN< 

T*> ,243>+CHR*<242> 

6020 PRINTCHR*<245)+T*+CHR*<250> 

6030 PRINTCHR*<244)+STRING*<LEN< 

T*> ,252>+CHR*<248> 

6035 IF T*="QUIZ"THEN INPUT "DO Y 

OU WANT TO SEE THE DISPLAY AG A I 

N";R* 

6040 RETURN 

6050 'QUIZ ROUTINE 

6060 PRINT:PRINTTAB(12)"A. "+A* 

6070 PRINTTAB(12) "B. "+B* 

6080 PRINTTAB(12)"C. "+C* 

6090 INPUT Q*:IF Q$OR$ THEN 609 



6100 PRINT"THAT'S RIGHT" : PLAY"T4 

A#L9EG#" 

6111 RETURN 

6150 ' TURN-THE-PAGE ROUTINE 

6160 I*=INKEY* 

6170 IF I*="L" THEN 200 

6175 IF I*= ,,n THEN 6160 

6180 RETURN 




ftware 



Silly Syntax 

a sensational and educational version 
of a popular party game for the TRS-80* 
Color Computer . . . 

For 1 to 1 players. Load a story into 
the computer. The players are asked to 
supply a noun, verb, part of body, ce- 
lebrity, etc. which the program uses to 
complete the story. The story, which is 
displayed when all words are entered, 
will be hilarious. Silly Syntax requires 
1 6K Extended Basic (32K for disk ver- 
sion). For $19.95, you get a user guide 
and a tape containing the Silly Syntax 
game and 2 stories. You can create your 
own stories or order story tapes from 
the selection below. 

Silly Syntax stories — Ten stories 
per tape. 

SS-001 - Fairy Tales 

SS-002 - Sing Along 

SS-003 - X-Rated 

SS-004 - Current Events 

SS-006 - Adventure/Sci-Fi 

SS-007 - Potpourri 

Each story tape is $9.95. 10% off for 3 

or more story tapes. Disk is $24.95 for 

Silly Syntax and 2 stories or $49.95 for 

Silly Syntax and all 62 stories. 



*TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Corp. 



Introduces" 



Auto Run 

Auto Run is a utility program forthe TRS- 
80* Extended Basic Color Computer. It 
is used to add convenience and profes- 
sionalism to your software. 

Auto Run will create a tape which will 
consist of a machine language loader 
followed by your Basic or machine lan- 
guage program. With this tape, a simple 
CLOADM command will load and start 
the loader which will load and start your 
program. You may design a title screen 
with the graphics editor which will dis- 
play as your program loads. Also you 
may record a vocal or musical introduc- 
tion preceding your program. The Auto 
Run loader will control the audio on/off. 

Basic programs can be set to load 
anywhere in memory above $600 (the 
PCLEAR page). 

Software authors: The Auto Run pre- 
fix may be appended to your software 
products. 

Auto Run is $14.95 and includes 
complete documentation and an as- 
sembly source listing. 



SUGAR SOFTWARE 

2153 Leah Lane 

Reynoldsburg, Ohio 43068 

(614)861-0565 

CIS orders EMAIL to 70405,1374 



Tape Information Management 
System 

a user-oriented, easy to use personal 
database management system with 
these outstanding features: 
*keeps files of programs, names, ad- 
dresses, birthdays, recipes, class or club 
rosters, anything 
'variable record and field lengths 
*phrase substitution editor 
*up to 8 user-definable fields 
*ML sort (up to 3 fields), search and de- 
lete functions 

*2 search modes — range and item 
'user-definable printer format, for any 
printer 

For $24.95 you get the database 
management system, our full documen- 
tation which includes a reference guide 
and a programmer's guide, and our 1981 
Bibliography of articles relating to the 
Color Computer. Requires 16K Ex- 
tended Basic. 32K recommended. 

Add $1 .00 per tape or disk for postage 
and handling. Ohioans add 5.5% sales 
tax. COD orders are welcome. Dealer 
inquiries invited. 



RAINBOW 




182 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



Software Review... 

Ready, Aim, Duck: 
It's Missile Barrage 

If you and five friends would like to have all-out war with 
each other, Missile Barrage may be your answer. The 
deployment scheme used in this video game makes just as 
much sense as any of the war tactics we read about in the 
paper, if not more sense. In Missile Barrage, everybody 
heads for the hills and digs in. The graphics provide for more 
than 60 mountain ranges and your silo/bunker is assigned 
randomly, as good a method as any. Then, you take turns 
firing missiles at each other until there's only one person left. 
That person is left alone on a pock-marked mountain top to 
lick his own wounds and make peace with himself. Sounds 
almost too plausible, doesn't it? 

Missile Barrage is a thought-provoking game. The action, 
though, is slow at first because you have to think; it takes 
you a while to learn the strategy, which is to calculate the 
exact missile launching angles and just the right velocity to 
carry your warhead right into your enemy's lap. But, be 
forewarned, don't shoot at anybody that you don't plan to 
clobber on the first try; you may not get a second try. 
Landing close to someone can be very hazardous to your 
health, if your intended target is smart. You see, if he notes 
your launching angle and velocity and then you miss, he'll 
calculate the complementary angle and use your velocity 
plus a slight correction to make up for your mistake and 
then deliver a don't care package right back to you. How 
about them apples?(Oops, I said a no-no, didn't I?) 

Don't get too worried about tipping off your enemy, 
though. One of the other four players you haven't even 
glanced at may send you both to Kingdom Come before 



either of you even have a chance to squeeze the trigger 
button. Then again, it's not too likely, because it's difficult to 
calculate the trajectories until everyone has had a good bit of 
practice. Young children, I think, would have a lot of 
trouble playing this game. Yes, I can hear it now: your 
wonderchild is only 2 l /i years old and wipes out all comers. 
Maybe so, but my mother's child has taught mathematics 
and he managed to self-destruct. I should know better than 
to admit this in print, but I decided to set the angle at 90 
degrees and fire. Result: ask your 2 l A year old — straight up 
and then straight back down, right on my own thick skull. 
There are two versions of Missile Barrage on the cassette. 
One is a slow-playing version with sound, the other a faster 
version, but no sound. Both are 1 6K. You can use the POKE 
65495,0 command to double the microprocessor speed. 
Around7?az>i^ow,this is known as the speed-up POKE, a 
contradiction in terms if ever there was one. But, even with 
the speed-up, Missile Barrage tends to bog down near the 
end of the game when only two or three combatants are left. 
This may have something to do with your combat readiness, 
because, by the last stages, you've probably had half the 
hillside and substantial parts of your missile site blown 
away. But, just because you see devastation all around you, 
don't let your guard down. You've got to keep a fire burning 
and stay alert at all times — even if your enemy has 
abandoned his base momentarily and is out of the room 
raiding the refrigerator. A missile launch malfunction may 
take place in your own backyard, triggering a red alert. If 
that happens, you'll have to take remedial actions in a 
matter of seconds or your own arsenal will light up your life 
with a vapo rub-out as you and your missile site get blown 
every which way but loose. 

(Great X-P-T, P.O. Box 9212, Livonia,MI 48150, $10.95 

on tape.) 

—Jim Reed 




STRICTLY 

COLOR 

SOFTWARE 



P.O. Box 382 
West Point PA 19486 



MISSION:EMPIRE! 

NOW FOR 16K 
Does NOT require Extended BASIC 

Some of the cute is gone, but none of the excitement and 
payability which made "The RAINBOW" say about the 32K version that 

"We recommend MISSION:EMPIRE!" 



RAINBOW 



MISSION: EMPIRE! 



for disk or cassette $1 9.95 



A strategic wargame/strategy game. Starting with one planet, incomplete intelligence and limited resources, you 
must conquer the rest of your galaxy. The game takes 2-5 hours and is DIFFERENT EVERY TIME! All versions offer 
the option of saving a game in progress. 

Specify 32K disk, 32K cassette or 1 6K version - the 32K versions require Extended BASIC, the 1 6K version does 
not. The disk version is normally shipped on a cassette with instructions for transferring to disk. If you want the 
program shipped on a disk add $3.00. 

Send check, money order or Mastercard/Visa number (including expiration date and SIGN order). Price includes shipping. PA 
residents include 6% sales tax. 

*AII programs require Color ComputertM (Tandy Corp.) or TDP System 100 Computer^ (RCA Corp.). 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 



183 



Index To the Rainbow Issues 1-9 



AI10RT «2.8<P> 

RNI MATED HANGMAN * 6. 19<R> 

AAA 

BATTLEFLEET «7.13<R> 

BERSCTK »9.23<R> 

PIORHYTHM 'B.18<R> 

BREAK KEY DISABLE '8.9 

BRICKAWAY '8.30<R> 

BRICKOUT «9.19<R> 

CARD DEALING «7.2<P> 

CBUG MONITOR <2.3<R> 

CBUG—MACHINE LANG ADDR '9.15 

CHR0MA3ETTE MAGAZINE «6.9<R> 

CIRCUS ADVENTURE '9.36<R> 

CLOAD '3.17 

COCO '9.11 

COLOR COMPUTER NEWS '9. 11<R> 

COLOR CONNECTION '4.14 

COLOR DEMO >9. 18<R> 

COLOR METEOROIDS '3.7<R> 

COLOR SPACE INVADERS '4.9<R> 

COLORCOM/E '8.31 



COLORTERM «9.29<R> 

COWPUHIND '7.16<R> 

COMPUWARE'S RAM UPGRADE '8.9<R> 

CONFLICT «4.2<R> 

CONTEST— JARBCODE '2.4 

CPR1NT »6.11<R> 

CPU— SPEED * 1.3 8.3<L> 9.3<L> 9.20 

CSAVE AID <5.2<P> 

CSAVE? =6.9 

CSAVEH <6.12 

DELTA CHANGE >4.2<P> 

DESK FOR COLOR COMP '9.16 

DISC DIR PRINTOUT «J.3KP> 

DISC FILE CONVERSIONS '7.8 

DISC SAVEM '6.1 

DISC— COLOR DISC DRIVE '7.23 

DISC— EXATRON '6.3 

DISC— INDEX »8.23<P> 9.17<C> 

D I SC— MACH I NE LANG '7.16 

DISC— POKING MEMORY '9.29 

DISC— TANDY «2.3 3.1 6.3 

DSK*INDX 'B.23<P> 9. 17<C> 



T 



K 



T 



C.C-Calc $25 

Our own Electronic Spreadsheet for the Color Coiputer is a 
sophisticated but easy to use calculating and planning 
prograi. C.C.Calc takes the drudgery out of budgeting, 
taxes, and other financial or planning activities, Wide 
reports can be printed in sections. More information & 
saiples on request. Requires 32K and Printer. 
C.C.File %7 

A nifty little data base package with lots of uses. A 
■Best Buy" at just M for both Cassette and Disk. 
C.C. Writer *30 

A quick to learn and easy to use word processor. Right 
justification, Global coaaands, etc. Works with any 
printer including daisy wheels. 16-32K Cas, 32K Disk. 
C.C. Mailer *20 

Nailing list data base for CoCo and any printer. Froi 90 
to over 1000 records depending on your systea. The 
C.C. Merger option aerges Naae and Address and can CREATE 
the salutation for C.C. Writer letters. Up to 4 line 
Address. Disk or Cassette. With C.C.Herger-*35 

Tr«n»Tek 
194 Lockwood 
Bloomingdale, IL 60108 



EDITOR MODE '2.7<C> 

EDITOR'S NOTES— *t# PRINT*-2 

EDTASM+ tg.14 

EDUCATION— GEO^STUDIES >9.39<P> 

EDUCATION— GRADER «3.4<P> 

EDUCATION— QUIZ '3. 14<P> 

EXTENDED COLOR BASIC— EDITOR '2.7<C> 

EXTENDED COLOR BASIC— LP VARIABLES '2.4<C> 

AAA 

PANT ASY— GAME AIDS '6.6 7.6 
FINANCE— AMORT >2.8<P> 
FINANCE— CHECKBOOK BALANCE '7.3 
FINANCE— TAXTAB 'B.2 <P> 9.8<P> 
FLOWCHARTS '8.13 
FOR^NEXT -8.21 

AAA 

GALLOPING GAMBLERS '7.28<R> 

GAME AIDS '6.6 7.6 8.3<L> 9.2<L> 

GAME AIDS— FRP REFEREE '9.32 

GAMES—GIN '4.9<P> 

GAMES— HELO-BATTLE '4.B<P> 

GAMES— JARBB I ORHYTHM « 5 . 6< P > 

GAMES— LASER STAR '3.1<P> 

GAMES— OH GOB '7.10<P> 

GAMES— PSYCHIC APTITUDE TEST -3.9<P> 

GAMES— SKY-EYE '9.4<P> 

GAMES— SNAIL INVADERS -8.17<P> 9. 17<C> 

GAMES— VIPERS <6.3<P> 8.26<C> 

GAMES— ZELDA'S BAT BOTTLE <6.2<P> 

GATOR ZONE '8.8<R> 

GAUNTLET '9.1B<R> 

GEO^STUDIES »9.39<P> 

GET/PUT '3.18 

GRADER '3.4<P> 

GRAPHICS =9.24 

GRAPHICS— LP VII '3.13 

GRAPHICS— TEXT '1.3 

HELO-BATTLE <4.8<P> 



JACKPOT '7.16<R> 
JARBB I ORHYTHM '3.6<P> 

AAA 

KILOBYTE -9.14 

KOSM I C KAMIKAZE >6.11<R> 



184 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 




Iragonqueat! 



In a desperate race against the sun you search for SMAEGOR Monarch of Dragonfolk, who has 
kidnapped the Princess of the Realm and holds her in a distant and unknown place. In a quest for 
Honor and glory, you must search the land, seeking out the tools needed for the ultimate 
confrontation. On The River Delta, in the abandoned Temple of Baathteski, Goddess of the 
Blade, everywhere, clues ahound. But WIIKRE is the Princess? 

Now, as never before, the genius of CHARLES KORSYTIIE shines in this new machine 
language ADVENTURE. DR AGONQUEST! Can YOU save M'lady from the iron Hutches of 
SMAEGOR? 



TAPE $15.95 Dealer Inquiries Invited 

THE PROGRAMMER'S GUILD 

BOX 66, PETERBOROUGH, N.H 03458 
(603) 924-6065 AFTER 6 PM EST 

MASTERCHARGE AND VISA ACCEPTED 



DISK $2 1 .95 



RAINBOW 

C&nWICATKM 
SEAL 



LASER STAR -3.1<P> 
LETTERS »5.7 6.7 9.2 
LINE JUSTIFIER >2.KP> 
LP VII DRIVER '1.3 2.6 
LP VII— GRAPHICS '3.13 
LP VIII— LABELS -4.10 
LUNAR LANDER >9.27<R> 

AAA 

MACHINE LRNG ADDR (POPULAR) '9.19 

MACHINE LANG TAPE COPIER '6.12<P> 8.3<L> 

MACHINE LANG— DISC DRIVE '7.16 

MANAGING OUR MONEY '7.3<P> 

MARGJEE '3.6<P> 

MASTER CONTROL 3.4<R> 

MASTER CONTROL— MACH LANG ADDR '9.19 

MEMORY =2.4 7.19 8.1 

MERGING TAPES '3.17 

MICR0W0RK3 88C DISASSEMBLER -4.4<R> 

MICROWORKS RAM UPGRADE 3. 19<R> 

MINEFIELD '9.18<R> 

MOON LANDER '9.27<R> 

MOTION PICTURE PROGRAMING '9.24 

MOTOR ON/OFF =9.30 



MULT I PEN PLOTTER '6.14 
MUSIC— MUSIC MADE EASY '1.2<P> 

AAA 

PAC ATTACK '9.37<R> 

PEEK < 23,26) '3.17 

PEEK <63314> '2.4 

PER CENT CHANGE '4.2<P> 

PI90C SERIAL/PARALLEL CONV >3.3<R> 

PIPELINE '6.14 7.23 8.13 9,26 

POKE 23,6 '2.4 

POLYGON '«.11<P> 

PRETTY PRINT -8.21 

PRINT #-2 '8.1 9.1 

PRINT FROM VIDEOTEX '4.3 

PRINT USING '4.3 

PRINTER STATUS '2.4 

PSYCHIC APTITUDE TEST «3.9<P> 

PUT/GET '3. 10 

AAA 

QUIZ >3.14<P> 

AAA 

RABBIT -9.37<R> 
RAINBOW— AIMS '1.1 



COLOR-FORTH 

Including SEhIGRAPHIC-8 EDITOR 
+ UTILITIES 

-Disk and Tape utilities 

-Boot from disk or tape 

-Graphics and Sound commands 

-Printer commands 

-Auto— repeat and Control keys 

-Fast task multiplexing 

-Unique TRACE function in kernal 

-Clean INTERRUPT handling 
in HIGH-LEVEL FORTH 

-CPU CARRY FLAG accessible 

-Game of LIFE demo 

-ULTRA FAST: written in assembler 

—Directions included for 
installing optional ROM in 
disk controller or cartridge 

-Free Basic game "RATMAZE" 



FORTH 

Hoyt Stearns Electronics 

4131 E. CANNON DR. PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85028 
602-996-1717^ 



RAINBOW— • BACK ISSUES '6.12 7.23 9.30 

RAINBOW— 8UBMITING ARTICLES '9.37 

RAM UPGRADE '3.19 8.9<R> 

REM— BIG CMNT *. 12<P> 

REM— REM-D-LEET '7.21<P> 

ROM 1.1 »6.14 

ROMPACK BACKUP «6.13<R> 9.2<L> 

ROSEN— COLOR CONECTION «4.14 

3.E.C. S. '3.16<R> 

SAVEM— DISC '6.1 

SCREEN MONITOR <4.7<P> 

SCREEN PRINT— MACH LANG ADDR '9.19 

SCREEN PRINTER '2.7<P> 3.2<C> 3.13 

SCRIPSIT '6.14 

SDS88C '3.7<R> 

SICMON 2.6<R> 

SILLY SYNTAX >8.21<R> 

SKIPF '6.9 

SKY-EYE '9.4<P> 

SNAIL INVADERS '9. 17<P> 

SOFTWARE THEFT '3.2 

SPACE WAR '6.14<R> 

SPECTACULATOR '6.14 7.23 9.43<R> 

SPORTS— STATSKEEPER '3.3<P> 

TAPE MERGE '3.17 
TAXTAB >8.2<P> 9.8<P> 

TEXT EDITOR/WORD PROCESSOR J 3.3<R> 
TIMES SQUARE HEADER '3.3<P> 



VAMPIRE '4.14<R> 
VIDEOTEX— DISC COPY '8.11 
VIDEOTEX— DOWNLOADING '3.9 

VIDEOTEX— DOWNPRINT '4.3 3. 12<C> 
VIDEOTEX— MACH LANG ADDR =9.19 
VIPERS >6.3<P> 9.26<P> 
VOLTAGE <118/38HZ> -9.2<L> 

WORD GUESS <9.19<R> 

WORD PROCESSOR '1.4<P> 

t40RD PROCESSOR-LINE JUST IF -2.1<P> 

WORD PROCESSORS '6.1<R> 7. 1<R> 8.4<R> 



ZELDA'S BAT BOTTLE '6.2<P> 



186 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



Software Review... 

Chart Your Stocks 
With FundGraf 

If you follow the stock market, you may already know 
that one of the so-called "leading stock indicators"that news 
people frequently referto is a look at what individual private 
investors are doing. It's an important indicator because 
individual investors, as a group, can be counted on to be 
wrong. If individual investors have been stampeded into 
selling, you can almost bet that the smart money will be on 
the phone yelling, "Buy! Buy!" 

So, how do we get ahead of, instead of follow, the market? 
Well, if I stumble across that answer, I'll send everybody a 
postcard from Shangri-La. Meanwhile, a giant step in 
getting to know the market, or a given stock, is to examine 
long term performance. Maybe we can spot something 
cyclical and pull off the classic "buy low, sell high" coup de 
easy street. 

A new tool for easily examining stock trends, and other 
financial doings, is Fundgraf, a stock market analysis 
program for 16K ECB. Even if you aren't Mr. or Ms. Big 
Bucks, you'll find this utility interesting, and casual 
observers will be impressed no end as you call up all sorts of 
file data and promptly graphically display it. Want to 
compare your money market fund's performance with the 
Dow Jones Industrial Average? It's a cinch. Then, compare 
both with the performance of a mutual fund you've been 
interested in by pressing a couple of keys and charting all 
three on the same graph. Wonder how Tandy Corporation 
compares with, say, Dreyfus No. 9 Fund? Chart it out with 



Fundgraf. Written in Basic, Fundgraf can be easily modified 
to keep track of your favorite stocks. 

Running the program is very simple. You pick the stock 
you wish to analyze from a name menu(Up to seven stocks. 
For more, you make a new file tape.), then you selectf rom a 
sub menu what aspect you wish to review. 

Fundgraf makes dividend adjustments and compares 
recent, or long since past, stock performance with annual 
growth rate guidelines. Or, you can pick another option and 
review "moving averages," how your stock is varying, week 
to week, from the annual growth guideline. 

You want market advice? Fundgraf provides "buy" and 
"sell" signals. It uses the point at which the moving average 
crosses the price line to indicate a buy or sell signal. This,by 
the way, is a method commonly used by "telephone switch" 
advisory services. Fundgraf 's author prefers to use the 
Thursday closing price as the weekly price, but if you're a 
Friday person, you're the boss; Fundgraf is your helper. 

An important bonus is that Fundgraf s well-written 
documentation tells you what you need to know to 
personalize this utility. It also explains how to handle stock 
splits and other head-scratching situations. 

Now, I'm not suggesting you're anything but a wheeler 
dealer, but, just in case you think of yourself as average, 
remember, the herd instinct can carry you right over the 
canyon wall. Maybe, we should determine what we think is 
the best possible move, and then do just the opposite. 
Practice what I preach? No way, Jose. At any rate, if you're 
tired of "playing" the stock market and want to get serious, 
Fundgraf is a very useful tool. 

(Parsons Software, 118 Woodshire Drive, Parkersburg, 
WY 26101, $49.95 on tape.) 



YOU'VE WANTED 
IN A COMPUTER 
AND MORE • • . 

TDP SYSTEM IOO 

A COMPLETE SYSTEM READY TO PLUG INTO YOUR COLOR T.V. SET 



ALL 



» 



MODEL 10-1 000 



Features: 

• 16K Memory 

• Expandable to 32K at any TDP Service Center 
Nationwide; and to 32/64K through Southco, 
the Georgia Distributor 

• Designer Cosmetics in White and Black 
High Impact Case 

• Raised Keyboard with Gold Contacts 
to Withstand Constant Use 

• Standard Basic Built— in (Microsoft) 

• RS232 Interface Device Built-in 
(Permits hook up with printer or telephone 
modem without purchase of the RS232, a $200.00 
extra charge on most computers.) 

• RF Interface for Direct Hook Up to any TV Built— in 

• Vast Source of High Resolution Arcade Color Games 

• Inexpensive Telewriter Word Processing 
Applications Available 

• Programming Manual (s) Included at No Charge 

• Bust Out Game Pak Included at No Charge 

• Joy Sticks Included at No Charge 

^ , j^ ^^l I ^TM ^^^^ Dealer Enquiries for Complete Information Call or Write: 

i ^9%0%0 ■ Wm%0\^ Tommy Thompson or Roy Green (404) 355-2960 

'SALES CORPORATION 1500 Marietta Blvd. N.W. Atlanta,Georgia 30318 




suggested retail 

ONLY $379 




January, 1983 the RAINBOW 187 



yfi c€ ' Corrections 

The following copy was left out of the MEM EXAM 

program in the November issue. This affects only the 
Assembly Language version. The Basic version was correct 
as printed. 

FDB *ODOD 

FCC /MEM EXAM/ 

FCB *OD 

FCC /PRESS ANY KEY/ 

FCB O 

END START 



/ 



01330 TITLE 

01340 

01350 

01360 

01370 

01380 



Here are the listing changes which belong with the regular 
Listing in Geoff Wells December GAPAD feature (page 98, 
December Rainbow. 

'ADD OR EDIT THE FOLLOWING LIN 

ES TO TEST FOR TYPO'S 

10 DIMMC*<2,2>, IN*<2),FW*<40>,SW 

* < 14) , FC* (40) , SC* ( 14) , OL (4, 1 ) , OD 

*<4) ,0K*<4) 

20 F0RNF=1T02: IN* (NF) = n *" : NEXTNF 

30 FORNF= 1 T036 : READDUMMY* : NEXTNF 

40 FORNF=1TO40:READFW*<NF),FC*<N 

F) : NEXTNF 

50 FORNF= 1 TO 1 4 : RE ADSW* ( NF ) , SC* ( N 

F) : NEXTNF 

60 F0RX=1T02:F0RY=1T02:READMC*<X 

,Y) :nexty, x 

70 FORNF=1TO4:READOL(NF,0),OL(NF 

, 1),0D*(NF) , OK*<NF> : NEXTNF 

120 FORNF= 1 T05 : READDUMMY* : I FL 1 =N 

F THENL*=DUMMY*: NEXTNF ELSENEXTN 

F 

1 30 FORNF= 1 T08 : READDUMM Y* : I FL2=N 

F THENL*=L*+DUMMY*: NEXTNF ELSENE 

XTNF 

1 40 FORNF= 1 TO 1 2 : READDUMMY* : I FL3= 

NF THENL*=L*+DUMMY$: NEXTNF ELSEN 

EXTNF 

150 F0RNF=1T011:READDUMMY*: IFL4= 

NF THENL*=L*+DUMMY*: NEXTNF ELSEN 

EXTNF 

160 0B*=" n :F0RNF=lT04: IFOL(NF,0) 

=X ANDOL(NF, 1 ) =Y THENOB*=OB$+"-" 

+OD*<NF> : NEXTNF ELSENEXTNF: IFOB* 

= iiu then0b*=" nothing special" 
611 in*<0)="":fornf=ito2: ifin*<n 
fx>"*"thenf0ri = 1t04: ifin*<nf>=0 
k*<i)thenin*<0> = in$<0>+ ,, - ,, +od*<i 
) inexti: nextnf elsenexti : nextnf 

ELSENEXTNF 

710 OPEN"0" , -1 , "GAPADFIL" : PRINT# 

-i,x, y,sc:fornf=ito2:print#-i, in 

* (NF) : NEXTNF: F0RZ=1T02: F0RW=1T02 

:print#-i 5 mc*<z,w> :nextw, z:fornf 
=1to4:print#-1,ol(nf,0) ,ol(nf, 1) 
: nextnf : close : goto i 00 

810 OPEN" I " , -1 , "GAPADFIL" : INPUT# 

-i,x, y,sc:fornf=ito2: input#-i, in 

*<NF) : NEXTNF: F0RZ=1T02:F0RW=1T02 



HOMEBASE™ 

THE 

COMPLETE 

TRS-80* COLOR COMPUTER 

DATABASE 



HOMEBASE™ PROVIDES WORD PROCESSING, DATA- 
BASE MANAGEMENT, AND SPREAD SHEET CALCULA- 
TIONS, IN ONE EASY TO USE PACKAGE. SOME OF THE 
MANY USEFUL APPLICATIONS OF HOMEBASE™ INCLUDE: 

• Check book management • Ledgers • Grocery lists • 
Shopping lists • Article indexing • Recipes • Disk directories 

• Notes • Memos • Letters • Phone lists • Customer lists • 
Business contact lists • Appointments • Mailing lists • Home 
inventory • Car maintenance scheduling • Income tax prepa- 
ration • Address lists • Charts • Newsletters • Athletic team 
records • Form letters • 

WORD PROCESSING FEATURES INCLUDE: 

- DEFINE 250 screens of text you can search, sort, display, 
of print using names you assign or using any word or 
phrase. 

- EDIT text by duplicating, moving, clearing, searching and 
replacing, deleting, or reordering entire records of text or 
any word or phrase. 

— FORMAT labels, memos, letters, and other documents for 
printing with embeded printer controls for paging, skip- 
ping lines, and changing character fonts. Program con- 
trols provide setting; right and left margins, lines per page, 
page width, horizontal tabs, and line spacing. 

DATA MANAGEMENT FEATURES INCLUDE: 

— DEFINE 50 data fields, including a comment field, in a 
single record. Dates, time of day, phone numbers and dol- 
lar amounts are automatically formatted. You may also 
define 24 scratchpad data fields. 

— REORGANIZE records by moving data fields within re- 
cords or by moving records within the file. You may sort 
records using names you assign or data. 

— MANAGE files by searching, deleting, clearing, duplicat- 
ing, and displaying any data field or record. Add, subtract, 
multiply, divide, or summarize any data field. Use any 
command on any selected group of data fields and/or 
records. 

— PRINT files using automatic formatting with options to 
print report titles, a report date, page numbers, record 
names, and data field names. Print all or selected data 
fields or records. Use standard or compressed print. Use a 
special print option to print the commentfield as a mailing 
label. 

UTILITIES FOR WORD PROCESSING AND DATA MAN- 
AGEMENT INCLUDE: 

• Generating new files from old files • Merging files • Dup- 
licating files • Moving data between files • Summarizing files 

• Moving files from diskette to diskette using one drive • 
Saving files to cassette and reloading from casette • File 
synchronizing • Print disk directory • 

HOMEBASE™ IS EASY TO USE: 

— NO PROGRAMMING REQUIRED. All options are dis- 
played in menus. HOMEBASE rM automatically requests all 
required data and edits every entry. 

— All commands are single key stroke. 

— FULL screen editing for text entry. 

— Complete cursor control for entering names, titles, notes, 
and comments. 

— 100 pages of instructions with complete descriptions of 
each command, and examples. 

— Requires 32K of memory, disk basic and only one disk 
drive. NO equipment modifications required. 

— All programs reside entirely in memory. 

— Fast response to all commands including search and sort. 

ORDER TOLL FREE 

Credit card holders call toll free: 800-334-0854 extension 887 
In North Carolina Call 800-672-0101 extension 887 

or send a check or money order for $75.00 plus $5.00 

for handling charges to: 

HOMEBASE™ COMPUTER SYSTEMS 

P.O. Box 3448 

Durham, N. C. 27702 

N.C. residents add 4% for sales tax. Allow 1 to 3 weeks for delivery. 

HOMEBASE'* is a trademark of HOMEBASE'" COMPUTER SYSTEMS, 

a subsidiary of Small Business Systems, Durham, N.C. (919) 544-5408 

'TRS-80 is a trademark of Tandy Radio Shack Inc. 



188 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



: input#-i , mc* < z , w> : nextw, z : fornf 

=1T04: INPUT#-1,OL<NF,0> ,OL(NF, 1) 
INEXTNF: CLOSE: GOTO100 
1000 IN* (0) =" " : F0RNF=1T02: IFIN* ( 
NF)=RC* THENIN*<0)="YOU ALREADY 
HAVE THE "+RC*:NEXTNF ELSENEXTNF 
1010 F0RNF=1T02: IFIN* (NF) = ,, * ,, THE 
NIN*<0>=STR*<NF> INEXTNF ELSENEXT 
NF 

1 030 FORNF= 1 T04 I I FRC*=OK* ( NF ) AND 
OL(NF,0)=X ANDOL(NF, 1 ) =Y THENIN* 
<VAL<IN*<0) ) >=OK*<NF> IOL<NF,0>=- 
1 I OL (NF, 1 ) =-1 : IN* (0) =" " : NEXTNF E 
LSENEXTNF 

1 100 IN* (0) =" " : F0RNF=1T02: IFIN* ( 
NF)=RC* THENIN*<0)="*"HN*<NF> = " 
* " : FORCIO 1 T04 : I FOK* ( CK ) =RC* THEN 
OL(CK,0)=X:OL(CK, d=y:nextck els 
ENEXTCK INEXTNF ELSENEXTNF 
10000 DATA IN ,ON , BELOW , BESIDE 

, FACING 
10010 DATA A DARK ,A DAMP ,A TWI 
STING ,A LARGE ,A SMALL ,A HUGE 
,A TINY ,A SINISTER 
10020 DATA DARK , DAMP , DUSTY ,SI 
NISTER , SHALLOW , DEEP , SMELLY ,F 
OWL SMELLING , FOGGY , PLEASENT ,S 
UNNY ,RAT INFESTED 

10030 DATA ROOM, PASSAGE, CORRIDOR 
, R I VER , LAKE , P I T , BEDROOM , DUNGEON , 
ST A I CASE , L I BR AR Y , K I TCHEN 
30000 DATA LAM,ABCJOQV,SWO,ABCJO 
Q, GOB, ABCJQ, RIN, ABCJOQ, DOO, CDEFH 
IJQU,TAB,CJQUV,CHA,CJQUV,DES,CEF 
H I JQUV , HAT , ABC JMQ , GLA , ABC JQV , LEV 
,CJQ,BOO,ABCEFJNQ,GAT,CEFHIJQU,H 



AN,CJPQ 

40000 DATA *SE***02030809,N*E*** 

0307121 1 , *S*W**05040605, N**W**01 

020303 

50000 DATA 1,1, A SMALL GOLDEN RI 

NG, RING, 1,2, A JEWEL ENCRUSTED MA 

GIC SWORD, SWORD, 2, 1, A BOOK OF MA 

GIC SPELLS,B00K,2,2,A SILVER GOB 

LET FILLED WITH WINE, GOBLET 

Software Review... 

This Eat-And-Run 
Is 4K Fun 

Color Scarfman is something unusual, a machine 
language game for the 4K 80C. People with 16K should take 
a good look at this maze-gobble game; don't let the fact that 
it was made for the 4K machine stop you! 

The graphics in Color Scarfman are very well done, 
although in one of the lower resolution modes. The 
Scarfman looks like a square "c," and the monsters look a 
little block-like. But, they move quite smoothly, and you 
soon forget how they look as you get into the game. 

The maze is very compact, but surprisingly easy to move 
through (but not too easy, though). Movement is a bit 
restricted in the area around the center power "+." The 
monsters turn blue when eaten, but their change in status 
helps keep the game from getting too easy. 

Because it's made to work on a 4K machine, there's only 
one level of play — hard. The game gets harder with each new 
board, so it's far from easy to master. 

Color Scarfman has on-screen scoring, and also, what 
more games should have, an option for using the keyboard 
instead of the joysticks, if you like. 

I had my doubts at first that a Pac-Man type game made 
to run on a 4K 80C would be challenging enough for me. But 
Color Scarfman met, and exceeded, my expectations! 
(THE CORNSOFT GROUP, 6008 North Keystone, 
Indianapolis, IN 46220, $19.95) 



P.O. Box 513 

LASALLE QUE. 

H8P 3J4 

CANADA 



We are Canada's largest importer of 
software for the Color Computer! 

* Avoid the hassles and surcharges of 
importing directly from the U.S. 

* Avoid Customs Problems. 

* Save Time and Money. 
Choose from our vast selection of 
quality software and pay in CDN 
FUNDS. 

ORDERS: 

Write or call us 

* Personal cheques O.K. 

* COD's Under $100 add $1.50 (Postal 
Rate) 

* Quebec Residents Only Add 9% Sales 
Tax 

CATALOGS: 

Send $1 (refundable on first order), 
we'll send you our present catalog and 
we will insertyou in our mailing listforfree 
future updates. 



! CANADIANS ! 
F & T SOFTWARE 



This Month F&T Features 
SPECTRAL ASSOCIATES 

KEYS OF THE WIZARD 

Super new text Adventure game, three 
skill levels and a cassette save feature. 
An Extremely challenging and gripping 
game! Clues provided on request. 
16K Cassette CDN $26.00 

NEW! 

GALAX ATTAX 

Fast challenging action game with 
rows of alien attackers swooping down 
on your ship! Bonus ships. Highest 
resolution. Machine Language. 
16K Cassette CDN $28.00 

SPACE WAR 

Command only remaining combat 
viper and break through enemy fighters 
and the Death Star! Highest resolution. 
Machine Language. We consider it a 
classic! 
16K Cassette CDN $29.50 



Inquiries and Orders 

Call (516) 365-5392 

Between 1-7 p.m. 

(E.S.T.) 



UTILITIES 

Compuvoice CDN $55.00 

Soundsource & Cable CDN $33.00 

Bugout Monitor CDN $28.00 

Magic Box CDN $33.00 

GAMES 
NEW 

Planet Invasion CDN $28.00 

Defense CDN $28.00 

CCThello CDN $21.00 

ALSO 

Laser Command CDN $1 7.50 

Cosmic Super Bowl CDN $22.00 

Minotar CDN $27.50 

Ghost Gobbler CDN $29.50 

Graphic Animator CDN $1 7.00 

BOOKS 

Spectra I -The Facts CDN $22.00 
McGraw-Hill-6809 Assembly 

Language Programming CDN $24.00 

ArcSoft— 101 Program Tips & 

Tricks for the Color 

Computer CDN $14.00 



FREE SHIPPING & HANDLING - NO HIDDEN CHARGES - CANADIAN $$ 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 189 



RAINBOW ; 




Utility... 

SignVp And 
Have A Banner Day 

by David Steyer 

Did you try my screen print program in the September 
Rainbow! Those among you who did may recall my 
mentioning that you could also use the program to print 
banners. And, you can. But, while you can use it for that 
purpose, it wasn't designed with that use specifically in 
mind. Thus, it could prove clumsy at times. That's why I've 
written Banner, a fair-sized, flexible program that easily 
creates giant-letter banners on your fanfold printer paper. 

Banner uses the full ASCII character set^on either 80- or 
132-column printers. It also features height and width 
control as well as an optional inverse function. 

The program is self-explanatory, so, even if you're just 
learning to use your new Christmas-gift printer you gave 
yourself, key in this program and be the first in your 
neighborhood to write a block-long banner. A really long 
banner would require running the program over and over, 
but, theoretically, the banner could be as long as your 
paper — 500 sheets, about 500 feet of banner. That would be 
a chore, but a nice six-foot banner is a piece of cake with 
Banner. It might be just the thing to use to say thank you to 
those who gave you computer stuff for Christmas. 

There is a drawback to Banner though. It's fairly obvious 
that it has the potential to be a paper hog if your message is a 
long one. Let's say you want to write "THANK YOU VERY 
MUCH, AUNT MABEL AND UNCLE GEORGE FOR 
THE BEAUTIFUL NECKTIE! IT'S JUST WHAT I 
ALWAYS WANTED." With a good supply of paper and a 
good supply of patience, you could add a paragraph or two 
and make a banner long enough to reach to their house — 
even if it's in the next state. Novel, but impractical. 

Your solution is Sign, which will make — what else — 
signs. Little signs, bigger signs, but not as big as Banner. 
Making computer signs is fun and easy to do. I'll leave it to 
your imagination as to what to write. Just follow the 
prompts on the on-screen instructions. 

A couple of program notes. Yes, both programs which 
follow will work with non-graphic printers; that's the idea — 
to produce graphic displays on non-graphic machines. Of 
course, these listings will be helpful for those with graphics 



printers, too. As written, however, the Sign program won't 
work on Radio Shack's Line Printer VII or L.P. VIII. 

We used an Epson MX-80F/T to print the greatly 
reduced samples which appear at the beginning of each 
listing, but we are confident that many other printers can be 
used, too. 

So, give it a go. Stock in a freightcar load of paper and 
maybe you'll get your name in the Guiness Book of World 
Records, . . . for something. 

The listings: 



| i ! M | 



Mm 



:;:;:r;;::;:;;;u:; 
UiiiilliiilHSiffifi 

* * * * i * » B * * * * * • • * * 

**«* * * * * * *l * « < * * ' 




'is 

It 



************ 

************ 
*.***<******** 



• * * * * 

!***♦< 

*!***<*< 
*•***'*• 



til 



tit % 



R * BY 



PRINT 
LG=80 
ELSE 

( 1 - 
HH<1 



60 CLEAR 250 
70 DIM A*<3> ,D*<4> ,E*<6> 
80 GOSUB 580 
90 CLS:PRINT M * B A N N E 
DAVID STEYER " 
100 INPUT" 80 OR 132 COLUMN 
ER (8/13) M ;LG: IF LG=8 THEN 
ELSE IF LG=13 THEN LG=132 
100 
110 PR I NT "CHARACTER HEIGHT 

"; int<lg/10) "> M ; : inputhh: if 

OR HH>INT(LG/10) THEN 110 
120 PR INT "CHARACTER WIDTH ( 1 - 
10 )":IF LG=80 THEN PRINT" (5 OR 
LESS RECOMMENDED) 

130 INPUTWDIIF WD<1 OR WD>10 THE 
N 120 

140 INPUT" INVERSE <Y/N)"5Y*:IF Y 
*="Y" THEN Y*=" " ELSE Y*="l" 
150 PRINT"ENTER BANNER TEXT (32 
CHARACTER LIMIT) " 
160 LINEINPUT TX* 

170 IF TX*="" OR LEN(TX*)>32 THE 
N 150 
180 A*=A*<RY) 



ARE YOUR WALKING FINGERS GETTING FOOTSORE ? 

Tired of typing in all those long, but wonderful, programs from each issue of the RAINBOW? Now you can get RAINBOW ON TAP€ and 
give those tired fingers a rest! With RAINBOW ON TAP€, you'll be able to spend your time enjoying programs instead of 
typing.. .typing. ..typing them! All you ever need do again is pop a RAJNBOW ON TAP€ cassette into your recorder, CLOAD and RUN any 
one you want. 

RAINBOW ON TAPE is available as a single issue for $6.50 or on a yearly subscription basis for only $60. It is the perfect complement to 
the RAINBOW itself. 

VISA and MasterCard accepted. All subscriptions begin with the current issue and no back issues of tapes are available at this time. 
# §u(pscriptions # sent first class mail to coincide with the arrival of your current issue of tie RAINBOW. 



YESi Sign me up for RAINBOW ON TAP€ I want: 

A Full Year for $60 



A Month for$6.50 (Specify Month 



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Address 
Oty 



.State. 



Zip 



D Payment Enclosed 
Account # 



D Charge my VISA account 
Signature 



D Charge my MasterCard account 
_ Card Expires Interbank # _ 



190 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



190 PM0DE4, UPCLSl: SCREEN 1,0 

200 IF Y*=" " THEN PCLS0 

210 FOR 1=1 TO LEN<TX*) 

220 A=ASC<MID*<TX*, 1,1) ) -32 

230 IF A<24 THEN RY=0 ELSE IF A< 

47 THEN RY=1 ELSE IF A<70 THEN R 

Y=2 ELSE RY=3 

240 A=A-(RY*23) 

250 FOR X=0 T04 

260 IF A=0 THEN Y=0:GOTO 280 

270 Y=VAL( ,, &H ,, +MID$<A$<RY> , ( (A-l 

>*10) + <X*2>+1,2) ) 

280 D*<X)=" 

290 IF YM27 THEN Y=Y-128: D$ <X )= 

II 4 II 

300 IF Y>63 THEN Y=Y-64: D* <X >=LE 

FT*(D$<X) ,1)+"1 

310 IF Y>31 THEN Y=Y-32: D* <X ) =LE 

FT*<D*<X),2>+"1 

320 IF Y>15 THEN Y=Y-16: D* (X )=LE 

FT*<D$<X) ,3)+"l 

330 IF Y>7 THEN Y=Y-8: D* (X ) =LEFT 

$<D*<X> ,4>+"l 

340 IF Y>3 THEN Y=Y-4: D* <X )=LEFT 

*<D*<X>,5>+ M 1 " 

350 IF Y>1 THEN Y=Y-2: D* <X >=LEFT 

*<D*<X>,6>+"1 M 

360 IF Y>0 THEN D* ( X >=LEFT* <D* ( X 

),7)+"l" 

370 NEXT X 

380 E*<0)=LEFT*<D*<0>,5> 



390 E*<1 
D*<1>,2> 
400 E*<2 
410 E*<3 
D$<2) ,4) 
420 E*<4 
D*<3>, 1) 
430 E*<5 
440 E*<6 
D$<4> ,3) 
450 FORX 
460 IF M 
RESET (Y+ 



) =RIGHT* <D* (0) , 3) +LEFT* ( 

)=MID*(D*(1),3,5) 
>=RIGHT*<D*<1>, 1>+LEFT*< 

)=RIGHT*<D$<2) ,4)+LEFT$< 

>=MID*<D*<3>,2,5> 

) =RIGHT* <D$ (3) , 2) +LEFT$ ( 

=0 TO 6: FOR Y=l TO 5 
ID$<E$<X),Y, 1)=Y$ THEN P 
(I-l)*8,3+X) ELSE PSET(Y 



+ (I-1)*8,3+X) 

470 NEXT Y,X 

480 NEXT I 

490 FOR I=LEN<TX$)*8 TO STEP-1 

500 FOR Y=l TO 10 

510 IF PPOINT(I,Y)=0 THEN B*=B$+ 

STRING* <HH, "*"> ELSE B*=B*+STRIN 

G*<HH," M ) 

520 NEXTY 

530 FOR R=l TO WD: PRINT#-2, STRIN 

G* ( INT (LG-LEN <B*) ) /2, 32) ; B*: NEXT 

R 
540 B*="" 
550 NEXT I 

560 PRINT#-2," * B A N N E R 

* BY: DAVID STEYER 1982 RAINB 
OW MAGAZINE"; STRING* (10, 10) 



"TRS80 color 



From the January 
Club newsletter 



1981 issue of the CSRA Computer 






There was some amusement at the Novem- 
ber meeting when the Radio Shack repre- 
sentatives stated that the software in the 
ROM cartridges could not be copied. This 
month s 68 Micro Journal reported they had 
disassembled the programs on ROM by 
covering some of the connector pins with 
tape They promise details next month Never 
tell a hobbyist something cant be done' This 
magazine seems to be the only source so far 
of technical informations on the TRS-80 color 
computer" Devoted to SS-50 6800 and 
6809 machines up to now 68 Micro Journal 
plans to include the TRS-80 6809 unit in 
future issues. 

NOTE This and other interesting and needed articles 
for the Radio Shack TRS-80 color computer "" are being 
included monthly in 68 Micro Journal— The Largest 
spectalty computer magazine in the world! 

68 MICRO JOURNAL 

5900 Cassandra Smith Road 
Hixson. Tennessee 37343 

615 842-4600 

Subscription Rates 



USA: 1-year $24.50; 2-year $42.50; 3-year $64.50 
CANADA and MEXICO: Add $5.50 per year to USA Price 
Foreign Surface: Add $12.00 per year to USA Price 

Foreign AIRMAIL: Add $36.00 per year to USA Price 

** Sample issue - $3.50 




68 Micro Journal* was established with one objective in 
mind; to provide a Magazine FOR 68xx Users BY 68xx 
Users. Because of a strict advertiser policy, 68 Micro 
Journal" has gained a strong following WORLDWIDE 
because the reader KNOWS what he is getting when 
purchasing from a 68 Micro Journal" Advertiser. It has 
gained a strong User following because most of the 
material published is contributed BY USERS, and, 
therefore, is relevant to the Users needs. 

Currently, and even before the Color Computer" hit the 

stores, 68 Micro Journal"* was devoting more space to 

the TRS-80C Color Computer'" and information concerning 

the Motorola 6809 (which is the CPU in the Color 

Computer") than ANY OTHER Comput er M,aga i i n & » Examples 

i nclude: 

REVIEWS of the three major Disk Control Systems for 

the Color Computer", most of the Monitors, 

Assemblers, and Disassemblers, Word Processors and 

Editors, "Terminal" Programs (for use with Modems, 

Communications with other Computers, etc.), artd of 

course, Games. 

HINTS for Expanding Memory, Power Supply Cooling, re- 
pairing sticky keyboards, disabling the ROM PAK "Take 
Over", hooking up to Printers, etc. 

DISCUSSIONS of the 6883 Synchronous Address 
Multiplexer, using the Color Computer" with 64K and 
96K memory (which it is ALREADY capable of handling}, 
thoughts on Programming, etc. 

I suggest that you subscribe to 68 Micro Journal™, SOON, 
as many back issues are sold-out. 

We still, and will continue to, lead in the type 
information you need to FULLY UTILIZE the POWER of the 
6809 in the Rqdio Shack TRS-80 Color Computer". 



Bob Nay t/ 
Color Computer Editor 



J 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 191 



570 END 

580 A* ( ) = " 63 1 8C03 1 8052800000000 

2B60DA8007568E2D5C0C644444C60452 

88AC9A01 1 10000000088842082082084 

222000 1 1 DF7 1 0000 1 09F2 1 0000000C6 1 

1 00000 1 F000000000003 1 80004444400 

074675CC5C023084211C074426443E07 

44260C5C0 1 1 95F 1 0840FC2 1 E0C5C0746 

1E8C5C0FC44442100" 

590 A* ( 1 ) = " 7462E8C5C07462F0C5C00 

3 1 80630006300C6 1 1 000888820820003 

E0F8000820822220074444200807442D 

AD98022A3 1 FC620F463E8C7C0746 1 084 

5C0F463 1 8C7C0FC2 1 E843E0FC2 1 E8420 

0746 1 0BC5C08C63F8C6207 1 0842 1 1 C03 

8842 1 49808C A98 A4 A20842 1 0843E08EE 

B58C6208C7359C620 " 

600 A* (2) = M 746318C5C0F463E842007 

463 1 ACDE0F463E A4 A207460E0C5C0F90 

842 1 0808C63 1 8C5C08C63 1 8A8808C635 

AEE208C544546208C5442 1 080F844E44 

3E0390842 1 0E004 1 04 1 0400E 1 0842 1 38 

023AA42 1 0800 1 1 1 F4 1 00000000000000 

1 C 1 7C5E0843D 1 8C5C000 1 F084 1 E0085 

F 1 8C5C000 1 D 1 F4 1 C0 " 

610 A*<3)= M 0191E42100001F1785C08 

43D 1 8C62020 1 842 1 1 C0 1 0042 1 4980842 

32E4A206 1 0842 1 1 C0003D5AD6A0003D 1 

8C62000 1 D 1 8C5C0003D 1 F420000 1 F 1 78 



420003D1 84200001 F0707C0023C8420C 
00023 1 8C5C00023 1 8A880002B5AD5C00 
022A22A200023 1 784C0003E2223E0 " 
620 RETURN 



60 CLEAR 250 

70 DIM A*<3),D*<4),E*<6> 

80 GOSUB 550 

90 CLSlPRINT" * S I G N * BY: 

DAVID STEYER " 

100 INPUT "80 OR 132 COLUMN PRINT 

ER (8/13) M 5LG: IF LG=8 THEN LG=80 

ELSE IF LG=13 THEN LG=132 ELSE 
100 

110 INPUT M HOW MANY LINES" ; LN: IF 
LN<1 THEN 110 ELSE IF LNM0 THEN 

PR I NT "ARE YOU SURE YOU WANT"LN" 
LINES"; : INPUT Z*:IF LEFT*<Z*,1>< 
>"Y" THEN 110 
120 DIMTX* (LN) : PRINT: PRINT"ENTER 



SOUTHERN SOFTWARE SYSTEMS 

Presenting ... THE GRAPH ZAPPER 

Get serious with your 80-C, 
THE GRAPH ZAPPER makes plotting graphs on your 80-C a breeze 

• High resolution graphs with on screen numbers and labels. 

• Plots data such as electric use, stock prices, weight loss, gasoline uses, 
baby's growth, jogging distance. 

• Also plots equations that you supply (remember your old math class?) 

• Multiple lines on one graph - mix equations and data. 

• Save data for later graphing or editing. 

• Sophisticated data editor makes changing data simple. 

• Disk version has added features including storing completed graphs 
on disk and menu driven file loading. 

• Hard copies possible with common screen print programs - not supplied. 

• Low resolution graphs can't compare. 

• More than 15 pages of clear explanation of all features. 

• Both versions require Ext. Color Basic, and are delivered on cassette. 

• 1 4 day money back guarantee. 



RAINBOW 

CERTIFICATION 
SEAL 

SOUTHERN SOFTWARE SYSTEMS 



$15.95 $19.95 

for 1 6K tape version for 32K disk version 

Add $1.00 for Shipping • Send Check or Money Order 

SOUTHERN SOFTWARE SYSTEMS 

485 South Tropical Trail, Suite 109 • Merritt Island, Florida 32952 • (305) 452-2217 



192 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



AND NOW . . . 
A WORD FROM THE SPONSOR 

To me, one of the most enjoyable parts of RadioShack's monthly 
sale flyers in years past was always the short column entitled 
F/yers('de Chat by Lew Kornfeld, Radio Shack's president. Now 
that Mr. Kornfeld has retired, I miss those monthly little chats, for 
they always brightened up an otherwise dry flyer. 

To continue the tradition, I've decided to cheer up our dry Star- 
Kits ad with my own little chat each month. Until some of you come 
up with a better title, I'll call it A Word From the Sponsor. (In fact, 
here is the formal announcement of a contest: the reader 
suggesting the best title for this column by March 15th, 1983 will win 
one free program of his choice from the Star-Kits catalog. If the 
winner has already purchased the program he wants he will receive 
twice the list price of the program. Our decision in choosing a 
winner is final. Hope that adds a bit of life to these advertisements 
for a while!) 

Star-Kits is paying this magazine to bringyou this column-for two 
reasons. First of all, as many readers of my Kilobaud Klassroom 
and Thoughts on 68xx Systems series in MICROCOMPUTING 
Magazine may remember, I love to write articles. But I also like the 
opportunity to tell you a bit about Star-Kits products. Though I 
could do that in a regular article, I don't feel it's right to use the 
editorial pages of a magazine to blow your own horn. 

In the coming months, I will include here a variety of useful 
information about our programs, and about the Color computer in 
general. With that as a beginning, here goes. 

Here is an interesting use for PRINT #. The Basic manual 
explains that PRINT outputs to the screen, PRINT #-2 is for the 
printer, and PRINT #-1 is used for a tape file. What it doesn't say is 
that (a) PRINT #0 outputs to the TV Screen just as a plain PRINT 
does, and (b) that a variable can be used after the # sign. 

This means that a statement like PRINT #P will output to the 
screen if P equals 0, but print on the printer if P equals -2. 

We use this feature in our CHECK 'N TAX home accounting 
program. At the beginning of the program, we have the statements 

100 INPUT "OUTPUT TO TV OR PRINTER?"; A$ 

110 A$ = LEFT$(A$,1) 

120 IF A$ = "T" THEN P= : GOTO 140 

130 IF A$ = "P" THEN P= -2 ELSE GOTO 100 

This sets P equal to Ofor TV screen output, or -2 for output to the 
printer. Later on, we use PRINT #P, and the computer outputs to 
the desired device. 

This trick can also be used for testing programs which use disk or 
tape files. Use PRINT #P for outputting to the file, but let P equal 
for testing purposes. Later change it to -1 for tape or +1 for disk. 

Next time I'll try to provide more useful tidbits about our favorite 
computer. In the meantime, if you have any topics you'd like 
discussed, drop me a note. 

If you need information about any Star-Kits product, the manual 
is available for $5 (except STAR-DOS whose manual is $10). If you 
buy the manual, we will give you credit for its price toward a future 
order. 

See you next month . . . 



V'jdjuK OcSWUa^ 



SPELL f N FIX 

Regardless of whose text processor you use, let SPELL 'N FIX find 
and fix your spelling and typing mistakes. It reads text faster than 
you can, and spots and corrects errors even experienced 
proofreaders miss. It is compatible with all Color Computer text 
processors, including Telewriter and Radio Shack's Scripsit! (See 
the review in 80 Micro, November 1982.) $69.29 in the Radio Shack 
disk or cassette versions; $89.29 in the Flex version. (20,000 word 
dictionary is standard; optional 75,000 word Super Dictionary costs 
$50 additional.) 

HUMBUG — THE SUPER MONITOR 

A complete monitor and debugging system which lets you input 
programs and data into memory, list memory contents, insert 
multiple breakpoints, single-step, test, checksum, and compare 
memory contents, find data in memory, start and stop programs, 
upload and download, save to tape, connect the Color Computer to 
a terminal, printer, or remote computer, and more. HUMBUG on 
disk or cassette costs just $39.95. 

STAR-DOS 
A Disk Operating System specially designed for the Color 
Computer, STAR-DOS is fully compatible with your present Color 
Computer disk format — it reads disks written by Extended Disk 
Basic and vice versa. But with STAR-DOS you can use machine 
and assembly language programs to do things Basic can't. Just 
$49.95. 

ALL IN ONE — Editor Etc. 

Three programs in one — a full function Editor for text or program 
files; a Text Processor for formatting and printing text files with 
centering, justification, and paging, and a Mailing List and Mailing 
Label program which can even generate individually adressed 
letters for each person (or selected persons) on your mailing list. All 
this for just $50. Requires STAR-DOS and 32K. 

DBLS for Data Bases 

DBLS stands for Data Base Lookup System. A super-fast system 
for searching for a selected record in a sequential disk file. Supplied 
with SPELL 'N FIX's 20,000 word dictionary as a sample data file — 
lets you look up the spelling of any word in under FOUR seconds. 
Priced at $29.95. Requires STAR-DOS. 

CHECK 'N TAX 

Home accounting package combines checkbook maintenance and 
income tax data collection. Written in Basic for either RS Disk or 
Flex, $50. 

REMOTERM 

REMOTERM — allows full operation of the Color Computer from 
an external terminal. $19.95. 

NEWTALK 

NEWTALK — a memory examine utility for machine language 
programmers which reads out memory contents through the TV 
set speaker. $20. 

SHRINK 

SHRINK — our version of Eliza, in machine language and 
extremely fast. $15. 

OXXO 

OXXO — our version of Othello, also machine language and fast. 

$15. 

We accept cash, check, COD, Visa, or Master Card. NY State 

residents please add appropriate sales tax. 



Star-Kits 



RAINBOW 



P.O. BOX 209-R 

MT. KISCO, N.Y. 10549 

(914) 241-0287 





(C) 1982 
32K Machine Language 

$24.95 TAPE 
$27.95 DISK 

ARCADE 
ACTION 

This game con- 
tains all 4 screens 
like the popular ar- 
cade game. The 
actual screen 
photos shown are 
only 2 of the four 
contained in this 
program. 

Actual T.V. 
Screen 
Photos. 




How high can you climb? 
Plays like the popular 
arcade game! 




fOU* full graphic screens. 

Exciting sound and realistic 

graphics. Never before has 

the color computer seen a 

game like this. 

Early reviews say simply 

outstanding. 



"This is the best Color Computer 
program I have ever seenr 
-Bob Rosen. NYC 



TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

For The Color Computer and The TDP-100 



"This is a really slick, neat and 
outstanding game." 

—John Brlssie, Greenville, SC 




3424 College, N.E., Grand Rapids, Ml 49505 • (616)364-4791 



Add $1.00 Postage & Handling 
Michigan Residents Add 4% Sales Tax 



Top Royalties Paid 
Looking For New Software 



m 



TEXT ( "INT ( (LG-2) /7) "CHARACTERS 

PER ROW )":PRINT" "+STRI 
NG$<INT< (LG-2)/7) , "*"> 
130 FORI=l TO LN 

140 PRINT"LINE"I; ILINE INPUT TX* 
(I): IF LEN(TX*(I) )>INT< <LG-2>/7> 

THEN PR I NT "TOO LONG, TRY AGAIN" 
IGOTO 140 ELSE IF TX$(I>="" THEN 

TX$(I>=" " 
150 NEXT I 
160 A$=A*<RY> 

1 70 PM0DE4 , 1 : PCLS 1 : SCREEN 1 , 
180 LINE(0,0)-<LG-l,LN*8+2> , PRES 
ET,B 

190 FORJ=l TO LN 
200 FOR 1=1 TO LEN<TX$<J)> 
210 A=ASC<MID$<TX$<J> , I, 1) ) -32 
220 IF A<24 THEN RY=0 ELSE IF A< 
47 THEN RY=1 ELSE IF A<70 THEN R 
Y=2 ELSE RY=3 
230 A=A-<RY*23> 
240 FOR X=0 T04 
250 IF A=0 THEN Y=0:GOTO 270 
260 Y=VAL<"&H"+MID*<A$<RY>, ( <A-1 
)*10)+<X*2>+1,2> ) 
270 D*<X>=" 
280 IF Y>127 THEN Y=Y-128: D$ < X >= 

II 4 II 

290 IF Y>63 THEN Y=Y-64: D* ( X ) =LE 




CAN YOU AFFORD $1 A WEEK? 
The CCW Newsletter will give you this if you can: 

• An issue loaded with program listings of all sorts 
{for just a buck a week—unbelievable)\ 

• Latest news and information — if it happens on 
Monday you'll know about it by Friday 

( for a mere 100 cents a week) ! 

• Mailed out to you first class every week! 

{A t last a reason to live from week to week) ! 

• Free software/hardware manufacturer's directory 
{This alone is worth the price of the subscription, and 
we even send regular updates to subscribers.)*. 

All it takes is ten thin dimes a week to bring meaning to your 
life. Cumulatively we'll take payment in the following ways: 

□ Charge my Visa or MasterCard at once for 
the full amount ($52/year) 

D Charge my Visa or MasterCard quarterly 

at the rate of $13 every three months 
D Here's my check for $14 for the first quarter, bill me 

in three months for the next quarter (we have to charge 

you extra to send out those bills) 

□ Here's my check for $52 for the full year 
hurry and send me my first issue 

Name 



Address 


Citv 




State 


ZiD 


□ Visa D MC 


Exp. Date 


# 




Tiny Signature 









Send to: CCW • P.O. Box 1355 • Boston, MA 02205 



FT$<D$(X>, 1>+"1 

300 IF Y>31 THEN Y=Y-32: D* (X ) =LE 

FT$<D$<X> ,2>+"l 

310 IF Y>15 THEN Y=Y-16: D* (X ) =LE 

FT*(D$<X> ,3>+"l 

320 IF Y>7 THEN Y=Y-8:D* (X) =LEFT 

$<D$<X> ,4>+"l 

330 IF Y>3 THEN Y=Y-4:D$ ( X ) =LEFT 

$<D$<X> ,5>+"l " 

340 IF Y>1 THEN Y=Y-2:D* (X) =LEFT 

$<D$<X> ,6>+"l " 

350 IF Y>0 THEN D$ (X) =LEFT$ <D$ (X 

) ,7>+"l" 

360 NEXT X 

370 E*<0)=LEFT$<D*<0> ,5) 

380 E$<1)=RIGHT$<D$<0> ,3>+LEFT*< 

D$<1>,2> 

390 E$<2)=MID$<D$<1> ,3,5) 

400 E$<3)=RIGHT$<D$<1> , 1 > +LEFT$ < 

D$<2> ,4) 

410 E$<4)=RIGHT*<D*<2> ,4>+LEFT$< 

D$<3> , 1) 

420 E$<5)=MID$<D$<3> ,2,5) 

430 E$<6)=RIGHT$<D$<3> ,2>+LEFT$< 

D$<4>,3> 

440 FORX=0 TO 6: FOR Y=l TO 5 

450 IF MID*<E$<X),Y, 1)= ,, 1" THEN 

PRESET (Y+ ( 1-1 ) *7+2, 2+X+ ( J-l ) *8> 

460 NEXT Y,X 

470 NEXT I 

480 NEXT J 

490 FOR Y=0 TO LN*8+2 

500 FOR X=0 TO LG-1 

510 IF PPOINT(X,Y)=0 THENPRINT#- 

2, "O^+CHR* (8) +" + ,, +CHR* (8) + ,, #" ; E 

LSE PRINT#-2, " M ; 

520 NEXT X,Y 

530 PRINT#-2, M * S I G N 

* BY: DAVID STEYER 1982 R 
AINBOW MAGAZINE"; STRING* (10, 10) 
540 END 

550 A* ( ) = " 63 1 8C03 1 8052800000000 
2B60DA8007568E2D5C0C644444C60452 
88AC9A01 1 10000000088842082082084 
222000 1 1 DF7 1 0000 1 09F2 1 0000000C6 1 
1 00000 1 F000000000003 1 80004444400 
074675CC5C0230842 1 1C074426443E07 
44260C5C0 1 1 95F 1 0840FC2 1 E0C5C0746 
1E8C5C0FC44442100 M 

560 A* ( 1 ) = " 7462E8C5C07462F0C5C00 
3 1 80630006300C6 1 1 000888820820003 
E0F8000820822220074444200807442D 
AD98022A3 1 FC620F463E8C7C0746 1 084 
5C0F463 1 8C7C0FC2 1 E843E0FC2 1 E8420 
0746 1 0BC5C08C63F8C6207 1 0842 1 1 C03 
8842 1 49808C A98 A4 A20842 1 0843E08EE 
B58C6208C7359C620 " 

570 A* ( 2 ) = " 7463 1 8C5C0F463E842007 
463 1 ACDE0F463E A4 A207460E0C5C0F90 
842 1 0808C63 1 8C5C08C63 1 8A8808C635 



January, 1983 



the RAINBOW 195 



AEE208C544546208C5442 1 080F844E44 
3E0390842 1 0E004 1 04 1 0400E 1 0842 1 38 
023AA42 1 0800 1 1 1 F4 1 00000000000000 
1 C 1 7C5E0843D 1 8C5C000 1 F084 1 E0085 
F 1 8C5C000 1 D 1 F4 1 C0 " 

580 A*<3)="0191E42100001F1785C08 
43D18C620201 8421 1C0100421 4980842 
32E4A206 1 0842 1 1 C0003D5AD6A0003D 1 
8C62000 1 D 1 8C5C0003D 1 F420000 1 F 1 78 
420003D184200001F0707C0023C8420C 
00023 1 8C5C00023 1 8A880002B5AD5C00 
022A22A200023 1 784C0003E2223E0' 
590 RETURN 



/S^ 



Software Review.,. 

CoCo Slots Draws 
A Three-Cherry Review 

One of the first things that struck this reviewer about 
Co Co Slots is that it accepts only silver dollars. On my rare 
visits to gambling territories, I've always searched for the 
nickel slot machines — usually quite in vain, but the dollar 
machine. ...gulp. CoCo Slots, if you haven't guessed by now, 
is a slot machine program and is as well done a computerized 
one-armed bandit as I can imagine. Wonder how it would go 
over in Nevada and New Jersey? Well, here at the Rainbow, 
it went over great, until someone suggested making a modest 
wager to heighten the interest. I think the same thought 
occurred to all of us at once: "Is this thing an illegal gaming 
device in this state? Put somebody at the front door as a 





the 
Naked Gamer 

If you think strip poker sounds like' fun, read on. 
Actually, the name of this program package is not 
completely accurate. Only one player will end up com- 
pletely undressed. These games are for the adventurous 
couple! 1 . 

The two games are good by themselves, but in the right com- 
pany they can be terrific. The first is called Strip Tails, and is 
an arcade game played by two players simultaneously. You will 
need quick handson the joystick and a quick grasp of the tactics 
to win, and if you lose, you could really lose your shirt. The other 
game is called Sex, and is something like Mastermind™. Both 
the player and the computer choose a three letter word, and the 
player has to guess the computer's word before the computer 
can guess the player's. 

At the end of each round of either game, the computer will in- 
struct one of the players, by name, to remove a specific item of 
their clothing. Don't worry, there isn't anything obscene in these 
programs. (Remember, you are choosingaTHREE letterword.) 
On the other hand, the RESULTS from playing could be inter- 
esting indeed, and the games are really good even if you elect to 
keep your clothes on. Available on TAPE for $21.95, or on 
DISK for $26.95. You will like these!!! 

WE HAVE MORE — WRITE FOR LIST 

Az. residents add 6$ tax. Please add if 2 . 00 shipping and handl- 
ing per program, and specify your choice of 1st class or UPS. 




Intelligent Adult Software 




it 9 

Tucson, A Z 85731 



P. O, Box 17421 

Dealer & Author Inquiries Invited 



vtsa 


m 




lookout; we may get raided." Really, I did have the feeling 
that maybe I was doing something I shouldn't, but that 
didn't stop me; CoCo Slots is fun. 

CoCo Slots accepts three commands: hitting the "R" key 
gives you a selection of three different screens, each with a 
radically different color scheme; you punch the "I" key to 
insert silver dollars, which plunk down and stack up as you 
add extra coins to improve the odds. Then the space bar is 
used to play the machine. Thus, we may one day have space- 
bar bandits collecting electronically from our savings 
account or, conversely, depositing funds in our Swiss bank 
account. 

I definitely prefer the black-background screen, but some 
who don't see a green screen as often as I do like it because, 
according to my wife, "It's the same color as money." We all 
agree that, in play, CoCo Slots does seem to spin around just 
like the traditional machines. Visually, we think it's hard to 
beat. On the minus side, though, we miss the satisfying 
sound of clinking coins on the payoffs — there could be more 
excitment with more sounds, bells, whistles, sirens. 

Just like the mechanical machines, CoCo Slots is 
attractive because you don't have to know any strategy to 
play. ..do you? I mean, does anybody really believe that 
"putting a little English" on the lever will lead to bigger and 
better payoffs? Well, all I can say is that the last time I saw 
Dr. Doom, he was giving the space bar a sort of grazing 
Karate chop and he was winning big according to his on- 
screen bank balance. 

If the cops don't get you, this is one nicely done game that 
just might pay for itself. I didn't see a thing, your honor, and 
I can't even speak machine language. 

(COCOPRO, P.O. Box 37022, St. Louis, MO 63141, $9) 

Jim Keed 



SUPERIOR 

THE 


ORACLE 
PRESENTS 

c c 


SOFTWARE 

QUBE 


A MAGIC CUBE SIMULATION FOR 


THE COLOR COMPUTER 


FEATURING 






* Easy to use commands 

* Fast - uses machine language routines 

* Random mixes 

* Undo moves or random mixes 

* See all 6 faces 

* Save QUBE to tape for later reload 
•Only $14.95 




RAINBOW 




Send Check or M.O. to: 
SUPERIOR ORACLE SOFTWARE 

PO Bo« 4505 

Greenwich, Conn. 06830 




Conn, residents add V > V. sales tax 
Shipping and handling included 

Personal checks require 
2 weeks to clear 

No C.O.D.s 

Requires 16K Extended Basic 



196 



the RAINBOW Janu? 1983 




COLOR PRODUCTS UNALIKE 





#2931 Euclid Ave. 
Vancouver, B.C. 






Canada V5R-5C5 
(604) 438-2864 



Everything for the TRS-80® Color Computer 




TRS-80* 
COLOR BASIC 
AND EXTENDED 



SYSTEM REFERENCE CARD 



ALL CARDS 

each CANADIANS 

Save the HASSEL..buy in CANADA. 
U.S. COLOR USERS...use your BUYING POWER! 



•NEWNEW* 
WAR KINGS 



$24.95 

Remember Warlords? You'll love this one. A challenging 
game for two for your Color Computer. High resolution 
graphics with outstanding sound make this a real treat, 
Machine language (16K Extended Basic) 

TOM MIX SOFTWARE 

MOON LANDER $19.95 

This one's a real winner. Two programs for the price of one. 
Train on MOON LANDER and then move up to LANDER II. 
Reviewers say just like flying. Outstanding graphics and 
sound. Visit the moon with your Color Computer. Most realistic 
on the market today, (16K Extended Basic) 

DANCING DEVIL $18.95 

Here's a demon of a deal, Watch him dance to 
preprogrammed routines or program your own music and 
dance steps. Youngsters and adults love him. Rave reviews 
by Color Computer magazines. Machine language (16K) 



BERSERK SKY DEFENSE 

$30.95 $18.95 

CC WRITER SPACE TRADERS 

$35.95 $18.95 

MADNESS AND THE MINOTAR 

$26.95 

BLACK SANCTUM 
CALIXTO ISLAND 

$24.95 each 

CC EDITOR, ASSEMBLER & 
DEBUGGER 

$11.95 



ML RABBIT 



$18.95 



No serious programmer can afford to pass this up! Make 
copies of any machine language or BASIC program 
effortlessly. Even copies programs that automatically 
execute. Completely automatic. Protect your tapes with ML 
RABBIT. (Caution: Intended to make backup copies only!) 



British Columbia Residents A dd 6% sales tax. 
All prices quoted in Canadian Dollars. 

U.S. Orders Discounted 25 Percent 

COLORTERM (c) $4095 

the UK Color conputer* as an intelligent terninai 
uith Si or 6S colunns by ?l lines and louer case! 



**- 4K/I6K JARB 

MEMORY CHIP SET • 

Eight NEC 41 16 200 Nanosecond chips with in- 
stallation instructions; no soldering; installs in 
25 minutes $34.95 



**- 16K/32K JARB 

MEMORY UPGRADE KIT - 

Hardware and instructions to convert 16K color 
computer to 32K; minimal soldering required; 
installs in 30 minutes $49.95 



Hardware Review.. 



Two Interfaces 
Expand CoCo's Powers 

By Dr. Laurence D. Preble 



The Radio Shack Color Computer has enjoyed increasing 
popularity in recent months. One explanation is that it is an 
incredibly capable machine in its own right. Another factor 
is the amazing amount of support from independent 
software houses and manufacturers of compatible 
peripherals. The TRS-80C is not just for games anymore. 

The Color Computer can use and control a myriad of 
peripheral devices — modems, printers, digitizers, plotters 
and yes, game cartridges — but not usually more than one at 
a time. Not until now, that is. 

General Automation and Basic Technology are two 
companies that have recently released expansion interfaces 
for the Color Computer. The two interfaces are quite 
different in design, but both allow simultaneous use of add- 
on devices. 
The CX-P1 by General Automation. 

The CX-P1 serves a dual purpose. The simplest use is a 
convenient support for your television or monitor. It is 
fabricated with a strong aluminum chassis which allows the 
Color Computer to slip underneath while the TV sits on top. 
More importantly, the device comes with a parallel port for 
your printer, leaving the RS-232 port available for a modem 
or other serial add-on. A supplied software patch tells Basic 
to dump all its printer output to the parallel port. We 
plugged a 200 character-per-second parallel printer into the 
CX-P1 and it ran at full tilt! The unit has an expansion port 
which can select up to seven more peripheral cards. General 
Automation has promised to release additional 1/ O cards, a 
speech synthesizer board, and a 12-bit A/D card. 

The CX-PI has an extension cable that plugs into the 
Color Computer's cartridge slot. By the way, the plug on the 
cable is much smaller than a disk controller so that it does 
not protrude as if the computer had been stabbed by a spear. 
Disk drives may be plugged into a connector on the main 
chassis of the unit. A special circuit inside theCX-Pl allows 
a 32K (Rev-E) Color Computer to expand to 64K without 
internal modification. 

The documentation supplied was brief but adequate. 
Most of the documentation was reasonably easy to 
understand. One exception is the section on the technical 
aspects of the CX-PI. While the supplied technical 
information is of great use to those who wish to design their 
own add-ons, the novice is cautioned that this material is not 
for him. A familiarity with the inner workings of the Color 
Computer is mandatory for complete understanding of the 
technical documentation. Most users will want to skip this 
section and simply follow the easy-to-read installation 
instructions. 

The BT-1000 by Basic Technology 

The BT-1000 is a more complex device that will support 
various configurations of memory and input/ output 
devices. The unit occupies a desk area about 15 inches by 
eight inches. It is not intended that you set a TV on top of it; 
however, the BT-1000 does appear well-constructed, with a 
quality double-sided circuit board and gold-plated 
connectors. The device has a buffered cable that plugs into 
the Color Computer's cartridge slot. The main box contains 
its own power supply, thereby minimizing the power drain 
on the Color Computer. 



Internally, the BT-1000 will support individually or in 
combination up to 8K of RAM or ROM. This is helpful for 
those who wish to keep a favorite monitor or machine 
language routine up in high memory. Additionally, the BT- 
1000 will accept up to five plug-in cartridges that are Radio 
Shack compatible. I should emphasize here that the BT- 
1000 is not a switching device for cartridges. All five 
cartridge slots are activated at once; therefore, it is not 
possible to plug in five game cartridges and selectively 
activate one at a time. If five game cartridges were 
simultaneously plugged in, they would all fight for the same 
chunk of memory causing great confusion to the Color 
Computer. Avoid fights! Plug in only those cartridges that 
do not require the same block of memory. (Most ROM Pack 
cartridges try to grab the memory locations between 
&HC000 and &HDFFF.) Some examples of compatible 
cartridges could include an extra serial port, a parallel port, 
a real time clock and yes, a game cartridge. 

What if I want to copy a ROM cartridge directly to disk? 
The ROM cartridge would try to grab the same memory 
locations as the disk controller. Fortunately, the BT-1000 
does have a sneaky way of getting around the problem. By 
flipping a few switches, it is possible to force the ROM 
cartridge to grab a higher chunk of memory. If the cartridge 
usually occupied memory starting at &HC000, then it would 
now occupy memory beginning at &HE000. Since the new 
location does not conflict with the Disk Operating System, 
you could tell Basic to save the new block of memory to disk 
without any hassle. If the ROM Pack contains machine 
language code that is written so that it will run anywhere in 
memory, then it may also be possible to EXEC the ROM 
program up at its new location. 

Basic Technology was also kind enough to supply us with 
their BT-1020 Time of Day Clock which can be plugged 
directly into the Color Computer or can be used with the 
BT-1000 box. The clock is supplied with software that 
appears to work as advertised. The clock features a calendar 
with day of week, leap year compensation and automatic 
adjustment for daylight savings time. Also included is an 
alarm circuit and variable timer pulse cycle and a NiCad 
battery to keep it alive when the computer is off. 

Currently, the documentation for the BT-1000 is written 
for the more technically oriented user; it requires 
considerable study for full comprehension. Nonetheless, 
Basic Technology promises to provide assistance to the 
novice — by phone or letter. 

CX-PI, General Automation, 9600 Roosevelt Blvd., Suite 
100-LL, Philadelphia, PA 19115, $199.95; BT-1000, Basic 
Technology, Dept. Q, P.O.Box 511, Ortonville, MI 48462, 
$270.00; with 8K RAM $300.00, BT-1020 Clock/Calendar, 
$109.00. 



RAINBO Wfest 
Chicago April 22-24 



198 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 



THESE FINE STORES CARRY THE RAINBOW 



The retail stores listed below cany the RAINBOW on 


Interest to Color Computer users. We sug< 


Abacus Computers 


The Computer Center 


S. Holland. Mich. 


New York. N. Y. 


Accolade Distributors 


The Computer Connection 


San Diego. Calif. 


Boulder. Col. 


Acme Book Co. 


Computer Corner 


Baton Rouge. La. 


Lapeer. Mich. 


A Computer Store 


Computer Shack 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


Pontiac. Mich. 


Act One Video 


The Computer Store 


Marietta, Ga. 


Louisville. Ky. 


Adventure International Store 


The Computer Store 


Longwood, Fla. 


Pheonix, Ariz. 


All-Pro Souvenlers 


The Computer Store 


Pittsburgh, Pa 


San Diego. Calif. 


All Systems Go 


The Computer Store 


Orlando. Fla. 


Tulsa. Okla. 


Tempo. Ariz, 


Computer Emporium 


Amateur Radio Equipment Co. 


Louisville. Ky. 


Wichita. Kan. 


Computer Resource 


Appletree Computers 


Wlillamsvllie. N.Y. 


DeKalb. ill. 


CompServ of Danbury 


Atlantic News 


Danbury. Conn. 


Halifax, N.S. 


Computer Services 


Audio Concepts Unlimited 


Lawrenceburg. Ind. 


Denton, Tex 


Computer SOS 


Bauer Electronics 


Shreveport, La. 


Lawrenceburg. Ind. 


Compuferwore Store 


B. Dalton Booksellers 


Enclnitas. Calff. 


West Jackson St. - Chicago. III. 


Cosmos Computers 


N. WOlbash St. - Chicago. III. 


Bettendorf. Iowa 


Milwaukee, Wise. 


Crouchet Electronics 


Peoria, ill. 


Conroe, Texas 


Beg toy Drugs 


Dallas Computer Center 


Crestwood, Ky. 


Dallas. Tex. 


B.I.E.S. Systems 


Data Born 


Oak Park. Ill 


Renton, Wash. 


Bills TV Radio Shack 


Data Byte Computer Center 


Newton, III. 


Beaufort, S.C. 


Bob's in Newtown 


Data Concepts 


Chicago. III. 


Scottsdale. Ariz. 


Bob's News Emporium 


Data Domain 


Chicago, III. 


Schaumberg, III. 


Bob's Rogers Park 


Data Link 


Chicago. III. 


Dayton. Ohio 


Book Market 


Dave's Elect. Radio Shack 


East Cedar - Chicago. III. 


Pennsville. NJ 


North Cicero - Chicago III. 


D. Data 


West Diversey - Chicago. III. 


Stillwater. Okla. 


Peoria, III. 


Delker Electronics 


Champaign. III. 


Smyrna, Tenn. 


Danville, III. 


Disney's Electronics 


Book Nook 


San Diego. Calif. 


Lisle, III. 


Dimensional Software 


Book Tree 


San Diego. Calif. 


Milwaukee, Wise. 


DSL Computer Products 


Booked Solid 


Daerbom, Mich. 


Wllwaukee. Wise. 


E. B. Garcia A Associates 


Bookland, Inc. 


Chicago. III. 


Indianapolis. Ind. 


The Eight Bit Corner 


Buffalo Technologies 


Muskegon. Mich. 


Amherst, N.V. 


Electronic World 


Byte By Byte 


Fairbanks. Alaska 


UNca Mich. 


Elex Mart 


Campus Computer Corp. 


Jasper. Ind. 


Nashville. Tenn. 


F.M. Electronics 


CeJ Electronics Computer Center 


Jay. Maine 


Richland. Wash. 


Galls Book World 


Capitol Microcomputers 


Hamilton. Ont. 


Austin, Tex. 


Game Preserve 


Caves Books Co. 


Indianapolis. Ind. 


Hong Kong 


Gopher Hole 


Chester Electronic Supply 


Brooklyn Center. Minn. 


Kenosha, Wise. 


The Green Dragon 


Chicago-Main News 


N. Charleston, S.C 


Evanston, III. 


Guild Books and Periodicals 


Chips, Inc. 


Chicago. III. 


Atlanta. Ga. 


GYC Co. 


CMD Micro 


York. Pa. 


Edmonton, Atta, 


Hands On Computer 


Coast Electronics 


Atlanta. Ga. 


Mono Bay. Calif. 


Hawley-Cook Booksellers 


Color Computing 


Louisville. Ky. 


Southgate. Calif. 


Home Computer Store 


Color Products Unalike 


Westerville. Ohio 


Vancouver. B.C. 


Home Brew Computers 


CompuLIt 


Pheonix, Ariz. 


Bumaby. B.C. 

Ml 





Hurley Electronics 

Santa Anna, Calif. 

HW Electronics 

Northridge, Calif. 

Jarb Software 

National City. Calif. 

John's News Stand 

Medford, Ore. 

KAS News Stand 

Winston-Salem. N.C. 

Kono Recreation 

Kallua-Kona. Hawaii 

Kelly Software Distributors 

Edmondton, Alta. 

Kroch's A Brentano's 

South Walbash - Chicago. III. 

West Jackson. Chicago. III. 

835 N. Michigan - Chicago. I 

516 N. Michigan - Chicago. I 

Oak Park. III. 

Oak Brook, III. 

Skokie. III. 

Aurora. III. 

L&R Electronics 

Grant's Pass. Ore. 

Leo's Book ft Wine Shop 

Toledo. Ohio 

Level IV Products 

Livonia. Mich. 

Levity Distributors 

Hollywood, Calif. 

Libra Books 

Eugene. Ore. 

Little Professor Book Center 

Philadelphia. Ohio 

Canton. Ohio 

Madlton Books 

Madison, Ala. 

Marklln 

Cincinnati. Ohio 

Micro Byte 

Miami, Fla. 

Mlcroconnectlon Software 

Wobum, Wash. 

Microwest Distributors 

N. Vancouver. B.C. 

Multi-Mag 

London, Ont, 

NORMAR 

Wilmington. Del. 

OPAMP Technical Books 

Los Angeles. Calif. 

Out Of Town News 

Cambridge. Mass. 

Parkwest Books 

Chicago. III. 

PCLEARfiO 

Mansfield. Ohio 

Perry's News Shop 

Avondale. Pa. 

Personal Computer Place 

Mesa, Ariz. 

Personal Software 

Malvern, Pa. 

Porthsmouth Computers 

Portsmouth. N.H. 

Printers, Inc. 

Palo Alto. Calif. 

Prism Software 

Kincardine. Ont. 

Pro Am Electronics 

Pacific Beach. Calif. 

The Program Store 

Baltimore. Md. 

Falls Church. Va. 

Columbus. Ohio 

Washington. D.C. 

Programs Plus 

Tukwila. Wash. 

Programs Unlimited 

Mayfleid Heights. Ohio 

Prospect News ft Magazines 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

Radio Shack 

El Cajon, Calif. 

Radio Shack 

Freehold, N.J. 



Radio Shack 

Paducah, Ky. 

Radio Shack 

Peterborough. N.H. 

Radio Shack 

San Diego. Calif. 

Rainbow Software Services 

Calgary, Alta. 

RftV Sound 

Fortuna. Calif. 

Recycle Computers 

Houston. Tex. 

RFI Electronics 

Ft. Worth. Tex. 

Road Runner Computer Products 

Glendale. Ariz. 

Salt of the Earth 

Albuquerque. N.M. 

Sandmeyef'i Bookstore 

Chicago. III. 

Sewing Center 

Orlando. Fla. 

Soft Sector Marketing 

Garden City. Mich. 

Software Access 

Irving. Tex. 

Software W Suds 

E. Windsor. N.J. 

Soft Shop 

Yuma. Ariz. 

Software Centre 

Torrance. Calif. 

Software City 

Fairvlew. N.J. 

Midland Park, NJ. 

Montvale, N.J. 

River Edge. N.J. 

Summit. N.J. 

Teaneck, N.J. 

Software Concepts 

Dallas. Tex. 

Software Connection 

Ft. Lauderdale. Fla. 

Software 1st 

Santa Rosa, Calif. 

Software Plus 

Citrus Heights. Calif. 

Software Shop 

Mansfield, Mass. 

Software Store 

Tampa. Fla. 

The Software Store 

Rockville. Md. 

Software Unlimited 

Tucson. Ariz. 

Software Unlimited 

Orlando. Fla. 

Sound Video Ltd. 

Niles. III. 

Spectrum Projects 

Woodhaven. N.Y. 

Strowf lower Electronics 

Half Moon Bay, Calif. 

Tobacco Corner Newsroom 

Memphis. Tenn. 

T. M. Computers 

Kingston. Ont. 

Trl-Tek Computers 

Pheonix, Ariz. 

Unicorn Electronics 

Johnson City. N.Y. 

University of Chicago Bookstore 

Chicago. III. 

University of Illinois Bookstore 

Chicago, ill. 

University of Wisconsin Bookstore 

Milwaukee, Wise. 

video mat, Inc. 

Chicago, lit. 

Village Computer ft Software 

Cedar Knolls. NJ. 

Wayne Software 

Wayne, NJ. 

Willy's Electronics 

National City. Calif. 



January, 1983 the RAINBOW 199 



UHB^^Bi 



ADVERTISER'S INDEX 

We encourage you to patronize our 
advertisers— all of whom support the TRS-80 
Color and TDP System-1 00 computers. We will 
appreciate your mentioning the RAINBOW 
when you contact these firms. 



Aardvark 80 151 

All Color Software 142 

A M. Hearn Software 168 

American Library & Info Services 

112 

Anteco 9 

Arizin 169 

Ark Royal Games 50 

Armadillo International 63 

Aurora Software 64 

Basic Technology 127 

Better Software 66 

B5 Software 122 

Botek Instruments 159 

Bruck Associates 49 

Bumblebee Software 71 

Cer-Comp 1 14, 135 

Chattanooga Choo-Choo Software 

108 

Chromasette 85 

Chromatic Software 94 

Circle City Software 147 

CoCo Data Enterprises 76 

CoCo Pro 14 

CoCo Warehouse 13 

Cognitec 31 

Color Computer Weekly 196 

Color Products Unalike 197 

Color Software Services 

17,93, 111 

Color Soft Software 132 

Comp-U-Kids 24 

Compukit 121 

Computer Accessories 

of Arizona 141 

Computer Island 171 

Computer Peripheral Resources 

70 

Computer Plus 3 

Computer Shack 52, 139, 173 

Computerware 51, 125, 177 

Custom Software Engineering 

117 

Dataman 61 

Debug 15 

Desert Software 18 

Double Density Software 165 

DSL Computer Products 119 

Dymax 78 

Dynamic Electronics 65 



80-U.S. Journal 161 

Elite Software 21 

Endicott Software 129 

Erickson, B 80, 82 

General Automation 167 

Genesis Software 48 

Great X#F*T 32 

Harmonycs 1 23 

HIB Software 144 

Home Base Systems 1 88 

Home Run Software 16 

F 8c T Software 189 

Frank Hogg Laboratory. . . 67, 68, 69 

Illustrated Memory Banks 109 

Hume Design 55 

Intellectronics 115 

Inter+Action 116 

Intercept Enterprises 94 

International Software 43 

Intracolor 113 

International Color Computer 

Club 1 79 

JARB Software 97, 157 

JFC 69 

K&K Computerware 23 

Land Systems 1 78 

Mark Data Products IBC 

Martin Consulting 133 

Med Systems Software 11 

Micro-Doc 62 

Micro-80 162, 163 

Micrologic 146 

Micronics 33 

Micro Technical Products 77 

The Micro Works 1 55 

Tom Mix Software 25, 81, 194 

Moreton Bay Laboratory . . 136, 138 

Moses Engineering 150 

Nanos Systems Corp IFC 

Nelson Software Systems 88, 89, 153 

Oelrich Publications 156 

Owl-Ware 152 

Parsons Software 1 60 

PCLEAR80 130 

Peacock Enterprises 1 74, 1 75 

Petrocci Freelance Associates 

53 

Platinum Software 83 

Prickly-Pear Software 
124, 134, 181, 198 



Prism Software 96 

Programs By Mr. Bob 158 

The Program Store 57 

The Programmer's Guild 47, 185 

The Programmer's Institute 

28, 29 

Q-Soft 164 

Q Systems 176 

Quasar Animations 73 

Radio Shack 19 

Rainbow Connection Software 

75 

Rainbow On Tape 190 

Real Software 180 

68 Micro Journal 192 

S 8c S Arcade 143 

Selected Software 59 

Shauntronics 45 

Silver Spring Software 86 

Snake Mountain Software 137 

Soft City 41 

Software Shop 90 

Softwride 1 72 

Southco Sales 187 

Southern Software 195 

Spectral Associates 27, BC 

Spectrum Projects 

99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 107 

Speech Systems 1 70 

Star-Kits 193 

Starship Software 110 

Hoyt Stearns Electronics 140 

Strictly Color 183 

Sugar Software 182 

Superior Graphic Software 147 

Superior Oracle Software 196 

Tabby Enterprises 22 

TASADA 54 

T&D Software 131 . 

Transformation Technologies ..184 

Transition Technology 110 

TRICO 34 

Universal Data Research 

Institute 58 

Valhalla Enterprises 34 

Washington Computer Services 

98 

York-10 79 

Zeta Software 145 



RAINBOWfest 

Regency-Hyatt Woodfield Chicago April 22-24 



200 



the RAINBOW January, 1983 




nother invaders I 



sound, 



/ 




A new super hi-res space game. 
Wave after wave of alien attackers, 
each one a different and unique challenge 
to your skills. 
CASSETTE (16K) . . . $24.95 
DISC (32K) . . . $29.95 



CASSETTE (16K) .... $24.95 
DISK (32K) ....$29.95 



** VOL 



Outsmart the 

ures that pursue 

you as you hunt for 

treasure in a maze of 

cave passages. Lots of 

colors and sounds! 



They're calling .-, 
this one a "classic". You'll /' 
have hours of fast-paced fun 
zapping robots. Super hi-res act 
CASSETTE (16K) . . . $24.95 
DISC (32K) . . . $29.95 





^ challenging puzzle 

iional twist of humor. 

There's a treasure waiting to be discovered! 

CASSETTE (16K) . . . $19.95 



<Sl|e Slack Sanctum 



For the player who enjoys suspense. 
You'll encounter the forces of black 
magic in this spooky adventure. 

CASSETTE (16K) . . . $19.95 



MARK DATA PRODUCTS 

24001 ALICIA PARKWAY- SUITE 226.MISSION VIEJO, CA 92691 • (714) 768-1551 

We pay shipping on all orders in the continental U.S. and Canada. Overseas add $3.00. California residents 
please add 6% sales tax. Weare always looking for quality machine language programs. Contact us for details. 

MASTER CHARGE OR VISA ACCEPTED 



SPECTACULAR GAME 1 

For TRS 80 

COLOR COMPUTER 




The largest supplier of Color Computer software and have FUKPLUS DOS, Ultra flOCC (Disc Ed/Assem), hardware and utilities.